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Shadowmancer

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  • Elizabeth Apgar Triano
    Has anyone read Graham Taylor s _Shadowmancer_? I just saw a review and wondered... I can look it up on amazon but I also wanted to hear from real people.
    Message 1 of 13 , Aug 26, 2004
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      Has anyone read Graham Taylor's _Shadowmancer_? I just saw a review and
      wondered... I can look it up on amazon but I also wanted to hear from real
      people.

      Lizzie


      Elizabeth Apgar Triano
      lizziewriter@...
      amor vincit omnia
      *** Do visit www.groups.yahoo.com/group/DollsandArts ***
    • Jack
      ... A bit. It wasn t very well written. We reviewed it. I suspect atht was teh review you read.
      Message 2 of 13 , Aug 26, 2004
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        >Has anyone read Graham Taylor's _Shadowmancer_? I just saw a review and
        >wondered... I can look it up on amazon but I also wanted to hear from real
        >people.

        A bit. It wasn't very well written.

        We reviewed it. I suspect atht was teh review you read.
      • Elizabeth Apgar Triano
        Naw, I am ashamed to confess I haven t been to greenman in quite some time. I saw first the review in Episcopal Life (a back issue), and then the reviews at
        Message 3 of 13 , Aug 26, 2004
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          Naw, I am ashamed to confess I haven't been to greenman in quite some time.
          I saw first the review in Episcopal Life (a back issue), and then the
          reviews at amazon. I will have to find the book myself and have a peek...
          reviews were all over... it's not so bad; it's unbearably preachy; it's too
          busy; it's for young readers... I suspect after all that many of my own YA
          favorites would seem different if I were to read them again today. This,
          however, was written "today," so ... anyway, I will surf over to Greenman
          for a peek.

          Case in point: we are reading Doctor Dolittle at bedtime. Last night we
          finished up Doctor Dolittle's Circus. Among the many things that make this
          series very non-PC is the way they used the word "stupid" twice in one
          paragraph, and a third time a few paragraphs prior. Just a little thing,
          but it stands out nowadays.

          Elizabeth Apgar Triano
          lizziewriter@...
          amor vincit omnia
          *** Do visit www.groups.yahoo.com/group/DollsandArts ***


          > [Original Message]
          > From: Jack <jack@...>
          > To: <mythsoc@yahoogroups.com>
          > Date: 8/26/2004 5:10:33 PM
          > Subject: Re: [mythsoc] Shadowmancer
          >
          > >Has anyone read Graham Taylor's _Shadowmancer_? I just saw a review and
          > >wondered... I can look it up on amazon but I also wanted to hear from
          real
          > >people.
          >
          > A bit. It wasn't very well written.
          >
          > We reviewed it. I suspect atht was teh review you read.
          >
          >
          >
          > The Mythopoeic Society website http://www.mythsoc.org
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
          >
        • Elizabeth Apgar Triano
          Wow... I hadn t realized you had so Many book reviews over there. Shadowmancer s was very useful, thanks. Sure is quiet here... although I should check into
          Message 4 of 13 , Aug 26, 2004
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            Wow... I hadn't realized you had so Many book reviews over there.
            Shadowmancer's was very useful, thanks.

            Sure is quiet here... although I should check into that Earthsea thing.
            Still, the thought of Earthsea on the screen is a bit repulsive. jmho of
            course

            Lizzie

            Elizabeth Apgar Triano
            lizziewriter@...
            amor vincit omnia
            *** Do visit www.groups.yahoo.com/group/DollsandArts ***


            > [Original Message]
            > From: Jack <jack@...>
            > To: <mythsoc@yahoogroups.com>
            > Date: 8/26/2004 5:10:33 PM
            > Subject: Re: [mythsoc] Shadowmancer
            >
            > >Has anyone read Graham Taylor's _Shadowmancer_? I just saw a review and
            > >wondered... I can look it up on amazon but I also wanted to hear from
            real
            > >people.
            >
            > A bit. It wasn't very well written.
            >
            > We reviewed it. I suspect atht was teh review you read.
            >
            >
            >
            > The Mythopoeic Society website http://www.mythsoc.org
            > Yahoo! Groups Links
            >
            >
            >
            >
          • Jack
            ... We stopped counting reviews (total) after the first 10,000 things we had looked at. We think rebiewed reiewed some 4,000 or so books. ... I agree.
            Message 5 of 13 , Aug 26, 2004
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              >Wow... I hadn't realized you had so Many book reviews over there.
              >Shadowmancer's was very useful, thanks.

              We stopped counting reviews (total) after the first 10,000 things we had looked at.

              We think rebiewed reiewed some 4,000 or so books.

              >Sure is quiet here... although I should check into that Earthsea thing.
              >Still, the thought of Earthsea on the screen is a bit repulsive. jmho of
              >course

              I agree. Earthsea's a literay work that is even more difficultfor me than LoTR to visua;lize
              being done correctly.
            • jamcconney@aol.com
              I ran across this article and remembered someone was asking about Shadowmancer the other day, so this may be of interest.... Anne UK vicar turned
              Message 6 of 13 , Aug 26, 2004
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                I ran across this article and remembered someone was asking about
                'Shadowmancer' the other day, so this may be of interest....
                Anne


                UK vicar turned best-selling author sees writing as part of his ministry
                London

                by Cedric Pulford
                ENI-04-0359
                Friday, June 11, 2004
                [Ecumenical News International] Both books tackle the largest of themes -
                the attempted overthrow of God by the forces of darkness. Gutsy teenagers pull
                off feats of derring-do against a terrifying array of evil spirits, with help
                from the Archangel Raphael in disguise.

                Taylor says his writing is like the popular British yeast-based sandwich
                spread, Marmite, “you either like it or you hate it”.

                In an interview with Ecumenical News International, Taylor said he can write
                “a page in 10 minutes” (at least 300 words), which many writers would see
                as an hour’s work. He can do this because he has already written it in his
                head. “Ideas are bubbling through my head [all day] ... I carry a notepad so I
                can put down any ideas that come to me.”

                He finds writing a “great way of relaxing”. As a vicar he has had to work
                up to 90 hours a week. “Writing sorted me out. It made me look at my ministry.”


                Asked if he saw writing as part of his Christian ministry, Taylor said: “
                Everything I do is ministry. Walking down the street. Talking to neighbours.
                Even being taken to lunch at the Ivy [a top London restaurant]!

                ”It’s going about your life and being a Christian.”

                His dual life will, however, come to an end in October when he retires as
                vicar of Cloughton. This is not, Taylor, 46, explained, to free up more time for
                writing but because of a heart condition. He was in hospital three times in
                the past year, and felt himself near to death.

                He and his wife and three daughters have just moved into a new home. It is a
                four-bedroom detached house on a huge housing estate “like hundreds of others
                ”. It is comfortable but well short of the mansion that his current income
                would allow or that his writing rival, Harry Potter creator J. K. Rowling,
                enjoys.

                Before being ordained in 1995, Taylor was a pop music promoter, a social
                worker and a policeman. For much of his life his idea of luxury was to have “two
                pairs of black shoes”, and he says a mansion “would not be a good use of God’
                s money”.

                He said he loves leading the “growing, thriving” parish of Cloughton. He
                does not know what his plans are after he retires, “but God has sorted it out;
                it will be working in a different way”.

                He has never met J. K. Rowling, and did not manage to contact her last year
                when he wanted advice on handling the role of a celebrity author with a young
                family. However, he got “kind and generous and helpful” advice from Philip
                Pullman, the atheist author who has been praised by the Archbishop of
                Canterbury for making people think about spiritual matters.

                Taylor’s first book, Shadowmancer, has had a substantial sale among adults,
                and Taylor does not see himself as a writer only for children. He regrets that
                bookshop and chart pressures mean that books have to be “put into boxes”.

                ”There’s no space for just books anymore,” he said. “How do you market Mark
                Twain or William Golding [author of Lord of the Flies], for example?”

                Although Taylor had been lecturing on the supernatural for years before
                becoming a priest, his interest was sharpened by his first church appointment.
                This was at St Mary’s, Whitby, which features in Bram Stoker’s vampire novel,
                Dracula.

                Taylor’s own books abound with ghastly creatures that vie with Dracula for
                horror: a Dunamez (a being that takes over human bodies), a Diakka (a fallen
                angel) and a Sekaris (a creature conjured into life from inert materials).

                He believes that evil spirits exist and can interact with human beings. He
                has performed many exorcisms.

                ”I don’t like the word ‘exorcisms’. I prefer to call them blessings. It is
                inviting the positive in rather than driving the negative out. Evil spirits
                feed on human tragedy and negativity.”



                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Ted Sherman
                I first read Shadowmancer on a trip to England last year--although the writing is not the best, I thought the story was very good. I am one of the odd ones who
                Message 7 of 13 , Aug 27, 2004
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                  I first read Shadowmancer on a trip to England last year--although the
                  writing is not the best, I thought the story was very good. I am one of the
                  odd ones who think, in fact, that Shadowmancer is very good. Taylor reminds
                  me of a mix of Pullman (when he's good), Lewis (think That Hideous
                  Strength), and Charles Williams (novels).

                  His second novel, Wormwood, is not as good, but it still has much that is
                  worthwhile.

                  The major problem that I have with Taylor's novels, and we discussed this at
                  the recent Landscapes with Angels conference in Oxford, is that they lack
                  humor. That is, there's nothing light in them, no lightheartedness--everyone
                  and everything is just so darned serious that the stories aren't 'fun.'

                  Ted
                • dianejoy@earthlink.net
                  Have it but have not read it yet. Brit edition. Sorry. ---djb ... From: Elizabeth Apgar Triano lizziewriter@earthlink.net Date: Thu, 26 Aug 2004 16:59:47
                  Message 8 of 13 , Aug 27, 2004
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                    Have it but have not read it yet. Brit edition. Sorry. ---djb

                    Original Message:
                    -----------------
                    From: Elizabeth Apgar Triano lizziewriter@...
                    Date: Thu, 26 Aug 2004 16:59:47 -0400
                    To: Mythsoc@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject: [mythsoc] Shadowmancer


                    Has anyone read Graham Taylor's _Shadowmancer_? I just saw a review and
                    wondered... I can look it up on amazon but I also wanted to hear from real
                    people.

                    Lizzie


                    Elizabeth Apgar Triano
                    lizziewriter@...
                    amor vincit omnia
                    *** Do visit www.groups.yahoo.com/group/DollsandArts ***






                    The Mythopoeic Society website http://www.mythsoc.org
                    Yahoo! Groups Links






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                  • Elizabeth Apgar Triano
                    They lack humour... ?? Wow... Joshua, what do you say to this charge? Lizzie Elizabeth Apgar Triano lizziewriter@earthlink.net amor vincit omnia ... the ...
                    Message 9 of 13 , Aug 27, 2004
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                      They lack humour... ?? Wow...

                      Joshua, what do you say to this charge?

                      Lizzie

                      Elizabeth Apgar Triano
                      lizziewriter@...
                      amor vincit omnia
                      *** Do visit www.groups.yahoo.com/group/DollsandArts ***


                      > [Original Message]
                      > From: Ted Sherman <tedsherman@...>
                      > To: Mythopoeic Society discussion list <mythsoc@yahoogroups.com>
                      > Date: 8/27/2004 9:29:36 AM
                      > Subject: [mythsoc] Shadowmancer
                      >
                      > I first read Shadowmancer on a trip to England last year--although the
                      > writing is not the best, I thought the story was very good. I am one of
                      the
                      > odd ones who think, in fact, that Shadowmancer is very good. Taylor
                      reminds
                      > me of a mix of Pullman (when he's good), Lewis (think That Hideous
                      > Strength), and Charles Williams (novels).
                      >
                      > His second novel, Wormwood, is not as good, but it still has much that is
                      > worthwhile.
                      >
                      > The major problem that I have with Taylor's novels, and we discussed this
                      at
                      > the recent Landscapes with Angels conference in Oxford, is that they lack
                      > humor. That is, there's nothing light in them, no
                      lightheartedness--everyone
                      > and everything is just so darned serious that the stories aren't 'fun.'
                      >
                      > Ted
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > The Mythopoeic Society website http://www.mythsoc.org
                      > Yahoo! Groups Links
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                    • Joshua Ellis
                      ... Lizzie and I were talking about Shadowmancer off-list, so I assume this question was directed at me. The book did not completely lack lightheartedness or
                      Message 10 of 13 , Aug 27, 2004
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                        >> The major problem that I have with Taylor's novels,
                        >> and we discussed this at the recent Landscapes with
                        >> Angels conference in Oxford, is that they lack
                        >> humor. That is, there's nothing light in them, no
                        >> lightheartedness--everyone and everything is just
                        >> so darned serious that the stories aren't 'fun.'

                        > They lack humour... ?? Wow...

                        > Joshua, what do you say to this charge?

                        Lizzie and I were talking about Shadowmancer off-list, so I assume this
                        question was directed at me. The book did not completely lack
                        lightheartedness or humor -- the bit in the middle at the Boggle Mill
                        comes to mind -- but the story was dark and most of the characters earnest
                        from beginning to end. That did not, though, cause me to think the story
                        wasn't fun. I'd say it was "differently entertaining."

                        -joshua
                        --
                        ===[Joshua Ellis]===============[S-D-G]===============[-0.809016994]===
                        josh@... -+- http://www.apostate.com/ -+- LJ:deteriorata
                        | There were only two types of stories: the ones where the |
                        | characters begin unhappy and end happy, which are the ones that |
                        | sell, and the ones where they begin happy and end unhappy, which |
                        | are the ones English majors read. |
                        Currently Reading: "Wittgenstein's Poker" by Edmonds and Eidinow
                      • Elizabeth Apgar Triano
                        Thanks.... this article seems more marketing-driven than otherwise. Or is that just me? What is the other book mentioned in the beginning of this article?
                        Message 11 of 13 , Aug 27, 2004
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                          Thanks.... this article seems more marketing-driven than otherwise. Or is
                          that just me? What is the "other" book mentioned in the beginning of this
                          article?

                          best

                          Lizzie

                          Elizabeth Apgar Triano
                          lizziewriter@...
                          amor vincit omnia
                          *** Do visit www.groups.yahoo.com/group/DollsandArts ***


                          > [Original Message]
                          > From: <jamcconney@...>
                          > To: <mythsoc@yahoogroups.com>
                          > Date: 8/27/2004 12:16:26 AM
                          > Subject: [mythsoc] RE: Shadowmancer
                          >
                          > I ran across this article and remembered someone was asking about
                          > 'Shadowmancer' the other day, so this may be of interest....
                          > Anne
                          >
                          >
                          > UK vicar turned best-selling author sees writing as part of his ministry
                          > London
                          >
                          > by Cedric Pulford
                          > ENI-04-0359
                          > Friday, June 11, 2004
                          > [Ecumenical News International] Both books tackle the largest of themes
                          -
                          > the attempted overthrow of God by the forces of darkness. Gutsy
                          teenagers pull
                          > off feats of derring-do against a terrifying array of evil spirits, with
                          help
                          > from the Archangel Raphael in disguise.
                          >
                          > Taylor says his writing is like the popular British yeast-based sandwich
                          > spread, Marmite, ���you either like it or you hate it���.
                          >
                          > In an interview with Ecumenical News International, Taylor said he can
                          write
                          > ���a page in 10 minutes��� (at least 300 words), which many writers would
                          see
                          > as an hour���s work. He can do this because he has already written it in
                          his
                          > head. ���Ideas are bubbling through my head [all day] ... I carry a
                          notepad so I
                          > can put down any ideas that come to me.���
                          >
                          > He finds writing a ���great way of relaxing���. As a vicar he has had to
                          work
                          > up to 90 hours a week. ���Writing sorted me out. It made me look at my
                          ministry.���
                          >
                          >
                          > Asked if he saw writing as part of his Christian ministry, Taylor said:
                          ���
                          > Everything I do is ministry. Walking down the street. Talking to
                          neighbours.
                          > Even being taken to lunch at the Ivy [a top London restaurant]!
                          >
                          > ���It���s going about your life and being a Christian.���
                          >
                          > His dual life will, however, come to an end in October when he retires as

                          > vicar of Cloughton. This is not, Taylor, 46, explained, to free up more
                          time for
                          > writing but because of a heart condition. He was in hospital three times
                          in
                          > the past year, and felt himself near to death.
                          >
                          > He and his wife and three daughters have just moved into a new home. It
                          is a
                          > four-bedroom detached house on a huge housing estate ���like hundreds of
                          others
                          > ���. It is comfortable but well short of the mansion that his current
                          income
                          > would allow or that his writing rival, Harry Potter creator J. K.
                          Rowling,
                          > enjoys.
                          >
                          > Before being ordained in 1995, Taylor was a pop music promoter, a social
                          > worker and a policeman. For much of his life his idea of luxury was to
                          have ���two
                          > pairs of black shoes���, and he says a mansion ���would not be a good use
                          of God���
                          > s money���.
                          >
                          > He said he loves leading the ���growing, thriving��� parish of Cloughton.
                          He
                          > does not know what his plans are after he retires, ���but God has sorted
                          it out;
                          > it will be working in a different way���.
                          >
                          > He has never met J. K. Rowling, and did not manage to contact her last
                          year
                          > when he wanted advice on handling the role of a celebrity author with a
                          young
                          > family. However, he got ���kind and generous and helpful��� advice from
                          Philip
                          > Pullman, the atheist author who has been praised by the Archbishop of
                          > Canterbury for making people think about spiritual matters.
                          >
                          > Taylor���s first book, Shadowmancer, has had a substantial sale among
                          adults,
                          > and Taylor does not see himself as a writer only for children. He regrets
                          that
                          > bookshop and chart pressures mean that books have to be ���put into
                          boxes���.
                          >
                          > ���There���s no space for just books anymore,��� he said. ���How do you
                          market Mark
                          > Twain or William Golding [author of Lord of the Flies], for example?���
                          >
                          > Although Taylor had been lecturing on the supernatural for years before
                          > becoming a priest, his interest was sharpened by his first church
                          appointment.
                          > This was at St Mary���s, Whitby, which features in Bram Stoker���s
                          vampire novel,
                          > Dracula.
                          >
                          > Taylor���s own books abound with ghastly creatures that vie with Dracula
                          for
                          > horror: a Dunamez (a being that takes over human bodies), a Diakka (a
                          fallen
                          > angel) and a Sekaris (a creature conjured into life from inert
                          materials).
                          >
                          > He believes that evil spirits exist and can interact with human beings.
                          He
                          > has performed many exorcisms.
                          >
                          > ���I don���t like the word ���exorcisms���. I prefer to call them
                          blessings. It is
                          > inviting the positive in rather than driving the negative out. Evil
                          spirits
                          > feed on human tragedy and negativity.���
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > The Mythopoeic Society website http://www.mythsoc.org
                          > Yahoo! Groups Links
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                        • jamcconney@aol.com
                          In a message dated 8/27/2004 4:10:59 PM Central Standard Time, lizziewriter@earthlink.net writes: Thanks.... this article seems more marketing-driven than
                          Message 12 of 13 , Aug 27, 2004
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                            In a message dated 8/27/2004 4:10:59 PM Central Standard Time,
                            lizziewriter@... writes:

                            Thanks.... this article seems more marketing-driven than otherwise. Or is
                            that just me? What is the "other" book mentioned in the beginning of this
                            article?



                            I don't know--I assume the 'other book' is the second in the series. I came
                            across this article while looking for something quite different and it seems
                            to be an article based on an interview that may have been on television. It
                            really leaves out a lot that one would rather had not been left out.

                            This isn't an author I've gotten around to yet, so the whole discussion has
                            me curious enough to plan on searching out 'Shadowmancer' on my next trip to
                            the library. In short, I ain't no expert nohow.

                            Anne


                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          • Jack
                            ... There is indeed a second book in the series as we got the ARC last week.
                            Message 13 of 13 , Aug 27, 2004
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                              >I don't know--I assume the 'other book' is the second in the series. I came
                              >across this article while looking for something quite different and it seems
                              >to be an article based on an interview that may have been on television. It
                              >really leaves out a lot that one would rather had not been left out.

                              There is indeed a second book in the series as we got the ARC last week.
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