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Re: [mythsoc] Pt 1 Frodo’s task in Tolkien’s Lord of the Rings

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  • David Bratman
    ... _unlike_ Tolkien? Tolkien was very particularist in his love for his local area, and his country (England, not Britain). ... I m sure that Tolkien s
    Message 1 of 5 , May 1, 2004
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      At 09:52 AM 5/1/2004 -0700, Walt Sheasby wrote:

      >Frodo, on the other hand, unlike Tolkien, is a localist or particularist;

      _unlike_ Tolkien? Tolkien was very particularist in his love for his local
      area, and his country (England, not Britain).


      >18. J.R.R. Tolkien, On Fairy Tales, available in the collections Tree and
      >Leaf and The Tolkien Reader,
      >http://larsen-family.us/~1066/onfairystories.html.

      I'm sure that Tolkien's estate and publishers will be very glad to know
      this illegal copy is online, so that it may be removed.

      - David Bratman
    • Carl F. Hostetter
      ... Whereas _I_ find the scene as Tolkien wrote it to be far _more_ effective and moving, because it shows Frodo s _utter_ isolation, not just from his home --
      Message 2 of 5 , May 1, 2004
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        On May 1, 2004, at 12:52 PM, Walt Sheasby wrote:

        > The original scene is much less heart-rending because Frodo's cry of
        > deprivation is not explicitly related to the beloved country.

        Whereas _I_ find the scene as Tolkien wrote it to be far _more_
        effective and moving, because it shows Frodo's _utter_ isolation, not
        just from his home -- everyone, after all, can become homesick -- but
        from the natural world entirely.


        --
        =============================================
        Carl F. Hostetter Aelfwine@... http://www.elvish.org

        ho bios brachys, he de techne makre.
        Ars longa, vita brevis.
        The lyf so short, the craft so long to lerne.
        "I wish life was not so short," he thought. "Languages take such
        a time, and so do all the things one wants to know about."
      • David Bratman
        Indeed. And what s with the weird Alan Paton reference? Frodo s agony over the Shire has nothing in common with the agony over South Africa depicted in
        Message 3 of 5 , May 1, 2004
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          Indeed.

          And what's with the weird Alan Paton reference? Frodo's agony over the
          Shire has nothing in common with the agony over South Africa depicted in
          Paton's novel "Cry, the Beloved Country."

          - David Bratman


          At 07:35 PM 5/1/2004 -0400, Carl F. Hostetter wrote:
          >
          >On May 1, 2004, at 12:52 PM, Walt Sheasby wrote:
          >
          >> The original scene is much less heart-rending because Frodo's cry of
          >> deprivation is not explicitly related to the beloved country.
          >
          >Whereas _I_ find the scene as Tolkien wrote it to be far _more_
          >effective and moving, because it shows Frodo's _utter_ isolation, not
          >just from his home -- everyone, after all, can become homesick -- but
          >from the natural world entirely.
        • Patrick H. Wynne
          ... and ... Good grief, is THIS what Tolkien scholarship is coming to? Jackson s movie dialogue being cited on the laughable assumption that it has even a
          Message 4 of 5 , May 1, 2004
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            --- In mythsoc@yahoogroups.com, Walt Sheasby
            <wsheasby@y...> wrote:

            > The film script by Peter Jackson emphasizes nostalgia
            > even beyond Tolkien's words. ...

            and

            > The original scene is much less heart-rending because
            > Frodo's cry of deprivation is not explicitly related to the
            > beloved country.

            Good grief, is THIS what Tolkien scholarship is coming to?
            Jackson's movie dialogue being cited on the laughable
            assumption that it has even a _whit_ of value to scholars
            studying JRR Tolkien's thought, and held up as _superior_
            to Tolkien's own writing no less? In an article purporting
            to be about _Tolkien's_ "The Lord of the Rings"?

            God help us if this is the shape of things to come.

            -- Patrick H. Wynne
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