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about the word "muse"

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  • Elizabeth Apgar Triano
    .. so, I was going to use this word muse the other day, as a noun, but it occurred to me that it is generally a feminine word, because the Muses were all
    Message 1 of 3 , Dec 15, 2004
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      .. so, I was going to use this word "muse" the other day, as a noun, but
      it occurred to me that it is generally a feminine word, because the Muses
      were all female, weren't they? and even when used as in "the poet and his
      Muse," it is generally the poet and HIS Muse, and said Muse is some female
      person. So what does one use for a male Muse? The closest thing I could
      come up with was daemon, but that seemed to be in use in that manner only
      in a very select time and place, or genre.

      Lizzie


      Elizabeth Apgar Triano
      lizziewriter@...
      amor vincit omnia
      www.lizziewriter.com
      www.danburymineralogicalsociety.org
    • Christine Howlett
      I have no problem having a feminine muse, second-rate and profligate as she is. After all, she is supposed to be there for inspiration not sex. Though mine
      Message 2 of 3 , Dec 15, 2004
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        I have no problem having a feminine muse, second-rate and profligate as she
        is. After all, she is supposed to be there for inspiration not sex. Though
        mine spends a lot of time hanging around bars in dissolute fashion rather
        than attending to business.
        Christine
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "Elizabeth Apgar Triano" <lizziewriter@...>
        To: "Mythsoc" <Mythsoc@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Wednesday, December 15, 2004 2:15 PM
        Subject: [mythsoc] about the word "muse"


        >
        >
        > .. so, I was going to use this word "muse" the other day, as a noun, but
        > it occurred to me that it is generally a feminine word, because the Muses
        > were all female, weren't they? and even when used as in "the poet and his
        > Muse," it is generally the poet and HIS Muse, and said Muse is some female
        > person. So what does one use for a male Muse? The closest thing I could
        > come up with was daemon, but that seemed to be in use in that manner only
        > in a very select time and place, or genre.
        >
        > Lizzie
        >
        >
        > Elizabeth Apgar Triano
        > lizziewriter@...
        > amor vincit omnia
        > www.lizziewriter.com
        > www.danburymineralogicalsociety.org
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > The Mythopoeic Society website http://www.mythsoc.org
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
      • Elizabeth Apgar Triano
        Ah, well, there is that. I am sorry if I gave the impression that one had to have an opposite-gender inspirational genius. And one can certainly have more
        Message 3 of 3 , Dec 15, 2004
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          Ah, well, there is that. I am sorry if I gave the impression that one had
          to have an opposite-gender inspirational genius. And one can certainly
          have more than one. But when the spirit is masculine, what do you call it?
          "Awen" seemed too impersonal, or more powerful, or something. Not
          something one could lend a personality to, but perhaps I am mistaken.
          "Genius" is too common a word with too many trappings on it already.
          "Daemon" has been taken over by the software industry (and then there is
          also "daimon") but it seemed the best bet, or the one with a shot at
          resurrecting in that meaning.

          I need an OED.

          Lizzie

          Elizabeth Apgar Triano
          lizziewriter@...
          amor vincit omnia
          www.lizziewriter.com
          www.danburymineralogicalsociety.org

          > From: Christine Howlett <chowlett@...>
          > To: <mythsoc@yahoogroups.com>
          > Date: 12/15/2004 9:40:28 PM
          > Subject: Re: [mythsoc] about the word "muse"
          >
          > I have no problem having a feminine muse, second-rate and profligate as
          she
          > is. After all, she is supposed to be there for inspiration not sex.
          Though
          > mine spends a lot of time hanging around bars in dissolute fashion rather
          > than attending to business.
          > Christine
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