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Beowulf to become a film

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  • Lisa Deutsch Harrigan
    One of the interesting things to happen because LotR is so popular... BEOWULF: Darclight Films has announced the pre-production of BEOWULF, an epic tale based
    Message 1 of 10 , Apr 19, 2004
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      One of the interesting things to happen because LotR is so popular...

      BEOWULF: Darclight Films has announced the pre-production of
      BEOWULF, an epic tale based on the famous Old English poem,
      Beowulf , which inspired Tolkien's Lord Of The Rings. The medieval
      adventure, part fable, part horror-story is loosely based on the 9th
      century Anglo-Saxon poem, Beowulf, telling the blood-soaked tale of
      a Norse hero's battle with a great and murderous troll. BEOWULF is
      written and co-produced by Andrew Rai Berzins and will be directed
      by Sturla Gunnarsson (Such a Long Journey, Rare Birds). The film
      will be shot in the stark and primal landscape of Iceland as a
      production between Canada, the United Kingdom and Iceland. The
      producers include Paul Stephens and Eric Jordan of The Film Works of
      Canada, Michael Lionello Cowan and Jason Piette of the Spice Factory
      in the UK, and Fridrik thor Fridriksson of The Icelandic Film
      Corporation. Scott Speedman from UNDERWORLD and FELICITY has signed
      on to the project. The producers are out to Sean Connery to play
      Hogarth.

      Mythically yours,
      Lisa
    • David Bratman
      ... Hogarth? I think they mean Hrothgar. Hogarth was the 18th-century British artist who created The Rake s Progress . Hogarth. Good grief! If this is how
      Message 2 of 10 , Apr 19, 2004
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        At 12:42 PM 4/19/2004 -0700, a press release wrote:
        >The producers are out to Sean Connery to play Hogarth.

        Hogarth? I think they mean Hrothgar. Hogarth was the 18th-century British
        artist who created "The Rake's Progress".

        Hogarth. Good grief! If this is how they start, this may be even funnier
        than Peter Jackson.
      • Elizabeth Apgar Triano
        Hogarth? I think they mean Hrothgar. Hogarth was the 18th-century British artist who created The Rake s Progress . Hogarth. Good grief! If this is how they
        Message 3 of 10 , Apr 19, 2004
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          Hogarth? I think they mean Hrothgar. Hogarth was the 18th-century British
          artist who created "The Rake's Progress".

          Hogarth. Good grief! If this is how they start, this may be even funnier
          than Peter Jackson. >>

          Oh, darn! Here I was already making excited connections to "Hogarth
          Hughes", the little boy in "Iron Giant." David, you totally popped my
          balloon.

          So is Seamus Heaney going to be involved?

          Lizzie Apgar Triano
          lizziewriter@...
          amor vincit omnia
        • Alisson Veldhuis
          ... David, you thought the Peter Jackson escapade was funny? I thought it was rather sick, myself. Starting out with Hogarth does NOT sound good, either. A. R.
          Message 4 of 10 , Apr 19, 2004
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            >
            >At 12:42 PM 4/19/2004 -0700, a press release wrote:
            > >The producers are out to Sean Connery to play Hogarth.
            >
            >Hogarth? I think they mean Hrothgar. Hogarth was the 18th-century British
            >artist who created "The Rake's Progress".
            >
            >Hogarth. Good grief! If this is how they start, this may be even funnier
            >than Peter Jackson.


            David, you thought the Peter Jackson escapade was funny? I thought it was
            rather sick, myself.

            Starting out with Hogarth does NOT sound good, either.

            A. R. Veldhuis

            _________________________________________________________________
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          • Margaret Dean
            ... Funny ha-ha, or funny woo-woo? Woo-woo. Definitely woo-woo. --Margaret Dean
            Message 5 of 10 , Apr 19, 2004
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              David Bratman wrote:
              >
              > At 09:40 PM 4/19/2004 -0500, Alisson Veldhuis wrote:
              > >
              > >David, you thought the Peter Jackson escapade was funny? I thought it
              > >was rather sick, myself.
              >
              > Funny, adj. 2. Strange; odd; curious.

              "Funny ha-ha, or funny woo-woo?"

              "Woo-woo. Definitely woo-woo."


              --Margaret Dean
              <margdean@...>
            • WendellWag@aol.com
              In a message dated 4/19/2004 3:54:45 PM Eastern Daylight Time, ... My guess was that they spellchecked Hrothgar , and the nearest acceptable word was
              Message 6 of 10 , Apr 19, 2004
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                In a message dated 4/19/2004 3:54:45 PM Eastern Daylight Time,
                dbratman@... writes:

                > Hogarth? I think they mean Hrothgar.

                My guess was that they spellchecked "Hrothgar", and the nearest acceptable
                word was "Hogarth". But when I spellcheck it, the nearest words are "hothead",
                "Protegra", and "shorthair". "Hogarth" isn't in my spellcheck dictionary
                either. When I spellcheck it, I get "hearth", "Hobart", and "hearths". Does
                anyone else get something different?

                Wendell Wagner


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • David Bratman
                ... Funny, adj. 2. Strange; odd; curious.
                Message 7 of 10 , Apr 19, 2004
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                  At 09:40 PM 4/19/2004 -0500, Alisson Veldhuis wrote:
                  >
                  >David, you thought the Peter Jackson escapade was funny? I thought it was
                  >rather sick, myself.

                  Funny, adj. 2. Strange; odd; curious.
                • Alisson Veldhuis
                  ... Oh, I see. Thank you. _________________________________________________________________ Lose those love handles! MSN Fitness shows you two moves to slim
                  Message 8 of 10 , Apr 20, 2004
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                    >
                    >At 09:40 PM 4/19/2004 -0500, Alisson Veldhuis wrote:
                    > >
                    > >David, you thought the Peter Jackson escapade was funny? I thought it was
                    > >rather sick, myself.
                    >
                    >Funny, adj. 2. Strange; odd; curious.
                    >


                    Oh, I see. Thank you.

                    _________________________________________________________________
                    Lose those love handles! MSN Fitness shows you two moves to slim your waist.
                    http://fitness.msn.com/articles/feeds/article.aspx?dept=exercise&article=et_pv_030104_lovehandles
                  • Stolzi@aol.com
                    In a message dated 4/19/2004 10:53:50 PM Central Daylight Time, ... Or as people asked in my family - Funny ha-ha, or funny peculiar? Diamond Proudbrook
                    Message 9 of 10 , Apr 20, 2004
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                      In a message dated 4/19/2004 10:53:50 PM Central Daylight Time,
                      dbratman@... writes:


                      >Funny, adj. 2. Strange; odd; curious.


                      Or as people asked in my family - "Funny ha-ha, or funny peculiar?"

                      Diamond Proudbrook


                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • Lisa Deutsch Harrigan
                      OK OK! The mis-spelling was probably curtesy of the friend who retyped it into her newsletter!! I just did a cut and paste without checking name spellings,
                      Message 10 of 10 , Apr 20, 2004
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                        OK OK!

                        The mis-spelling was probably curtesy of the friend who retyped it into
                        her newsletter!! I just did a cut and paste without checking name
                        spellings, since I can't remember the names of characters after 20 years
                        anyway.

                        I have seen the name Hrothgar spelled correctly in several other places,
                        including this press release which is directly associated with the
                        production company.

                        Scott Speedman to Star in Darclight's Beowulf
                        Source: Inside Film, Dark Horizons
                        Thursday, March 11, 2004

                        Inside Film reports that Darclight Films, the recently launched horror
                        label of Arclight, has announced the pre-production of Beowulf, which
                        will star Scott Speedman (Underworld).

                        The film is the epic tale based on the famous Old English poem,
                        "Beowulf," which inspired Tolkien's Lord Of The Rings. The medieval
                        adventure, part fable, part horror-story is loosely based on the 9th
                        century Anglo-Saxon poem, Beowulf, telling the blood-soaked tale of a
                        Norse hero's battle with a great and murderous troll.

                        The story's spine is simple; out of loyalty to an old friend, a young
                        hero leads a troop of warriors across the sea to help rid a village of a
                        marauding monster. But here the conventions end. The code of the warrior
                        is the law of the land and Beowulf is the greatest warrior of them all.
                        He's brave and powerful, aware of his fame and a little bit full of
                        himself — the medieval equivalent of a rock star - aware, but not
                        entirely happy, that a hero-myth is rising up around his exploits.
                        Beowulf prefers to see himself as an ordinary man, but for his
                        particular skill in slaying monsters.

                        The monster in this case is not a creature of mythic powers, but one of
                        flesh and blood - immense flesh and raging blood, driven by a vengeance
                        from being wronged. Beowulf wants to do the right thing, but what the
                        right thing is, becomes increasingly unclear.

                        Beowulf is written and co-produced by Andrew Rai Berzins and will be
                        directed by Sturla Gunnarsson. The film will be shot in the stark and
                        primal landscape of Iceland as a production between Canada, the United
                        Kingdom and Iceland. The producers are out to Sean Connery to play
                        Hrothgar.


                        Not to sure about the rock star reference, but read into it what you
                        will (you will anyway).

                        Mythically yours,
                        Lisa


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