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Re: [mythsoc] Definition of "self publishing"

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  • David Bratman
    ... No; if you manufacture a book, you re a printer and/or binder. If you pay for the manufacture, and for the rest of the process from layout to distribution,
    Message 1 of 2 , Mar 11, 2004
      At 11:03 PM 3/10/2004 -0500, Edward Carmien wrote:
      >If you manufacture a book for sale, you're a publisher. (Doesn't matter who
      >the author is.)

      No; if you manufacture a book, you're a printer and/or binder.

      If you pay for the manufacture, and for the rest of the process from layout
      to distribution, and control it whether it's done in your own office or
      not, then you're a publisher.


      >If you sell a book to a publisher who publishes the book, you're not a
      >publisher.

      If, however, you sell it to Xlibris or iUniverse, you're in a
      definitionally amorphous zone where what's really happening, in terms of
      finances and power, is that you're a publisher who's subcontracted out most
      of the work. Legally, they're the publisher, but they don't work the same
      way a real publisher does.


      >If you pay a publisher to publish your book, you're not a publisher.
      >However, you will be said to have "self-published" the book in question.

      Indeed you are not a publisher. In this case, you're a sucker. Again,
      this situation is not to be confused with what Xlibris and iUniverse do.


      >Ownership of rights is a contractual matter that does not enter into the
      >definition of what makes a publisher a publisher.

      Yes. Publishing contracts are typically non-specific term agreements with
      indefinite extendability clauses. Reversion goes to the author; what the
      publisher has are temporary rights which they can keep as long as they
      agree to use them. In other words, if the publisher lets the book out of
      print for a long enough period, the author gets the rights back.

      - David Bratman
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