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Re: New Beowulf, other old things

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  • ERATRIANO@aol.com
    In a message dated 02/29/2000 10:12:51 AM Eastern Standard Time, tedsherman@home.com writes:
    Message 1 of 2 , Feb 29, 2000
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      In a message dated 02/29/2000 10:12:51 AM Eastern Standard Time,
      tedsherman@... writes:

      << a straight translation as well as a copy with Beowulf in OE
      and Heaney's translation on facing pages.
      >>
      Thanks, Ted. You know what I am dyyyyying to find is something in that
      format of the Black Book of Caermarthen. I have one of the 250 facsimiles of
      that book made in 1887, but of course I can't read it! LOL

      So many peoples have lived in the British Isles, am I the only one who can't
      keep their histories straight? The Picts and the Celts and the Anglos and so
      on.... To me, Beowulf always feels more Germanic/Scandinavian than, uh,
      should I say, Celtic/Gaelic? But I'm no scholar, and have forgotten half
      what I ever knew.

      Again what of Egil's Saga... I've read it a few times but not recently....
      the Tain .... other such things.

      Lizzie
    • David S. Bratman
      ... You are quite correct in noting this, and it is indeed confusing. If we were chatting in a long car trip, I could lay out the whole thing for you, but
      Message 2 of 2 , Feb 29, 2000
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        On Tue, 29 Feb 2000 ERATRIANO@... wrote:

        > So many peoples have lived in the British Isles, am I the only one who can't
        > keep their histories straight? The Picts and the Celts and the Anglos and so
        > on.... To me, Beowulf always feels more Germanic/Scandinavian than, uh,
        > should I say, Celtic/Gaelic? But I'm no scholar, and have forgotten half
        > what I ever knew.

        You are quite correct in noting this, and it is indeed confusing. If we
        were chatting in a long car trip, I could lay out the whole thing for
        you, but right now I have to go to work.

        Suffice to say that the English (the people who wrote _Beowulf_) were
        indeed not Celtic, like most of the previous known inhabitants of
        Britain, but Germanic, from the Continent: the area along the coasts of
        the northern Netherlands, northwestern Germany, and west Jutland (the
        mainland part of Denmark), apparently. "England" (and thus "English")
        derives from "Angle-land", the land of the Angles, one of the people who
        made up the amalgam of peoples who invaded Britain around 500 A.D. and
        who are also known as "Anglo-Saxons", Anglo- from Angles again, and
        Saxons being another people in the group, a name still found in Germany,
        part of which is called Saxony (and from which our Saxons probably came
        before they moved to the coast area mentioned above).

        The various Celts (and the Picts) are another matter entirely. No time
        right now, sorry.

        David Bratman
        -not responsible for the following advertisement-
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