Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: Re: [mythsoc] Heaney's Beowulf or someone's Hiawatha?

Expand Messages
  • alexeik@aol.com
    In a message dated 12/3/3 2:36:07 PM, you wrote:
    Message 1 of 17 , Dec 3, 2003
    • 0 Attachment
      In a message dated 12/3/3 2:36:07 PM, you wrote:

      <<LOL I have to admit that I like "Hiawatha" better than "Wenabozho", but
      would one call it good taste or perhaps good judgement of his primarily
      English-speaking audience?>>

      Certainly "Hiawatha" (especially pronounced the familiar English way: the
      actual Iroquois pronunciation would be 'hee-ya-watt-ha") sounds far less bizarre
      to an English-speaking audience than "Wenabozho". Longfellow's choice is
      perfectly reasonable if one assumes that his audience will never have any further
      interest in the culture that serves as the background for the story. For anyone
      who does know something about it, however, the effect is as jarring as, say,
      arbitrarily giving one of the characters in a Chinese story a Japanese name.
      Alexei
    • alexeik@aol.com
      In a message dated 12/3/3 2:36:07 PM, Lizzie wrote:
      Message 2 of 17 , Dec 3, 2003
      • 0 Attachment
        In a message dated 12/3/3 2:36:07 PM, Lizzie wrote:

        <<I am wondering lately, in my usual muddy way, whether a Yank interest in
        things Native American would be a similar thing to the English interest
        (occasionally) in things Celtic. With all the inaccuracies and
        subjectivities of both hobbies, still it's like a searching out of the
        earlier people.>>

        I've been pointing this out for a long time. The relationship is similar in
        that both involve the cultures of conquered peoples, with most of the terms
        defined by the conquerors -- who choose precisely which aspects of the conquered
        cultures are of interest to them, what their significance is, and how they are
        to be given expression in the dominant culture's art and literature.
        Alexei
      • Stolzi@aol.com
        In a message dated 12/2/2003 10:40:12 PM Central Standard Time, ... In that, Longfellow showed good taste. Well, to YOUR linguistic taste, which is formed by
        Message 3 of 17 , Dec 3, 2003
        • 0 Attachment
          In a message dated 12/2/2003 10:40:12 PM Central Standard Time,
          dbratman@... writes:
          >"Hiawatha" is actually called Wenabozho. Longfellow liked the Iroquois name
          >better, apparently, and arbitrarily substituted it for the original name.

          In that, Longfellow showed good taste.
          Well, to YOUR linguistic taste, which is formed by neither of the languages
          under discussion, or, one might grant, for a poem in English. Perhaps
          "Wenabozho" sounds exquisite in the ears of an Ojibwa, and "Hiawatha" awkward.



          Diamond Proudbrook


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Stolzi@aol.com
          In a message dated 12/3/2003 1:10:05 PM Central Standard Time, ... Algonkian-speaking ... How ethnocentric of them Diamond Proudbrook [Non-text portions of
          Message 4 of 17 , Dec 3, 2003
          • 0 Attachment
            In a message dated 12/3/2003 1:10:05 PM Central Standard Time,
            alexeik@... writes:


            >Today it's become fashionable to use the term _Anishinaabe_
            >(literally "normal person"), which can be applied to a number of
            Algonkian-speaking
            >peoples of the Great Lakes area.


            How ethnocentric of them



            Diamond Proudbrook


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.