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Re: Laurel K. Hamilton

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  • Joe R. Christopher
    ... Back when I was teaching, I directed a master s thesis on vampire fiction for a student--and he was much taken by Hamilton s vampire stories. I had read
    Message 1 of 3 , Jul 17, 2004
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      >
      >Message: 13
      > Date: Fri, 16 Jul 2004 19:21:47 GMT
      > From: "jtheyman@..." <JTHeyman@...>
      >Subject: Re: Laurel K Hamilton
      >
      >
      >The first of her vampire books is (appropriately enough) "Guilty
      >Pleasures". The next 4 or 5 get progressively more like
      >horror/pornography instead of fantasy/alternate reality (in my opinion)
      >and I eventually stopped reading them. I have no idea if she still writes
      >that way, but the first two or three weren't *too* bad.
      >
      >The first of her elves in America books is "A Kiss of Shadows" and begins
      >in a style more porn than fantasy (in my opinion) and I only read the
      >first one.
      >
      >~ JTHeyman

      Back when I was teaching, I directed a master's thesis on vampire fiction
      for a student--and he was much taken by Hamilton's vampire stories. I had
      read most of the works he wrote on (and directed him to several books), but
      I hadn't (and didn't) read those. He, I think, was excited by their sexual
      emphasis, although he managed to generalize around it. I did read _A Kiss
      of Shadows_ when it first came out, but decided it was selling on the basis
      of sex and so didn't read the others. (I stopped reading most of Ed
      McBain's mysteries when one of his Matthew Hope books began with a
      homosexual orgy that turned out to have very little to do with rest of the
      book. I _did_ read his recent 87th Precinct _Frumious Bandersnatch_ since
      it had a Lewis Carroll-related motif--not that the Rev. Dodgson would have
      approved of what was done with his poem in it.) Sex and violence sell
      (Gershon Legman, as a good Freudian, once said that violence was just
      another form of sex), but they are not the only things of interest in the
      world. (Humor and sentimentality also sell, but I wouldn't want
      sentimentality laid on too heavily either; humor is a more iffy question.)

      --Joe
    • Elizabeth Apgar Triano
      Hi Joe, ... but ... basis ... True, true. And location, location. Compilations of humour do well as bathroom reading, or as something for in the car, or
      Message 2 of 3 , Jul 17, 2004
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        Hi Joe,

        >Back when I was teaching, I directed a master's thesis on vampire fiction
        >for a student--and he was much taken by Hamilton's vampire stories. I had
        >read most of the works he wrote on (and directed him to several books),
        but
        >I hadn't (and didn't) read those. He, I think, was excited by their sexual
        >emphasis, although he managed to generalize around it. I did read _A Kiss
        >of Shadows_ when it first came out, but decided it was selling on the
        basis
        >of sex and so didn't read the others. (I stopped reading most of Ed
        >McBain's mysteries when one of his Matthew Hope books began with a
        >homosexual orgy that turned out to have very little to do with rest of the
        >book. I _did_ read his recent 87th Precinct _Frumious Bandersnatch_ since
        >it had a Lewis Carroll-related motif--not that the Rev. Dodgson would have
        >approved of what was done with his poem in it.) Sex and violence sell
        >(Gershon Legman, as a good Freudian, once said that violence was just
        >another form of sex), but they are not the only things of interest in the
        >world. (Humor and sentimentality also sell, but I wouldn't want
        >sentimentality laid on too heavily either; humor is a more iffy question.)
        >>

        True, true. And location, location. Compilations of humour do well as
        bathroom reading, or as something for in the car, or other fragments of
        time.

        I think Bandersnatch was the name of my dad's HS yearbook. I suspect
        Carroll's work got a lot of fun mileage over the years.

        And, yeah, sex sells. Look at all the bodice-rippers. (And of course, TV
        advertising, MTV, etc., etc.) I recall in seventh grade the girls passed
        around a copy of some gothic romance, with the pages folded for all the
        more involved scenes. I think a little goes a long way, and innuendo can
        be very good. It can be hard to strike the right balance, and different
        readers want different things.

        Daniel Keyes Moran writes some neat sf. In one of his books, _The Last
        Dancer_, I believe, there is a very intense sex scene around the middle
        somewhere. It may be the only sex scene, certainly it is the only scene of
        its kind. It would have, IMO, ruined the book if that had been the flavor
        throughout.

        Anne Rice writes (wrote? maybe she ditched the pen name) as Ann(e?)
        Rampling for some more graphically sexual books, and some of my girlfriends
        talked about them, but I didn't think they were terribly graceful, from the
        bits I read.

        Sex (and innuendo) sells, and I think it can work in some stories. We all
        can think of terrible examples. I guess I consider some of this as light
        entertainment: Mickey Spillane, and kitsch like _Coffee, Tea, or Me?_
        (which I didn't read but I read something else, whose title escapes me,
        because it must have been 25 years ago, and it had a cover blurb about
        CTM), a lot of action-detective stories have sex, but that is the
        gentleman's-entertainment niche, really. I would like to look at the
        currently popular examples of unisex and girl-friendly fantasy. Hmm, is
        that what they call "chick lit"??

        When we get back from camping I will look up LKH's work. Sorry for the
        ramble. Thanks, everyone. We leave Sunday morning, so you'll be rid of my
        fluff for about a week. ;-)

        Lizzie

        Elizabeth Apgar Triano
        lizziewriter@...
        amor vincit omnia
        *** Do visit www.groups.yahoo.com/group/DollsandArts ***
      • Bill
        Hi Lizzie, There s a few more writers doing books similiar to Hamilton s Anita Blake books . One series is called The Dresden Files by Jim Butcher. Another
        Message 3 of 3 , Jul 17, 2004
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          Hi Lizzie,
          There's a few more writers doing books similiar to Hamilton's
          Anita Blake books . One series is called "The Dresden Files"
          by Jim Butcher.
          Another series is written by Simon Green and is set in London.
          And a third is an older series by P. N. Elrod.

          Green is perhaps closest to Hamilton in the sex and violence
          mix, while Butcher's a bit lighter.

          Elrod's are set in an alternative 1930's, I believe. I haven't read
          those,
          but I like the Jim Butcher books as quick "brain candy" reads and
          recommend them to customers looking for books like Hamilton's.

          I also have read Yarbro and have enjoyed the use of the historical
          backgrounds.

          Bill




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