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help with classics?

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  • Elizabeth Apgar Triano
    Hi, I thought my AVO quote was from Ovid, but apparently it is from Virgil. I guess I should read both. Where do I start, or shouldn t I bother? thanks,
    Message 1 of 11 , Nov 22, 2004
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      Hi,

      I thought my AVO quote was from Ovid, but apparently it is from Virgil. I
      guess I should read both. Where do I start, or shouldn't I bother?

      thanks,

      Lizzie


      Elizabeth Apgar Triano
      lizziewriter@...
      amor vincit omnia
      www.lizziewriter.com
    • Larry Swain
      One should always bother to read the classics. For Vergil s Aeneid, I prefer Mandelbaum s translation if you don t have Latin. For Ovid I d start wiyh the
      Message 2 of 11 , Nov 22, 2004
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        One should always bother to read the classics. For Vergil's Aeneid, I prefer Mandelbaum's translation if you don't have Latin. For Ovid I'd start wiyh the Metamorposes, then on to Amores, both I think available at Penguin.




































        >
        > Hi,
        >
        > I thought my AVO quote was from Ovid, but apparently it is from Virgil. I
        > guess I should read both. Where do I start, or shouldn't I bother?
        >
        > thanks,
        >
        > Lizzie
        >
        >
        > Elizabeth Apgar Triano
        > lizziewriter@...
        > amor vincit omnia
        > www.lizziewriter.com
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > The Mythopoeic Society website http://www.mythsoc.org
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >

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      • Vincent Ferré
        Well, if you are interested in Tolkien, I think you should read _the Aeneid_, given all the points the books have in common ! as well as with Homer s _Iliad_.
        Message 3 of 11 , Nov 23, 2004
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          Well, if you are interested in Tolkien, I think you should read _the Aeneid_, given all the points the books have in common ! as well as with Homer's _Iliad_. You're lucky : English translations of Greek and Latin works have an excellent reputation.
          (as far as Ovid is concerned, which books do you contemplate reading ?)

          Vincent

          >I thought my AVO quote was from Ovid, but apparently it is from Virgil. I
          guess I should read both. Where do I start, or shouldn't I bother?
          Lizzie

          >One should always bother to read the classics. For Vergil's Aeneid, I prefer Mandelbaum's translation if you don't have Latin. For Ovid I'd start wiyh the Metamorposes, then on to Amores, both I think available at Penguin.

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Elizabeth Apgar Triano
          Thanks, Larry and Vincent. Nope, no Latin. One should do a lot of things, but one does not always. One should dust more often, hereabouts. Elizabeth Apgar
          Message 4 of 11 , Nov 23, 2004
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            Thanks, Larry and Vincent. Nope, no Latin.

            One should do a lot of things, but one does not always. One should dust
            more often, hereabouts.

            Elizabeth Apgar Triano
            lizziewriter@...
            amor vincit omnia
            www.lizziewriter.com


            > [Original Message]
            > From: Larry Swain <theswain@...>
            > To: <mythsoc@yahoogroups.com>
            > Date: 11/23/2004 2:24:15 AM
            > Subject: Re: [mythsoc] help with classics?
            >
            >
            > One should always bother to read the classics. For Vergil's Aeneid, I
            prefer Mandelbaum's translation if you don't have Latin. For Ovid I'd
            start wiyh the Metamorposes, then on to Amores, both I think available at
            Penguin.
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            > >
            > > Hi,
            > >
            > > I thought my AVO quote was from Ovid, but apparently it is from Virgil.
            I
            > > guess I should read both. Where do I start, or shouldn't I bother?
            > >
            > > thanks,
            > >
            > > Lizzie
            > >
            > >
            > > Elizabeth Apgar Triano
            > > lizziewriter@...
            > > amor vincit omnia
            > > www.lizziewriter.com
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > The Mythopoeic Society website http://www.mythsoc.org
            > > Yahoo! Groups Links
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            >
            > --
            > _____________________________________________________________
            > Web-based SMS services available at http://www.operamail.com
            > From your mailbox to local or overseas cell phones.
            >
            > Powered by Outblaze
            >
            >
            >
            > The Mythopoeic Society website http://www.mythsoc.org
            > Yahoo! Groups Links
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
          • Croft, Janet B.
            And here I always thought you were quoting Chaucer. Here s something from a description of a ring engraved with amor vincit omnia : AMOR VINCIT OMNIA - The
            Message 5 of 11 , Nov 23, 2004
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              And here I always thought you were quoting Chaucer. Here's something
              from a description of a ring engraved with "amor vincit omnia":


              AMOR VINCIT OMNIA - The Latin phrase "Amor Vincit Omnia" translates as
              "love conquers all," a motto known to all English Literature students as
              the one engraved on the brooch worn by the Prioress in Chaucer's
              Canterbury Tales. The full quote from the Roman poet Virgil's Ecologues
              X, 69 dated to 38BC is "Omnia Vincit Amor et nos cedamus amori" or,
              "love conquers all; let us too, yield to love!"
              (http://www.sapphirelane.com/LOVE%20CONQUERS%20ALL%20RING.htm)


              From the Prlogue to The Canterbury Tales:

              She wore a small coral trinket on her arm
              A string of beads and gauded all with green;
              And therefrom hung a brooch of golden sheen
              Whereon there was engraved a crowned "A,"
              And under, Amor vincit omnia.


              Janet Brennan Croft
              -----Original Message-----
              From: Elizabeth Apgar Triano [mailto:lizziewriter@...]
              Sent: Monday, November 22, 2004 8:31 PM
              To: Mythsoc
              Subject: [mythsoc] help with classics?


              Hi,

              I thought my AVO quote was from Ovid, but apparently it is from Virgil.
              I guess I should read both. Where do I start, or shouldn't I bother?

              thanks,

              Lizzie


              Elizabeth Apgar Triano
              lizziewriter@...
              amor vincit omnia
              www.lizziewriter.com





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            • Elizabeth Apgar Triano
              lol yes, I can t help but wonder whether the reason so many people think I m quoting Ovid (myself included, I thought) is that, perhaps somewhere in that Tale
              Message 6 of 11 , Nov 23, 2004
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                lol yes, I can't help but wonder whether the reason so many people think
                I'm quoting Ovid (myself included, I thought) is that, perhaps somewhere in
                that Tale it mentions Ovid more than Virgil, and thus stuck in all our
                heads that way.

                I have seen amor vincit omnia often on jewelry, but only this year have I
                begun to see the entire quote reproduced. Even so, it has only been a
                matter of increasing the citation in the descriptive blurbs about products,
                and not on the items themselves.

                Whatever drives this market is probably related to the taste for LOTR
                goodies and other pretty items with pretty thoughts inscribed on them.

                Elizabeth Apgar Triano
                lizziewriter@...
                amor vincit omnia
                www.lizziewriter.com


                > [Original Message]
                > From: Croft, Janet B. <jbcroft@...>
                > To: <mythsoc@yahoogroups.com>
                > Date: 11/23/2004 9:13:46 AM
                > Subject: RE: [mythsoc] help with classics?
                >
                >
                > And here I always thought you were quoting Chaucer. Here's something
                > from a description of a ring engraved with "amor vincit omnia":
                >
                >
                > AMOR VINCIT OMNIA - The Latin phrase "Amor Vincit Omnia" translates as
                > "love conquers all," a motto known to all English Literature students as
                > the one engraved on the brooch worn by the Prioress in Chaucer's
                > Canterbury Tales. The full quote from the Roman poet Virgil's Ecologues
                > X, 69 dated to 38BC is "Omnia Vincit Amor et nos cedamus amori" or,
                > "love conquers all; let us too, yield to love!"
                > (http://www.sapphirelane.com/LOVE%20CONQUERS%20ALL%20RING.htm)
                >
                >
                > From the Prlogue to The Canterbury Tales:
                >
                > She wore a small coral trinket on her arm
                > A string of beads and gauded all with green;
                > And therefrom hung a brooch of golden sheen
                > Whereon there was engraved a crowned "A,"
                > And under, Amor vincit omnia.
                >
                >
                > Janet Brennan Croft
                > -----Original Message-----
                > From: Elizabeth Apgar Triano [mailto:lizziewriter@...]
                > Sent: Monday, November 22, 2004 8:31 PM
                > To: Mythsoc
                > Subject: [mythsoc] help with classics?
                >
                >
                > Hi,
                >
                > I thought my AVO quote was from Ovid, but apparently it is from Virgil.
                > I guess I should read both. Where do I start, or shouldn't I bother?
                >
                > thanks,
                >
                > Lizzie
                >
                >
                > Elizabeth Apgar Triano
                > lizziewriter@...
                > amor vincit omnia
                > www.lizziewriter.com
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > ------------------------ Yahoo! Groups Sponsor --------------------~-->
                > Make a clean sweep of pop-up ads. Yahoo! Companion Toolbar.
                > Now with Pop-Up Blocker. Get it for free!
                > http://us.click.yahoo.com/L5YrjA/eSIIAA/yQLSAA/DtIolB/TM
                > --------------------------------------------------------------------~->
                >
                > The Mythopoeic Society website http://www.mythsoc.org Yahoo! Groups
                > Links
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > The Mythopoeic Society website http://www.mythsoc.org
                > Yahoo! Groups Links
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
              • Larry Swain
                ... Dust rather than read!!?? Surely you jest!!!!!! One must have priorities!! ... -- _____________________________________________________________ Web-based
                Message 7 of 11 , Nov 23, 2004
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                  >
                  >
                  > Thanks, Larry and Vincent. Nope, no Latin.
                  >
                  > One should do a lot of things, but one does not always. One should dust
                  > more often, hereabouts.

                  Dust rather than read!!?? Surely you jest!!!!!! One must have priorities!!


                  > Elizabeth Apgar Triano
                  > lizziewriter@...
                  > amor vincit omnia
                  > www.lizziewriter.com
                  >
                  >
                  > > [Original Message]
                  > > From: Larry Swain <theswain@...>
                  > > To: <mythsoc@yahoogroups.com>
                  > > Date: 11/23/2004 2:24:15 AM
                  > > Subject: Re: [mythsoc] help with classics?
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > One should always bother to read the classics. For Vergil's Aeneid, I
                  > prefer Mandelbaum's translation if you don't have Latin. For Ovid I'd
                  > start wiyh the Metamorposes, then on to Amores, both I think available at
                  > Penguin.
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
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                  > >
                  > >
                  > > >
                  > > > Hi,
                  > > >
                  > > > I thought my AVO quote was from Ovid, but apparently it is from Virgil.
                  > I
                  > > > guess I should read both. Where do I start, or shouldn't I bother?
                  > > >
                  > > > thanks,
                  > > >
                  > > > Lizzie
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > > Elizabeth Apgar Triano
                  > > > lizziewriter@...
                  > > > amor vincit omnia
                  > > > www.lizziewriter.com
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > > The Mythopoeic Society website http://www.mythsoc.org
                  > > > Yahoo! Groups Links
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > >
                  > > --
                  > > _____________________________________________________________
                  > > Web-based SMS services available at http://www.operamail.com
                  > > From your mailbox to local or overseas cell phones.
                  > >
                  > > Powered by Outblaze
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > The Mythopoeic Society website http://www.mythsoc.org
                  > > Yahoo! Groups Links
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > The Mythopoeic Society website http://www.mythsoc.org
                  > Yahoo! Groups Links
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >

                  --
                  _____________________________________________________________
                  Web-based SMS services available at http://www.operamail.com
                  From your mailbox to local or overseas cell phones.

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                • WendellWag@aol.com
                  In a message dated 11/23/2004 9:49:15 AM Eastern Standard Time, ... Is Love conquers all really typical of Ovid s philosophy? For that matter, is it typical
                  Message 8 of 11 , Nov 24, 2004
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                    In a message dated 11/23/2004 9:49:15 AM Eastern Standard Time,
                    lizziewriter@... writes:

                    > lol yes, I can't help but wonder whether the reason so many people think
                    > I'm quoting Ovid (myself included, I thought) is that, perhaps somewhere in
                    > that Tale it mentions Ovid more than Virgil, and thus stuck in all our
                    > heads that way.

                    Is "Love conquers all" really typical of Ovid's philosophy? For that matter,
                    is it typical of Virgil's philosophy?

                    Wendell Wagner


                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Elizabeth Apgar Triano
                    You know, Wendell, the more one thinks about it . . . But I don t know. And the full quote, with therefore let us lose ourselves to love or in love or however
                    Message 9 of 11 , Nov 24, 2004
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                      You know, Wendell, the more one thinks about it . . . But I don't know.
                      And the full quote, with therefore let us lose ourselves to love or in love
                      or however it goes, is even more suspect. The short version could be
                      construed as agape or forgiveness or some such lofty philosophy... the long
                      version sounds more like that shepherd talking to his coy mistress.
                      Course, that uncertainty or dichotomy makes it all the more appealing to
                      me.

                      I suspect this (Virgil, Ovid) is reading I want to find at the library
                      before investing in my own copies.

                      Elizabeth Apgar Triano
                      lizziewriter@...
                      amor vincit omnia
                      www.lizziewriter.com


                      > [Original Message]
                      > From: <WendellWag@...>
                      > To: <mythsoc@yahoogroups.com>
                      > Date: 11/24/2004 10:40:59 AM
                      > Subject: Re: [mythsoc] help with classics?
                      >
                      >
                      > In a message dated 11/23/2004 9:49:15 AM Eastern Standard Time,
                      > lizziewriter@... writes:
                      >
                      > > lol yes, I can't help but wonder whether the reason so many people think
                      > > I'm quoting Ovid (myself included, I thought) is that, perhaps
                      somewhere in
                      > > that Tale it mentions Ovid more than Virgil, and thus stuck in all our
                      > > heads that way.
                      >
                      > Is "Love conquers all" really typical of Ovid's philosophy? For that
                      matter,
                      > is it typical of Virgil's philosophy?
                      >
                      > Wendell Wagner
                      >
                      >
                      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > The Mythopoeic Society website http://www.mythsoc.org
                      > Yahoo! Groups Links
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                    • WendellWag@aol.com
                      Love conquers all is a pretty vague statement that could be applied to a lot of different philosophies. To most modern people without a tradition of
                      Message 10 of 11 , Nov 24, 2004
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                        "Love conquers all" is a pretty vague statement that could be applied to a
                        lot of different philosophies. To most modern people without a tradition of
                        arranged marriages, it means just "I love you and you love me, so life is going
                        to be just hunky-dory from now on." To medieval people and perhaps to people
                        in ancient times, it was more about falling in love with someone whom your
                        social class or your already arranged marriage forbid you from marrying. To Ovid,
                        though, it apparently just meant "You think I'm kind of cute and I think
                        you're kind of cute, right? So let's do it right here and now. Why waste time
                        talking about it?" As much as I love "To His Coy Mistress" (and, really and
                        truly, it's my favorite poem), on some level it's a guy saying "You know you want
                        it, baby" to a girl.

                        Wendell Wagner


                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • Elizabeth Apgar Triano
                        Yup, it is, and didn t she give him a smart retort in someone else s poem somewhat later? Actually, who are you, and what did you do with Wendell? You re
                        Message 11 of 11 , Nov 24, 2004
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                          Yup, it is, and didn't she give him a smart retort in someone else's poem
                          somewhat later?

                          Actually, who are you, and what did you do with Wendell? You're gonna ruin
                          his reputation saying that that's his favorite poem.

                          Maybe someone who has actually read this stuff in recent memory could chime
                          in and tell us whether the Ars was written half in fun.

                          I'm still reading about the squid god -- or actually it's pie baking time.
                          Don't tell me that some of you get to gather at holiday meals with lots of
                          other book fiends for literary pow-wows, I think I'd about burst with envy.



                          Elizabeth Apgar Triano
                          lizziewriter@...
                          amor vincit omnia
                          www.lizziewriter.com


                          > [Original Message]
                          > From: <WendellWag@...>
                          > To: <mythsoc@yahoogroups.com>
                          > Date: 11/24/2004 11:38:33 AM
                          > Subject: Re: [mythsoc] help with classics?
                          >
                          >
                          > "Love conquers all" is a pretty vague statement that could be applied to
                          a
                          > lot of different philosophies. To most modern people without a tradition
                          of
                          > arranged marriages, it means just "I love you and you love me, so life is
                          going
                          > to be just hunky-dory from now on." To medieval people and perhaps to
                          people
                          > in ancient times, it was more about falling in love with someone whom
                          your
                          > social class or your already arranged marriage forbid you from marrying.
                          To Ovid,
                          > though, it apparently just meant "You think I'm kind of cute and I think
                          > you're kind of cute, right? So let's do it right here and now. Why
                          waste time
                          > talking about it?" As much as I love "To His Coy Mistress" (and, really
                          and
                          > truly, it's my favorite poem), on some level it's a guy saying "You know
                          you want
                          > it, baby" to a girl.
                          >
                          > Wendell Wagner
                          >
                          >
                          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > The Mythopoeic Society website http://www.mythsoc.org
                          > Yahoo! Groups Links
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
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