Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: [mythsoc] plots and pocket framistans

Expand Messages
  • Stolzi@aol.com
    In a message dated 11/10/2003 9:58:57 AM Central Standard Time, ... It was, actually. I thought nowadays they compare words like implore and exert to
    Message 1 of 32 , Nov 10, 2003
      In a message dated 11/10/2003 9:58:57 AM Central Standard Time,
      dbratman@... writes:


      > I didn't think it was the diction that Stolzi was referring to.

      It was, actually. I thought nowadays they compare words like "implore" and
      "exert" to Approved Vocabulary Lists for the given age, and PETER appears to be
      for the very young ages (in fact my mother said I begged for it, over and
      over, before I could read for myself, which I did at age four or five). Don't
      they?

      My friend's seven-year-old was using "proboscis" the other day, correctly.
      Or does he only turn 7 in January?

      In my re-reading of HP Vol I, I got to the Sorting Hat and paused, irritated
      by something which I believe others have criticized before me: if the basic
      nature and aims of the witch society and of Hogwarts in particular is
      benevolent, WHY does Hogwarts perpetuate a House, namely Slytherin, which has never,
      seemingly, attracted anyone but bad people who cause trouble? [The question of
      benevolence arises again when we get to Witch prisons and Dementors...]

      Diamond Proudbrook


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • John C. Meyers
      Just saw this in today s NYTimes email (free registration required; link isn t free in about a week): Going at the Changes in, Ya Know, English By EMILY EAKIN
      Message 32 of 32 , Nov 15, 2003
        Just saw this in today's NYTimes email (free registration required; link
        isn't free in about a week):

        Going at the Changes in, Ya Know, English
        By EMILY EAKIN
        In his new book, "Doing Our Own Thing," the linguist and
        cultural critic John McWhorter paints an elaborate picture
        of a culture in linguistic upheaval.

        <http://www.nytimes.com/2003/11/15/arts/15JOHN.html>

        Once again, mythies are ahead of the curve!

        John (lurker since the GEnie days)
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.