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Lewis Question

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  • Liz Katz
    I m re-reading Lewis The Horse and His Boy and a passage has set me pondering. In it Cor describes how he came to be brought up by a fisherman: the prophecy,
    Message 1 of 9 , Nov 23, 2004
      I'm re-reading Lewis' The Horse and His Boy and a passage has set me
      pondering. In it Cor describes how he came to be brought up by a
      fisherman: the prophecy, an abduction, a flight to ships...

      "It must have been a wonderful chase. They were six days
      following Bar's galleon and brought her to battle on the
      seventh. It was a great sea-fight (I heard a lot about it
      yesterday evening) from ten o'clock in the morning till sunset.
      Our people took the ship in the end. But I wasn't there. The
      Lord Bar himself had been killed in the battle. But one of his
      men said that, early that morning, as soon as he saw he was
      certain to be overhauled, Bar had given me to one of his
      knights and sent us both away in the ship's boat. And that boat
      was never seen again. But of course that was the same boat
      that Aslan (he seems to be at the back of all the stories) pushed
      ashore at the right place for Arsheesh to pick me up. I wish I
      knew that knight's name, for he must have kept me alive and
      starved himself to do it."
      "I suppose Aslan would say that was part of someone else's
      story," said Aravis.

      I feel like I should know the knight's name. I can think of nothing
      from his usual sources: Bible, Arthurian lore, icelandic or classical
      mythology... It is driving me crazy. Is anyone willing to hazard a
      guess?

      Thanks much,

      Liz Katz




      -------------------------------------
      Liz Katz
      206 297-2724
      lizkz@...
      -------------------------------------
    • WendellWag@aol.com
      In a message dated 11/23/2004 3:22:08 PM Eastern Standard Time, ... Well, it s vaguely a fairy tale motif. The evil ruler wants to get rid of a child, so he
      Message 2 of 9 , Nov 24, 2004
        In a message dated 11/23/2004 3:22:08 PM Eastern Standard Time,
        lizkatz@... writes:

        > I can think of nothing
        > from his usual sources: Bible, Arthurian lore, icelandic or classical
        > mythology...

        Well, it's vaguely a fairy tale motif. The evil ruler wants to get rid of a
        child, so he gives him to a servant to bring to the forest and kill. Instead,
        the servant lets the child go in the forest because he's unable to kill a
        child.

        Wendell Wagner


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Liz Katz
        Yes. The Snow White sort. Only, I can t think of one where the servant dies to save the child. But maybe that s of no consequence. Liz ... Liz Katz 206
        Message 3 of 9 , Nov 24, 2004
          Yes. The Snow White sort. Only, I can't think of one where the servant
          dies to save the child.
          But maybe that's of no consequence.
          Liz

          On Nov 24, 2004, at 7:47 AM, WendellWag@... wrote:

          > In a message dated 11/23/2004 3:22:08 PM Eastern Standard Time,
          > lizkatz@... writes:
          >
          > > I can think of  nothing
          > > from his usual sources: Bible, Arthurian lore, icelandic or classical
          > > mythology...
          >
          > Well, it's vaguely a fairy tale motif.  The evil ruler wants to get
          > rid of a
          > child, so he gives him to a servant to bring to the forest and kill. 
          > Instead,
          > the servant lets the child go in the forest because he's unable to
          > kill a
          > child.
          >
          > Wendell Wagner
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >
          >
          > The Mythopoeic Society websitehttp://www.mythsoc.org
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          -------------------------------------
          Liz Katz
          206 297-2724
          lizkz@...
          -------------------------------------
        • Elizabeth Apgar Triano
          Isn t there a story about a Scottish prince who is carried away Over the Sea to Skye? I have only heard a folk song, and that not often. Lizzie Elizabeth
          Message 4 of 9 , Nov 24, 2004
            Isn't there a story about a Scottish prince who is carried away Over the
            Sea to Skye? I have only heard a folk song, and that not often.

            Lizzie

            Elizabeth Apgar Triano
            lizziewriter@...
            amor vincit omnia
            www.lizziewriter.com
            www.danburymineralogicalsociety.org


            > [Original Message]
            > From: Liz Katz <lizkatz@...>
            > To: <mythsoc@yahoogroups.com>
            > Date: 11/23/2004 2:56:49 PM
            > Subject: [mythsoc] Lewis Question
            >
            >
            >
            > I'm re-reading Lewis' The Horse and His Boy and a passage has set me
            > pondering. In it Cor describes how he came to be brought up by a
            > fisherman: the prophecy, an abduction, a flight to ships...
            >
            > "It must have been a wonderful chase. They were six days
            > following Bar's galleon and brought her to battle on the
            > seventh. It was a great sea-fight (I heard a lot about it
            > yesterday evening) from ten o'clock in the morning till sunset.
            > Our people took the ship in the end. But I wasn't there. The
            > Lord Bar himself had been killed in the battle. But one of his
            > men said that, early that morning, as soon as he saw he was
            > certain to be overhauled, Bar had given me to one of his
            > knights and sent us both away in the ship's boat. And that boat
            > was never seen again. But of course that was the same boat
            > that Aslan (he seems to be at the back of all the stories) pushed
            > ashore at the right place for Arsheesh to pick me up. I wish I
            > knew that knight's name, for he must have kept me alive and
            > starved himself to do it."
            > "I suppose Aslan would say that was part of someone else's
            > story," said Aravis.
            >
            > I feel like I should know the knight's name. I can think of nothing
            > from his usual sources: Bible, Arthurian lore, icelandic or classical
            > mythology... It is driving me crazy. Is anyone willing to hazard a
            > guess?
            >
            > Thanks much,
            >
            > Liz Katz
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > -------------------------------------
            > Liz Katz
            > 206 297-2724
            > lizkz@...
            > -------------------------------------
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > The Mythopoeic Society website http://www.mythsoc.org
            > Yahoo! Groups Links
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
          • Joshua Kronengold
            ... It s entirely possible*. However, what it most reminds me of is a certain character who exits, pursued by a bear (and is later described as being killed by
            Message 5 of 9 , Nov 24, 2004
              Elizabeth Apgar Triano writes, responding to Liz Katz:
              >> I feel like I should know the knight's name. I can think of nothing
              >> from his usual sources: Bible, Arthurian lore, icelandic or classical
              >> mythology... It is driving me crazy. Is anyone willing to hazard a
              >> guess?
              >Isn't there a story about a Scottish prince who is carried away Over the
              >Sea to Skye? I have only heard a folk song, and that not often.

              It's entirely possible*.

              However, what it most reminds me of is a certain character who exits,
              pursued by a bear (and is later described as being killed by same,
              IIRC).

              So I believe the knight's name is Antigonus, from A Winter's Tale (and
              ICMFP :).

              * aside from anything else, the Bard stole from a lot of earlier sources.

              --
              Joshua Kronengold (mneme@(io.com, labcats.org)) |\ _,,,--,,_ ,)
              --^-- "Get your mind right and you can make a stick /,`.-'`' -, ;-;;'
              /\\ your wand and the sky your hat and a puddle |,4- ) )-,_ ) /\
              /-\\\ your magic..." -- Granny Weatherwax '---''(_/--' (_/-'
            • Margaret Dean
              ... There is, but it s about Bonnie Prince Charlie, who was (AFAIK) fully adult at the time. There are =lots= of Scottish folk songs about Bonnie Prince
              Message 6 of 9 , Nov 24, 2004
                Elizabeth Apgar Triano wrote:
                >
                > Isn't there a story about a Scottish prince who is carried away Over the
                > Sea to Skye? I have only heard a folk song, and that not often.

                There is, but it's about Bonnie Prince Charlie, who was (AFAIK)
                fully adult at the time.

                There are =lots= of Scottish folk songs about Bonnie Prince
                Charlie.


                --Margaret Dean
                <margdean@...>
              • Liz Katz
                ... I like it... I am relieved. Thanks.
                Message 7 of 9 , Nov 24, 2004
                  >
                  > So I believe the knight's name is Antigonus, from A Winter's Tale (and
                  > ICMFP :).
                  >
                  I like it... I am relieved. Thanks.
                • Stolzi
                  ... Translate acronym please? I found out it stands for I Claim My Five Pounds, but don t know the reference. Diamond Proudbrook
                  Message 8 of 9 , Nov 25, 2004
                    > > So I believe the knight's name is Antigonus, from A Winter's Tale (and
                    > > ICMFP :).
                    > >

                    Translate acronym please?

                    I found out it stands for "I Claim My Five Pounds," but don't know the
                    reference.

                    Diamond Proudbrook
                  • WendellWag@aol.com
                    The allusion is probably to Graham Greene s novel _Brighton Rock_. There were contests held by British newspapers in the 1930 s where they would have someone
                    Message 9 of 9 , Nov 25, 2004
                      The allusion is probably to Graham Greene's novel _Brighton Rock_. There
                      were contests held by British newspapers in the 1930's where they would have
                      someone walk around a town on a given day. His name, his picture, the day, and
                      the town would be given in the paper. When a newspaper reader spotted him, they
                      would go up to him and say, "You're [whatever the name was] and I claim my
                      five pounds." They would thus win the contest. This is a plot point in
                      _Brighton Rock_. So the phrase now means, "Hah, I answered that question, didn't I?"

                      Wendell Wagner


                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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