Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Laurel Hamilton's books

Expand Messages
  • David Lenander
    Several of my co-workers read her books, and in fact, one gave me the first three to take home to my daughter, Claire, who likes Buffy the Vampire Slayer.
    Message 1 of 6 , Jul 17, 2004
    • 0 Attachment
      Several of my co-workers read her books, and in fact, one gave me the
      first three to take home to my daughter, Claire, who likes Buffy the
      Vampire Slayer. Claire has read all of the vampire series, now, even
      though my co-worker expressed concern, as he read more of the series,
      that they were turning into pornography. I cautioned Claire, but she
      kept on reading them. She hasn't read the other series, Elves in
      America, and upon learning that they had gone even farther into Cosmo
      Porn territory (porn plus clothing) she seems not anxious to try them.
      I'm not sure, but the Chelsea Quinn Yarbro series, which is more
      "historical horror" with the horror attached to real historical
      figures, like Savanarolla (Hm, how was his name spelled?), in contrast
      to the comparatively heroic and nice vampire, probably would strike
      Claire as too dull and slow-moving, though I might try one on her if I
      can find my copy of _Hotel Trannsylvania_, the first in the series, as
      I continue to gradually open boxes of books that have been packed up
      for years. According to the book on Vampire fictions that was a
      finalist for the MSA, the series doesn't really hit its stride for
      another book or two, by the way. There is definitely a romance novel
      side to the St. Germaine series, perhaps shading into soft porn at
      times, but the horror is pretty toned down (except for the history,
      which may be more horrifying for being essentially true). I've only
      read about five of them, and I remember skipping _Blood Games_ because
      people said it was so much more bloody and nasty than the others, being
      set in ancient Rome at the site of the contests where Christians faced
      lions and gladiators butchered each other. Also, it's earlier in St.
      Germaine's long unlife, when he hadn't mellowed so much to the pleasant
      monster he was to become.
      On Jul 17, 2004, at 7:23 AM, mythsoc@yahoogroups.com wrote:

      > Message: 13
      > Date: Fri, 16 Jul 2004 19:21:47 GMT
      > From: "jtheyman@..." <JTHeyman@...>
      > Subject: Re: Laurel K Hamilton
      >
      >
      > The first of her vampire books is (appropriately enough) "Guilty
      > Pleasures". The next 4 or 5 get progressively more like
      > horror/pornography instead of fantasy/alternate reality (in my
      > opinion) and I eventually stopped reading them. I have no idea if she
      > still writes that way, but the first two or three weren't *too* bad.
      >
      > The first of her elves in America books is "A Kiss of Shadows" and
      > begins in a style more porn than fantasy (in my opinion) and I only
      > read the first one.
      >
      > ~ JTHeyman
      >
      David Lenander
      d-lena@...
      2095 Hamline Ave. N.
      Roseville, MN 55113
      651-292-8887
      http://www.umn.edu/~d-lena/RIVENDELL.html
    • David Bratman
      ... Savonarola. But I m commenting not for that but to point out that St. Germain, Yarbro s vampire, is himself a real historical figure: a diplomat,
      Message 2 of 6 , Jul 17, 2004
      • 0 Attachment
        At 10:41 AM 7/17/2004 -0500, David Lenander wrote:

        >I'm not sure, but the Chelsea Quinn Yarbro series, which is more
        >"historical horror" with the horror attached to real historical
        >figures, like Savanarolla (Hm, how was his name spelled?)

        Savonarola. But I'm commenting not for that but to point out that St.
        Germain, Yarbro's vampire, is himself a real historical figure: a diplomat,
        occultist, and composer (the last may have been how Yarbro, a composer
        herself, first came across him) in pre-revolutionary France. A man of
        mysterious origins and rumors of extended lifespan, he was a good candidate
        to turn into a fictional vampire.

        - David Bratman
      • Elizabeth Apgar Triano
        Oh.... Saint-Germain (Yarbro) isn t soft-porn or whatever at all. Well, not really. There is the sensuality thing, but I think it s done pretty well. He s
        Message 3 of 6 , Jul 17, 2004
        • 0 Attachment
          Oh.... Saint-Germain (Yarbro) isn't soft-porn or whatever at all. Well,
          not really. There is the sensuality thing, but I think it's done pretty
          well. He's not a sociopath like Lestat.

          Of the few I have read so far, I would recommend _Better in the Dark_. I
          don't think that _Hotel Transylvania_ lives up to its reputation, although
          there is a good saves-the-day scene in it, sure. I am currently reading
          _Darker Jewels_, which takes place in Russia, and am finding it hard going,
          because of all the Russian-novel type trappings (names and unfamiliar
          clothing). Challenging, anyway, but rewarding. And I think you may be
          right in your assessment of being too slow moving for some. This is
          definitely not something you read for the action aspect. And I have no
          idea how to spell Savonarola.

          Lizzie

          Elizabeth Apgar Triano
          lizziewriter@...
          amor vincit omnia
          *** Do visit www.groups.yahoo.com/group/DollsandArts ***
        • Elizabeth Apgar Triano
          Message 4 of 6 , Jul 17, 2004
          • 0 Attachment
            << There is definitely a romance novel
            side to the St. Germaine series, perhaps shading into soft porn at
            times, but the horror is pretty toned down (except for the history,
            which may be more horrifying for being essentially true). >>

            YES. The frightening sides of history. Things when drawn into stories are
            so much more fearful than just dry in classrooms. What about Willis'
            _Doomsday Book_? (I never get the title right, but I might have this
            time.) Plague and flu and characterization... amazing. _Better in the
            Dark_ introduced me to ergotism, something really not covered in my history
            classes. I want to learn more about that !

            Lizzie

            Elizabeth Apgar Triano
            lizziewriter@...
            amor vincit omnia
            *** Do visit www.groups.yahoo.com/group/DollsandArts ***
          • Elizabeth Apgar Triano
            ... Yes, David, real I guess, and shrouded in mystery. Kind of like Arthur. Is there much that we actually know about the historical St. Germain? Lizzie
            Message 5 of 6 , Jul 17, 2004
            • 0 Attachment
              >Savonarola. But I'm commenting not for that but to point out that St.
              >Germain, Yarbro's vampire, is himself a real historical figure: a diplomat,
              >occultist, and composer (the last may have been how Yarbro, a composer
              >herself, first came across him) in pre-revolutionary France. A man of
              >mysterious origins and rumors of extended lifespan, he was a good candidate
              >to turn into a fictional vampire.

              Yes, David, real I guess, and shrouded in mystery. Kind of like Arthur.
              Is there much that we actually "know" about the historical St. Germain?

              Lizzie

              Elizabeth Apgar Triano
              lizziewriter@...
              amor vincit omnia
              *** Do visit www.groups.yahoo.com/group/DollsandArts ***
            • David Bratman
              ... There are accounts by those who knew him. They don t tell his origins or even his name (he s just called le Comte de Saint-Germain, a title he probably
              Message 6 of 6 , Jul 17, 2004
              • 0 Attachment
                At 01:28 PM 7/17/2004 -0400, Lizzie wrote:

                >Yes, David, real I guess, and shrouded in mystery. Kind of like Arthur.
                >Is there much that we actually "know" about the historical St. Germain?

                There are accounts by those who knew him. They don't tell his origins or
                even his name (he's just called le Comte de Saint-Germain, a title he
                probably had no right to), but we know more about him as a person than we
                do about Arthur, a man whose complete historical record is two or three
                sentences long, and could be legibly printed on a large postage stamp.

                - David Bratman
              Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.