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Re: [mythsoc] help with classics?

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  • Elizabeth Apgar Triano
    Yup, it is, and didn t she give him a smart retort in someone else s poem somewhat later? Actually, who are you, and what did you do with Wendell? You re
    Message 1 of 11 , Nov 24, 2004
      Yup, it is, and didn't she give him a smart retort in someone else's poem
      somewhat later?

      Actually, who are you, and what did you do with Wendell? You're gonna ruin
      his reputation saying that that's his favorite poem.

      Maybe someone who has actually read this stuff in recent memory could chime
      in and tell us whether the Ars was written half in fun.

      I'm still reading about the squid god -- or actually it's pie baking time.
      Don't tell me that some of you get to gather at holiday meals with lots of
      other book fiends for literary pow-wows, I think I'd about burst with envy.



      Elizabeth Apgar Triano
      lizziewriter@...
      amor vincit omnia
      www.lizziewriter.com


      > [Original Message]
      > From: <WendellWag@...>
      > To: <mythsoc@yahoogroups.com>
      > Date: 11/24/2004 11:38:33 AM
      > Subject: Re: [mythsoc] help with classics?
      >
      >
      > "Love conquers all" is a pretty vague statement that could be applied to
      a
      > lot of different philosophies. To most modern people without a tradition
      of
      > arranged marriages, it means just "I love you and you love me, so life is
      going
      > to be just hunky-dory from now on." To medieval people and perhaps to
      people
      > in ancient times, it was more about falling in love with someone whom
      your
      > social class or your already arranged marriage forbid you from marrying.
      To Ovid,
      > though, it apparently just meant "You think I'm kind of cute and I think
      > you're kind of cute, right? So let's do it right here and now. Why
      waste time
      > talking about it?" As much as I love "To His Coy Mistress" (and, really
      and
      > truly, it's my favorite poem), on some level it's a guy saying "You know
      you want
      > it, baby" to a girl.
      >
      > Wendell Wagner
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > The Mythopoeic Society website http://www.mythsoc.org
      > Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
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