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RE: [mythsoc] Jackson's Eowyn gets it

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  • Croft, Janet B.
    At Mythcon we will have two papers on Éowyn which take opposite views on her character -- one views her as empowered, one is the more traditional
    Message 1 of 6 , May 3 6:01 AM
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      At Mythcon we will have two papers on Éowyn which take opposite views on her character -- one views her as empowered, one is the more traditional interpretation. Should generate lots of great discussion!

      Janet

      (and Miranda Otto also isn't aware of the Ballad of Tam Lin, in which young the young lady rescues her lover from the Queen of the Elves)



      -----Original Message-----
      From: David Bratman [mailto:dbratman@...]
      Sent: Friday, April 30, 2004 11:41 AM
      To: mythsoc@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [mythsoc] Jackson's Eowyn gets it

      "Eowyn is the only real human heroine in The Lord of the Rings. And,
      although there are very few women in the books, Tolkien did make them
      strong characters. Galadriel and Arwen were in the first film, as Elves,
      but this second film is more dominated by humans, with all their strengths
      and weaknesses. My character has to act as a prop for the king, who is
      confused and losing his power. I can't think of any other myth or legend
      in which the woman actually saves the men. So this very much fits the idea
      of the new woman who makes her own decisions and fights."

      - Miranda Otto, interviewed in "Lady of the Rings" by Garth Pearce, Sunday
      Times, 1 Dec. 2002, Culture sec., p. 4-5.

      I can think of another mythic heroine who saves the men: Luthien, by the
      same author. But the fact that Otto apparently doesn't know that story
      makes her perception about Eowyn even more impressive. How many other male
      fantasy authors, or male fictin writers of any kind, especially pre-1970s,
      empower their female characters as Tolkien does?




      The Mythopoeic Society website http://www.mythsoc.org
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    • Elizabeth Apgar Triano
      I can t help but think that there is literary precedence indeed for the woman guised as a man, off to fight, and sometimes revealed and sometimes not. I can t
      Message 2 of 6 , May 3 6:12 AM
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        I can't help but think that there is literary precedence indeed for the
        woman guised as a man, off to fight, and sometimes revealed and sometimes
        not. I can't think of any examples though, it's just a fairytale sense.

        Lizzie Apgar Triano
        lizziewriter@...
        amor vincit omnia
      • Croft, Janet B.
        Mu Lan? I don t know how much Disney changed the original story, but in the movie she takes her brother s place as a soldier. Janet ... From: Elizabeth Apgar
        Message 3 of 6 , May 3 6:55 AM
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          Mu Lan? I don't know how much Disney changed the original story, but in
          the movie she takes her brother's place as a soldier.

          Janet


          -----Original Message-----
          From: Elizabeth Apgar Triano [mailto:lizziewriter@...]
          Sent: Monday, May 03, 2004 8:12 AM
          To: mythsoc@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: RE: [mythsoc] Jackson's Eowyn gets it

          I can't help but think that there is literary precedence indeed for the
          woman guised as a man, off to fight, and sometimes revealed and
          sometimes
          not. I can't think of any examples though, it's just a fairytale sense.


          Lizzie Apgar Triano
          lizziewriter@...
          amor vincit omnia






          The Mythopoeic Society website http://www.mythsoc.org
          Yahoo! Groups Links
        • SusanPal@aol.com
          In a message dated 5/3/2004 6:13:51 AM Pacific Standard Time, lizziewriter@earthlink.net writes: I can t help but think that there is literary precedence
          Message 4 of 6 , May 3 7:20 AM
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            In a message dated 5/3/2004 6:13:51 AM Pacific Standard Time,
            lizziewriter@... writes:

            "I can't help but think that there is literary precedence indeed for the
            woman guised as a man, off to fight, and sometimes revealed and sometimes
            not. I can't think of any examples though, it's just a fairytale sense."

            There are lots and lots of examples of this in the ballad tradition -- female
            soldiers and sailors. "Bold William Taylor," "There Was a Wealthy Merchant,"
            etc. And hey, what about Joan of Arc? <g>

            Susan


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • lt260
            ... for the ... sometimes ... sense. Harry Turtledove and his Guns of the South series have a female Confederate soldier. She vacillates between fighting
            Message 5 of 6 , May 6 1:16 PM
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              > "I can't help but think that there is literary precedence indeed
              for the
              > woman guised as a man, off to fight, and sometimes revealed and
              sometimes
              > not. I can't think of any examples though, it's just a fairytale
              sense."

              Harry Turtledove and his "Guns of the South" series have a female
              Confederate soldier. She vacillates between fighting in the trenches
              and playing the hooker with the heart of gold. In one chapter she
              suffers dysentery with all the other lads and in another she is the
              romance enabler. This is in line with actual history in which
              females often fought in the wars; sometimes disguised as men and
              other times: not (Molly Pitcher and Margaret Corbin).
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