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RE: ethnocentricity

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  • Fisher, Matt
    ... But completely consistent with many Native American cultures, where the word used by a group to refer to themselves often translates as real people ,
    Message 1 of 3 , Dec 4, 2003
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      > >Today it's become fashionable to use the term _Anishinaabe_
      > >(literally "normal person"), which can be applied to a number of
      > Algonkian-speaking
      > >peoples of the Great Lakes area.
      >
      >
      > How ethnocentric of them

      But completely consistent with many Native American cultures, where the word used by a group to refer to themselves often translates as "real people", "original people", "normal people", "the people", etc. I can't tell from Alexei's post which word (Ojibwe or Anishinaabe) would be the older term used by that group to refer to themselves, so I can't say if Anishinaabe is a return to an older name or a new development in how they refer to themselves.

      And all of this ties into the relationship between indigenous and Anglo culture....

      Matt
    • alexeik@aol.com
      In a message dated 12/4/3 9:12:39 PM, Matt wrote:
      Message 2 of 3 , Dec 6, 2003
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        In a message dated 12/4/3 9:12:39 PM, Matt wrote:

        <<I can't tell from Alexei's post which word (Ojibwe or Anishinaabe) would be
        the older term used by that group to refer to themselves, so I can't say if
        Anishinaabe is a return to an older name or a new development in how they refer
        to themselves.>>

        The term _Anishinaabe_ "normal person" is used traditionally in Ojibwe in two
        ways: 1) in mythological stories, where it routinely means a mortal as
        opposed to a supernatural being; and 2) in referring to Algonkian peoples who speak
        similar languages and have more or less familiar cultural norms, as opposed to
        other peoples who are felt to be completely alien in culture -- such as
        _bwaanag_ "Sioux" or _gichi-mookomaanag_ "Europeans". In recent years _Anishinaabe_
        has increasingly become the politically correct term for "Ojibwe", although
        in fact Ojibwe is a subset of _Anishinaabe_: technically Ottawas (_Odaawaag_)
        are _Anishinaabeg_, too.
      • David S. Bratman
        ... opposed to ... It is of course normal for groups to have names which mean that they themselves are the people or the real people or the normal
        Message 3 of 3 , Dec 6, 2003
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          At 09:42 AM 12/6/2003 , alexeik@... wrote:

          >The term _Anishinaabe_ "normal person" is used traditionally in Ojibwe in two
          >ways: 1) in mythological stories, where it routinely means a mortal as
          >opposed to a supernatural being; and 2) in referring to Algonkian peoples
          >who speak
          >similar languages and have more or less familiar cultural norms, as
          opposed to
          >other peoples who are felt to be completely alien in culture -- such as
          >_bwaanag_ "Sioux" or _gichi-mookomaanag_ "Europeans".

          It is of course normal for groups to have names which mean that they
          themselves are "the people" or "the real people" or "the normal people",
          and Alexei explains the reason for that practice well. I recently came
          across this point discussed in an article on the ethnography of
          Middle-earth in _Tolkien the Medievalist_ edited by Jane Chance.


          > In recent years _Anishinaabe_
          >has increasingly become the politically correct term for "Ojibwe", although
          >in fact Ojibwe is a subset of _Anishinaabe_: technically Ottawas (_Odaawaag_)
          >are _Anishinaabeg_, too.

          I've seen this sloppiness of nomenclature applied elsewhere in Native
          tribes. The Native culture of the area I live was long called "Coastanoan"
          by outsiders; attempts to replace this non-native term by a native one
          foundered on the fact that these people did not have a single term for the
          entire culture. Eventually the name of one small subgroup, Ohlone, was
          promoted to a general name, and it was used until recently when it seems to
          be falling out of favor again.

          - David Bratman
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