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Long-suffering vampires

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  • Elizabeth Apgar Triano
    I have recently started reading Chelsea Quinn Yarbro s Saint-Germain books. Mostly I like them. Does anyone know why he is often referred to as long
    Message 1 of 11 , Jul 16, 2004
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      I have recently started reading Chelsea Quinn Yarbro's Saint-Germain books.
      Mostly I like them. Does anyone know why he is often referred to as "long
      suffering" in reviews and such?

      Lizzie


      Elizabeth Apgar Triano
      lizziewriter@...
      amor vincit omnia
      *** Do visit www.groups.yahoo.com/group/DollsandArts ***
    • Stolzi
      Lizzie, are you sure it s not the READERS who are long suffering? Diamond Proudbrook (wondering these days if she should have chosen Dandelion instead of
      Message 2 of 11 , Jul 16, 2004
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        Lizzie, are you sure it's not the READERS who are "long suffering?"

        Diamond Proudbrook (wondering these days if she should have chosen "Dandelion" instead of "Diamond")


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Berni Phillips
        From: Elizabeth Apgar Triano ... books. ... Um, because he s very old and has a tragic history? I read some of those in high
        Message 3 of 11 , Jul 16, 2004
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          From: "Elizabeth Apgar Triano" <lizziewriter@...>

          > I have recently started reading Chelsea Quinn Yarbro's Saint-Germain
          books.
          > Mostly I like them. Does anyone know why he is often referred to as "long
          > suffering" in reviews and such?

          Um, because he's very old and has a tragic history? I read some of those in
          high school. I don't think I've picked up one in 20 years so I'm not up on
          more recent ones.

          Berni
        • Elizabeth Apgar Triano
          Message 4 of 11 , Jul 17, 2004
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            << Lizzie, are you sure it's not the READERS who are "long suffering?" >>

            Well, if they are, it is to their own masochistic pleasure. Else why read
            something that causes you to suffer?

            Also thank you, Berni, for the other insight... I suppose that, yes, his
            history is tragic. But I enjoy the romance of the stories. Ah, such love
            letters. Such wonderful dark eyes. Even if he does have small feet. I
            love Friedman's Merentha as well. Guess I like my heroes... something.
            Half-dark and half-tormented, far from almighty, but not creepy horror
            figures either.


            << Diamond Proudbrook (wondering these days if she should have chosen
            "Dandelion" instead of "Diamond") >>

            Dandelions do make better wine. But that's probably not your reason. So,
            why then?

            Lizzie

            Elizabeth Apgar Triano
            lizziewriter@...
            amor vincit omnia
            *** Do visit www.groups.yahoo.com/group/DollsandArts ***
          • Stolzi
            ... From: Elizabeth Apgar Triano
            Message 5 of 11 , Jul 17, 2004
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              ----- Original Message -----
              From: Elizabeth Apgar Triano

              << Lizzie, are you sure it's not the READERS who are "long suffering?" >>

              >Well, if they are, it is to their own masochistic pleasure. Else why read
              >something that causes you to suffer?

              Oh, that was just a joke - as in, "maybe the books are so bad that anybody
              who wd read them must be long suffering."

              You ought to check out SUNSHINE by Robin McKinley, a most unusual story and
              one which presumes that vampires are =not= handsome and tragic. Tragic yes,
              handsome not! They look like you might expect fearsome and half-dead
              creatures to look!

              I'm fond of tormented heroes too, though - have been ever since I fell for
              Mr Rochester as a kid. And many of Mary Stewart's heroes in her Gothics
              were cast in the same mold.

              << Diamond Proudbrook (wondering these days if she should have chosen
              "Dandelion" instead of "Diamond") >>

              >Dandelions do make better wine. But that's probably not your reason. So,
              >why then?

              Gee, diamond wine sounds wonderful - if one could make it. A good theme for
              fantasy! Think of all the precious stones one would have to sacrifice to
              make one, peerless and priceless, drink.

              Why? Well, I chose Diamond as being my birthstone, but later discovered
              there's already a Diamond in the Shire (Diamond of Long Cleeve). I thought
              of Jasmine, because it's my state flower, but Jasmine is already used as a
              rather "cutesy" name in our world. The real state flower is Yellow
              Jessamine, and that's too long for a name. (I used to know a girl named
              Jessamine, too!)

              "Dandelion" was not used by Tolkien, as far as I know. It would go with my
              somewhat cheeky nature, like dandelions (just try and stop them!). Why not
              be a weed instead of a flower? And, my head was once yellow but is now
              feathery and verging on white!

              However, I've used Diamond for some years now, and even have my member's
              button from Oxonmoot last year, in that name. Those who read MYTHPRINT (and
              you all should!) will have seen a photo of it accompanying my Oxonmoot
              report.

              Proudbrook is a translation of my real, married surname wh is German.

              Diamond Proudbrook (Dandelion?)
            • Elizabeth Apgar Triano
              ... I half thought it was a joke, but I wasn t sure. Thanks for your patience. And thanks for a pleasant read on a wacky day packing. I am racking my
              Message 6 of 11 , Jul 17, 2004
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                >"Dandelion" was not used by Tolkien, as far as I know. It would go with my
                >somewhat cheeky nature, like dandelions (just try and stop them!). Why not
                >be a weed instead of a flower? And, my head was once yellow but is now
                >feathery and verging on white!

                I half thought it was a joke, but I wasn't sure. Thanks for your patience.

                And thanks for a pleasant read on a wacky day packing. I am racking my
                brain... there is a name related to I believe another yellow flower, often
                heard in the Spanish version rather than English.. male as well as female
                versions. It won't come to me now, of course. Jasmine... Jonquil....
                argh!!

                Is Mr. Rochester the man from Jane Eyre? I can't recall.

                We change and evolve... sometimes our names can too, other times we are
                stuck with them. Ah, well.

                Lizzie


                Elizabeth Apgar Triano
                lizziewriter@...
                amor vincit omnia
                *** Do visit www.groups.yahoo.com/group/DollsandArts ***
              • David Bratman
                ... Of course not! It s French! - DB
                Message 7 of 11 , Jul 17, 2004
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                  At 11:24 AM 7/17/2004 -0500, Stolzi wrote:
                  >"Dandelion" was not used by Tolkien, as far as I know.

                  Of course not! It's French! <g>

                  - DB
                • Stolzi
                  That s right! So my name could be a tribute to ASLAN as well! ... From: David Bratman ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  Message 8 of 11 , Jul 17, 2004
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                    That's right! So my name could be a tribute to ASLAN as well! <G>
                    ----- Original Message -----
                    From: David Bratman
                    >Of course not! It's French! <g>




                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Stolzi
                    Yes, Rochester is from JANE EYRE. Dandelion Proudbrook, whose memory isn t getting any better either. [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    Message 9 of 11 , Jul 17, 2004
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                      Yes, Rochester is from JANE EYRE.

                      Dandelion Proudbrook, whose memory isn't getting any better either.


                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • juliet@firinn.org
                      ... I can t find my copy of The Silver Chair right now, but I know I remember the Earthmen at the end talking about squeezing juice from gems. Julie
                      Message 10 of 11 , Jul 17, 2004
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                        On Sat, Jul 17, 2004 at 11:24:47AM -0500, Stolzi wrote:
                        > Gee, diamond wine sounds wonderful - if one could make it. A good theme for
                        > fantasy! Think of all the precious stones one would have to sacrifice to
                        > make one, peerless and priceless, drink.

                        I can't find my copy of The Silver Chair right now, but I know I remember
                        the Earthmen at the end talking about squeezing juice from gems.

                        Julie
                      • Berni Phillips
                        From: Stolzi ... I thought it was because Diamonds are a girl s best friend. Seriously, I thought it was what that web site with the
                        Message 11 of 11 , Jul 17, 2004
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                          From: "Stolzi" <Stolzi@...>
                          >
                          > Why? Well, I chose Diamond as being my birthstone, but later discovered
                          > there's already a Diamond in the Shire (Diamond of Long Cleeve).

                          I thought it was because Diamonds are a girl's best friend.

                          Seriously, I thought it was what that web site with the hobbit name
                          generator came up with for you a few years ago. Sorry, I can't think of you
                          as Diamond -- or Dandelion. To me you're Mary. Or Stolzi.

                          Berni
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