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Flammifer

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  • Beregond. Anders Stenström
    Friends, The last line of Bilbo s lay of Earendil in _The Lord of the Rings_ is the Flammifer of Westernesse . As a non-native English reader I would be
    Message 1 of 3 , Feb 11, 2004
      Friends,

      The last line of Bilbo's lay of Earendil in _The Lord of the
      Rings_ is "the Flammifer of Westernesse". As a non-native
      English reader I would be interested to know where natives
      would place the word _Flammifer_ on the scales of a) oddity,
      and b) comprehensibility. (I have my bet on where to place it,
      but I will not tell you beforehand.)

      Chivalrous greetings,

      Beregond
    • Stolzi@aol.com
      In a message dated 2/11/2004 6:55:40 AM Central Standard Time, ... would place ... On a scale of 1 (low) to 10 (high), I rate it a 10 for oddity, as I doubt
      Message 2 of 3 , Feb 11, 2004
        In a message dated 2/11/2004 6:55:40 AM Central Standard Time,
        beregond@... writes:

        >As a non-native English reader I would be interested to know where natives
        would place
        >the word _Flammifer_ on the scales of a) oddity, and b) comprehensibility.


        On a scale of 1 (low) to 10 (high), I rate it a 10 for oddity, as I doubt
        anyone else ever used it, and 5 for comprehensibility, because it depends on
        whether the reader is an educated person who recognizes the Latin roots of the
        word well enough to translate "flame-bearer" - or perhaps has heard of the
        ancient French banner, the Oriflamme (golden flame).

        We have other words of this construction, though, in church usage
        particularly: a thurifer who bears the thurible containing incense, a crucifer who
        carries the processional cross, for example.

        (When I would see acolytes in the Episcopal church carrying candles on tall
        poles, I would mutter "are those the =lucifers="?) (feeble joke there)

        My large Oxford Universal Dictionary has no "flammifer," but "flammigerous,"
        said to be a rare adjective for "bearing flame," and "flammivomous," which of
        course applies to Dragons.

        Diamond Proudbrook


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Beregond. Anders Stenström
        ... Many thanks for your answer. There seem to be no other takers; does that mean everyone agrees? You placed it fairly close to what I thought, but I had
        Message 3 of 3 , Feb 13, 2004
          Stolzi@... wrote:

          > On a scale of 1 (low) to 10 (high), I rate it [=Flammifer] a 10 for oddity, as I
          > doubt
          > anyone else ever used it, and 5 for comprehensibility, because it depends on
          > whether the reader is an educated person

          Many thanks for your answer. There seem to be no other takers;
          does that mean everyone agrees?
          You placed it fairly close to what I thought, but I had expected a
          little higher score in comprehensibility, a 7 or so.

          Chivalrously,

          Beregond
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