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The New Yorker: The Critics: Books

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  • Stolzi
    Came across a link to this essay on Dunsany, by one Laura Miller: http://www.newyorker.com/critics/books/?041206crbo_books1 Diamond Proudbrook
    Message 1 of 7 , Dec 2, 2004
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      Came across a link to this essay on Dunsany, by one Laura Miller:

      http://www.newyorker.com/critics/books/?041206crbo_books1

      Diamond Proudbrook
    • Elizabeth Apgar Triano
      PS Sorry, forgot to add... he lived until 1957? Wow. That seems so recent. I wasn t born yet, but I bet a lot of other list members were. Elizabeth Apgar
      Message 2 of 7 , Dec 2, 2004
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        PS Sorry, forgot to add... he lived until 1957? Wow. That seems so
        recent. I wasn't born yet, but I bet a lot of other list members were.

        Elizabeth Apgar Triano
        lizziewriter@...
        amor vincit omnia
        www.lizziewriter.com
        www.danburymineralogicalsociety.org


        > [Original Message]
        > From: Stolzi <Stolzi@...>
        > To: Mythopoeic Society <mythsoc@yahoogroups.com>
        > Date: 12/2/2004 10:56:18 AM
        > Subject: [mythsoc] The New Yorker: The Critics: Books
        >
        >
        > Came across a link to this essay on Dunsany, by one Laura Miller:
        >
        > http://www.newyorker.com/critics/books/?041206crbo_books1
        >
        > Diamond Proudbrook
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > The Mythopoeic Society website http://www.mythsoc.org
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
      • Elizabeth Apgar Triano
        I thought this bit was especially provocative:
        Message 3 of 7 , Dec 2, 2004
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          I thought this bit was especially provocative:


          << Dunsany�s first book, �The Gods of Pega�na� (included in its entirety in
          the Penguin volume), related the cosmogony of the imaginary island nation
          of Pega�na in a prose style that mimics the archaic cadences of the Bible.
          This imitation is so persuasive that few have noticed how little
          understanding of religious feeling its author shows. Pega�na has gods of
          dust, of silence, and of �little dreams and fancies� but no gods or
          goddesses of the harvest, of war, or of love�pretty much the core
          curriculum for heathen deities. Dunsany�s creation is a sumptuous pageant
          of Symbolist exotica that lies closer in spirit to Aubrey Beardsley and The
          Yellow Book than to any actual sacred text. The myths that Dunsany
          concocted elaborate on the futility of human ambitions and even the
          ephemerality of the gods themselves, who will vanish into nothingness on
          the awakening of a still older creator, called Ma�na-Yood-Susha�i. �We are
          the gods,� these divinities chant. �We are the little games of
          Ma�na-Yood-Susha�i that he hath played and hath forgotten.� Dunsany,
          himself an atheist, seemed indifferent to the needs that religions arise to
          answer: for hope, or meaning, or a sense that the universe is directed by
          entities not unlike ourselves. What Dunsany liked about gods was their
          empyrean vantage point, remote from the world and amused by human striving.
          >>


          Not mythopoeic in the sense that we so often seem to tie to religion here.
          More like Lovecraft. I don't know anything about Symbolists either. Dang,
          it's inconvenient to be so ignorant.



          Elizabeth Apgar Triano
          lizziewriter@...
          amor vincit omnia
          www.lizziewriter.com
          www.danburymineralogicalsociety.org


          > [Original Message]
          > From: Stolzi <Stolzi@...>
          > To: Mythopoeic Society <mythsoc@yahoogroups.com>
          > Date: 12/2/2004 10:56:18 AM
          > Subject: [mythsoc] The New Yorker: The Critics: Books
          >
          >
          > Came across a link to this essay on Dunsany, by one Laura Miller:
          >
          > http://www.newyorker.com/critics/books/?041206crbo_books1
          >
          > Diamond Proudbrook
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > The Mythopoeic Society website http://www.mythsoc.org
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
        • Elizabeth Apgar Triano
          So is the idea here that he is not much of a one for Story or Plot? And things have to happen, really. Elizabeth Apgar Triano lizziewriter@earthlink.net amor
          Message 4 of 7 , Dec 2, 2004
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            So is the idea here that he is not much of a one for Story or Plot? And
            things have to happen, really.


            Elizabeth Apgar Triano
            lizziewriter@...
            amor vincit omnia
            www.lizziewriter.com
            www.danburymineralogicalsociety.org


            > [Original Message]
            > From: Stolzi <Stolzi@...>
            > To: Mythopoeic Society <mythsoc@yahoogroups.com>
            > Date: 12/2/2004 10:56:18 AM
            > Subject: [mythsoc] The New Yorker: The Critics: Books
            >
            >
            > Came across a link to this essay on Dunsany, by one Laura Miller:
            >
            > http://www.newyorker.com/critics/books/?041206crbo_books1
            >
            > Diamond Proudbrook
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > The Mythopoeic Society website http://www.mythsoc.org
            > Yahoo! Groups Links
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
          • David Bratman
            ... I was puzzled by the article s implication that this is a criticism. ... Actually, a number of Dunsany s stories are a living refutation of the hack
            Message 5 of 7 , Dec 2, 2004
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              At 12:11 PM 12/2/2004 -0500, Lizzie quoted:

              >Dunsany�s creation is a sumptuous pageant
              >of Symbolist exotica that lies closer in spirit to Aubrey Beardsley and The
              >Yellow Book than to any actual sacred text.

              I was puzzled by the article's implication that this is a criticism.


              >So is the idea here that he is not much of a one for Story or Plot? And
              >things have to happen, really.

              Actually, a number of Dunsany's stories are a living refutation of the hack
              writer's creed that good stories have to be event-packed and full of Conflict.

              David Bratman
            • Elizabeth Apgar Triano
              ... The ... OK. So I have some reading to do. So that is not such a bad thing then? ... hack ... Conflict. Maybe not Full of Conflict, but Something Should
              Message 6 of 7 , Dec 2, 2004
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                > [Original Message]
                > From: David Bratman <dbratman@...>
                > To: <mythsoc@yahoogroups.com>
                > Date: 12/2/2004 1:36:33 PM
                > Subject: RE: [mythsoc] The New Yorker: The Critics: Books
                >
                >
                > At 12:11 PM 12/2/2004 -0500, Lizzie quoted:
                >
                > >Dunsany�s creation is a sumptuous pageant
                > >of Symbolist exotica that lies closer in spirit to Aubrey Beardsley and
                The
                > >Yellow Book than to any actual sacred text.
                >
                > I was puzzled by the article's implication that this is a criticism.
                >
                OK. So I have some reading to do. So that is not such a bad thing then?


                > >So is the idea here that he is not much of a one for Story or Plot? And
                > >things have to happen, really.
                >
                > Actually, a number of Dunsany's stories are a living refutation of the
                hack
                > writer's creed that good stories have to be event-packed and full of
                Conflict.

                Maybe not Full of Conflict, but Something Should Happen... don't you think?
                Otherwise who needs three hundred pages for what could be said in a
                two-page poem?

                Oh, should I duck now?

                Other notes good too, I think I have lost too much ground to continue
                poking the tigers, and anyway it's almost time for all that quotidian
                stuff... school bus, homework, rock club, etc. Thanks for bearing with me.
                >
                >
                Lizzie

                Elizabeth Apgar Triano
                lizziewriter@...
                amor vincit omnia
                www.lizziewriter.com
                www.danburymineralogicalsociety.org
                >
                >
                > The Mythopoeic Society website http://www.mythsoc.org
                > Yahoo! Groups Links
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
              • Bill
                I d take anything..ok, nearly anything by Dunsany over 99% of today s writers. I m eternally grateful to Lin Carter for introducing me to Dunsany and Morris
                Message 7 of 7 , Dec 2, 2004
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                  I'd take anything..ok, nearly anything by Dunsany over 99% of today's
                  writers.
                  I'm eternally grateful to Lin Carter for introducing me to Dunsany and
                  Morris in the original Ballantine Adult Fantasy Series.
                  Bill





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