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Re: [mythsoc] Of Sitcom Plots and Pocket Framistans: The Trouble with Rowling's Plotting

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  • Carl F. Hostetter
    ... Yeah, the Internet is quite frustrating that way, ennit? ;)
    Message 1 of 10 , Nov 9, 2003
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      On Nov 9, 2003, at 11:31 AM, David S. Bratman wrote:

      > But it's not unrealistic. I am very VERY used to people disbelieving
      > or
      > ignoring everything I say, and portraying themselves as idiots as,
      > frequently eschewing actual arguments, they insult and abuse me in
      > absurd
      > terms

      Yeah, the Internet is quite frustrating that way, ennit? ;)
    • alexeik@aol.com
      In a message dated 11/9/3 3:30:40 AM, Wendell Wagner wrote:
      Message 2 of 10 , Nov 10, 2003
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        In a message dated 11/9/3 3:30:40 AM, Wendell Wagner wrote:

        <<There
        doesn't seem to be any bounds to the magic that can be performed in Rowling's
        universe. >>

        You may change your mind about this particular point once you actually finish
        the book. One of the main things Harry learns in this volume is that there
        *are* rigorous bounds to what magic can do.
        Alexei
      • Berni Phillips
        From: Elizabeth Apgar Triano ... Well, in a way. Harry sees Snape as a student and gets an understanding of why Snape is so
        Message 3 of 10 , Nov 10, 2003
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          From: "Elizabeth Apgar Triano" <lizziewriter@...>
          >
          > PLEASE tell me that we find out the scoop about Snape. I will read that
          > book sooner rather than later if I have some sort of carrot reward to look
          > forward to.


          Well, in a way. Harry sees Snape as a student and gets an understanding of
          why Snape is so distrustful of him.

          Berni
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