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Re: [mythsoc] self publishing

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  • David Bratman
    ... Genealogy books, local histories - things with absolutely positively limited markets - are good candidates for self-publishing. Anything else,
    Message 1 of 2 , Mar 12, 2004
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      At 12:50 PM 3/12/2004 -0500, Elizabeth Apgar Triano wrote:

      >Is there really any reason that a person couldn't publish their own book
      >for their own enjoyment? Groups publish cookbooks and geneaology
      >information all the time. Would it truly eradicate any future chance of
      >publication?

      Genealogy books, local histories - things with absolutely positively
      limited markets - are good candidates for self-publishing. Anything else,
      particularly fiction: yes, you are limiting your market by self-publishing.
      (There are people who make good money from cookbooks.) J.K. Rowling had
      trouble selling the first Harry Potter book. Eventually it was bought by a
      publisher who gave it a good editing job, which increased its potential
      tremendously. Had she given up and self-published it, it would have sold
      copies to 75 of her friends, and none of us would ever have heard of it today.


      >The difficulties lie, I think, in sorting the companies which offer good
      >services from the scams and cheesey service joints. I think paying for the
      >full process the first time around isn't necessarily a bad idea. I
      >wouldn't have a clue how to do half this stuff, like ISBN numbers and cover
      >art.

      Unless you want to become a publisher, you shouldn't have to learn about
      those things. If the big publishers don't buy your fiction, try smaller
      ones. If they don't, write something new, or join a writers' group, or try
      short stories, or something. There aren't small specialty markets for
      fiction the way there are for non-fiction on specialized subjects.
      Beginner self-publishing of fiction serves no purpose except to gratify the
      author's ego and sell a few copies to a few of her friends: it won't get it
      out to an audience. Unless there's something really extra-special about
      the work, and if there is, it WILL eventually sell to a real market if you
      only let it.

      - David Bratman
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