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Fwd: [mythsoc] Re: Tolkien's tradition

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  • LeslieJ55@aol.com
    In a message dated 2/25/99 2:34:52 PM Eastern Standard Time, LeslieJ55@aol.com ... in ... feeling ... don ... Freeing
    Message 1 of 1 , Feb 25, 1999
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      In a message dated 2/25/99 2:34:52 PM Eastern Standard Time, LeslieJ55@...
      writes:

      > To: mythsoc@onelist.com
      >
      > From: LeslieJ55@...
      >
      > In a message dated 2/25/99 12:46:03 PM Eastern Standard Time,
      > mwinslow@... writes:
      >
      > > From: Matthew Winslow <mwinslow@...>
      > >
      > > LeslieJ55@... [LeslieJ55@...] wrote:
      > > > Would be great if you could name the book, and tell us why they are
      > not
      > "
      > > in
      > > > the tradition" of Tolkien. "In the tradition of Tolkien" has become a
      > > > catchall phrase for publishers trying to push fantasy books for quite
      > some
      > > > time now. Yet there really isn't a Tradition of Tolkien. Tolkien was
      > > very
      > > > unique in almost all of his work. The use of historical truth blended
      > into
      > >
      > > I've often felt something similar regarding Tolkien: LOTR as much marked
      > the
      > > death of the genre as the beginning, for no one can really expound upon
      > what
      > > Tolkien achieved with LOTR. Instead, we just have a bunch of folks
      > mimicking
      > > him to various degrees. Where fantasy as a genre has succeeded is not
      > with
      > > the
      > > Tolk-clones, but with those works that *don't* try to mimic him, but do
      > pay
      > > homage to his genius and the legacy he gave us. I think the collection
      > (that
      > > was mentioned here on the list recently) "After the King" is good
      > testament
      > > to
      > > this: the stronger works in the book are those that are *not* written
      "in
      >
      > > the
      > > tradition of Tolkien" but that show the same sensitivity to myth that
      > > Tolkien
      > > had (something many of the Clones are missing, btw).
      > >
      > > --
      > > Matthew Winslow mwinslow@... http://x-real.firinn.org/
      > > "Books are my passion, not only writing them and every once in a while
      > > even reading them but just having them and moving them around and
      feeling
      > > the comfort of their serene presence." - Fred Buechner
      > >
      > > Currently reading: Song for the Basilisk by Patricia McKillip
      >
      > Matthew,
      > The beauty of Tolkien's work is that he did not Try to write a Classic Epic
      > story of any type. He wrote a story. Weaving historical scenes into
      > imaginary myth. Telling a morality tale for anyone to understand. You
      don'
      > t
      > set about to write a Classic.
      > A book, piece of music, art, or whathaveyou becomes a Classic because it
      > describes the Human experience. A classic is today, what it was yesterday,
      > what it will be tomorrow. It STANDS. Whether fiction, or non-fiction, no
      > matter what, it stands for humankinds longing for personal liberty, the
      > ability to have a free thought, and the desire to be understood and
      > respected.
      > Fiction writing takes history and colors it with more subtleties and
      > observations so that we can place ourselves in the roles without harming
      > ourselves, and yet gain a better insight into our nature. The need for
      > basic
      > human rights and dignity. Basic moral values. It is in us. We seek it.
      > Tolkien explores these with deep understanding and quite statement.
      Freeing
      > us from our confines of normal earth experience and allowing us to see the
      > vision of what could be, rather than always what is. Thus teaching true
      > moral
      > lessons across the board.
      >
      > for those loving short sweet discussion,what gives?
      >
      > LeslieJ55@...
      > A hobbit returns
      >
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