Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

The latest on homo perianensis

Expand Messages
  • steve
    Even the scientists are calling them Hobbits, and they feel there may be related but slightly different groups on neighboring isles. These of course would be
    Message 1 of 7 , Oct 28, 2004
    • 0 Attachment
      Even the scientists are calling them Hobbits, and they feel there may be
      related but slightly different groups on neighboring isles.

      These of course would be Stoors and Harfoots. (this isn't April 1st,
      I've checked)

      They suspect they were wiped out by a volcanic explosion 12,000 years
      ago, but local folktales suggest they were still alive when the Dutch
      colonized in the 1500s. They were a shy, secretive folk, after all.
    • Beth Russell
      The latest on homo perianensis I like your suggestion for a scientific name. Small correction: the suffix -ensis means from a certain place (e.g.,
      Message 2 of 7 , Oct 28, 2004
      • 0 Attachment
        "The latest on homo perianensis"


        I like your suggestion for a scientific name. Small correction: the
        suffix -ensis means "from a certain place" (e.g., neandertalensis for
        the Neanderthal folk because the first description was based on bones
        from the Neandertal valley in Germany).

        I think "periannath" would be a noun in apposition to the genus name
        Homo. If the root "perian" were Latinized in the second declension then
        the species name would be Homo perianus. This form of the word might
        have an unfortunate impression in English.

        There are two alternatives that end up with a better result. First,
        "perian" could be considered a third declension noun with no nominitave
        singular termination to the root. Or, since "perian" is a Sindarin
        word, it could be taken up unchanged as a foreign word. In each case
        the name would be Homo perian.

        Some of the reports say that the scientists are not sure the bones are
        correctly classified in the genus Homo. If not, then perhaps the genus
        name might be Perian. The specific epithet "floresiensis" already used
        would have to be transferred to the new genus for reasons of priority of
        nomenclature, the result being Perian floresiensis.

        Cheers,

        Beth














        The Mythopoeic Society website http://www.mythsoc.org
        Yahoo! Groups Links
      • alexeik@aol.com
        In a message dated 10/28/4 5:05:59 PM, sschaper wrote:
        Message 3 of 7 , Oct 28, 2004
        • 0 Attachment
          In a message dated 10/28/4 5:05:59 PM, sschaper wrote:

          <<They suspect they were wiped out by a volcanic explosion 12,000 years
          ago, but local folktales suggest they were still alive when the Dutch
          colonized in the 1500s. They were a shy, secretive folk, after all.
          >>

          They're a common feature in Malay folklore, where they're called _orang
          pendek_ ("short people"), and there are many records of sightings within living
          memory. They've always been described pretty much as the new archaeological
          findings have them -- which suggests that the legend has been substantiated by
          science.
          Alexei
        • Beth Russell
          They re a common feature in Malay folklore, where they re called _orang pendek_ ( short people ), and there are many records of sightings within living
          Message 4 of 7 , Oct 28, 2004
          • 0 Attachment
            "They're a common feature in Malay folklore, where they're called _orang

            pendek_ ("short people"), and there are many records of sightings within
            living memory. They've always been described pretty much as the new
            archaeological findings have them -- which suggests that the legend has
            been substantiated by science."



            And if some are ever found alive, the scientific classification will be
            really, really important. If they are "Homo", we send them to school.
            If they are "Perian", they go to the zoo.

            Cheers,

            Beth



            The Mythopoeic Society website http://www.mythsoc.org
            Yahoo! Groups Links
          • Alan Kellogg
            ... Not quite. According to those who are studying the orang pendak it s appearance is more that of an orang utang with an upright posture. They are also
            Message 5 of 7 , Oct 28, 2004
            • 0 Attachment
              >In a message dated 10/28/4 5:05:59 PM, sschaper wrote:
              >
              ><<They suspect they were wiped out by a volcanic explosion 12,000 years
              >ago, but local folktales suggest they were still alive when the Dutch
              >colonized in the 1500s. They were a shy, secretive folk, after all.
              >>>
              >
              >They're a common feature in Malay folklore, where they're called _orang
              >pendek_ ("short people"), and there are many records of sightings
              >within living
              >memory. They've always been described pretty much as the new archaeological
              >findings have them -- which suggests that the legend has been substantiated by
              >science.
              >Alexei

              Not quite. According to those who are studying the orang pendak it's
              appearance is more that of an orang utang with an upright posture.
              They are also around 5 feet tall according to the accounts. H.
              Floresiensis only got to about 3 feet in height. The orang pendak is
              also not known to be a tool maker or fire user.
              --
              Alan Kellogg

              http://www.mythusmage.com

              mailto:mythusmage@...
            • alexeik@aol.com
              In a message dated 10/28/4 7:26:24 PM, Alan Kellogg wrote:
              Message 6 of 7 , Oct 29, 2004
              • 0 Attachment
                In a message dated 10/28/4 7:26:24 PM, Alan Kellogg wrote:

                <<Not quite. According to those who are studying the orang pendak it's
                appearance is more that of an orang utang with an upright posture.
                They are also around 5 feet tall according to the accounts. H.
                Floresiensis only got to about 3 feet in height. The orang pendak is
                also not known to be a tool maker or fire user.
                >>

                This doesn't jibe with the many stories I've heard about the _orang pendek_
                (not "pendak"). The account of their height varies, but they're usually
                described as much more human-like than orangutans -- notably, in many cases, as
                having a full head of long hair. It's true that I've never heard of their using
                fire, but there are stories where they throw darts. I suspect you're dealing with
                a particular local tradition.
                Alexei
              • Alan Kellogg
                ... Could be. Then again, Indonesia is home to many peoples, with many tales and legends. The archipelago was also home to modern humans long before the modern
                Message 7 of 7 , Oct 29, 2004
                • 0 Attachment
                  >In a message dated 10/28/4 7:26:24 PM, Alan Kellogg wrote:
                  >
                  ><<Not quite. According to those who are studying the orang pendak it's
                  >appearance is more that of an orang utang with an upright posture.
                  >They are also around 5 feet tall according to the accounts. H.
                  >Floresiensis only got to about 3 feet in height. The orang pendak is
                  >also not known to be a tool maker or fire user.
                  >>>
                  >
                  >This doesn't jibe with the many stories I've heard about the _orang pendek_
                  >(not "pendak"). The account of their height varies, but they're usually
                  >described as much more human-like than orangutans -- notably, in
                  >many cases, as
                  >having a full head of long hair. It's true that I've never heard of
                  >their using
                  >fire, but there are stories where they throw darts. I suspect you're
                  >dealing with
                  >a particular local tradition.
                  >Alexei

                  Could be. Then again, Indonesia is home to many peoples, with many
                  tales and legends. The archipelago was also home to modern humans
                  long before the modern Indonesian came along, so the local stories of
                  little people etc. may well come from stories of encounters by the
                  early immigrants with the aborigines. Puzzling out the facts from a
                  maze of tales can get frustrating.
                  --
                  Alan Kellogg

                  http://www.mythusmage.com

                  mailto:mythusmage@...
                Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.