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Re: [mythsoc] Tolkien in pop lit

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  • Margaret Dean
    David S. Bratman wrote: ... I ve read of people wearing heavy washers around their necks to simulate the =weight= of the Ring.
    Message 1 of 6 , Oct 22, 2003
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      "David S. Bratman" wrote:

      <description of book snipped>

      > Notice there's nothing about the students carrying copies of the One Ring.
      > For all the excesses of Sixties Tolkien mania, that's one thing I never
      > heard of anybody doing.

      I've read of people wearing heavy washers around their necks to
      simulate the =weight= of the Ring. But that definitely
      emphasizes the "burden" part of it.


      --Margaret Dean
      <margdean@...>
    • David S. Bratman
      I m keeping a list of the Inklings appearances (either as themselves or under disguised names) in fiction, and quite some time ago I came across a reference
      Message 2 of 6 , Oct 22, 2003
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        I'm keeping a list of the Inklings' appearances (either as themselves or
        under disguised names) in fiction, and quite some time ago I came across a
        reference to a novel _Everyone's Gone to the Moon_ by the English
        journalist Philip Norman, which was reputedly about a journalist who
        interviews Tolkien.

        Well, I've read the first part of the book. It's set in mid-60s London,
        and is full of references to, and occasional walk-on appearances by,
        cultural figures of the time, but so far as I've gotten Tolkien does not
        appear on stage. (It's due back at the library today, and while it's not
        bad, I'm not planning on finishing it.)

        There are, however, two passing references to Tolkien, and the more
        significant one is on p. 149. Our hero, Louis, is a young journalist who's
        landed a staff job at the trendy magazine supplement to a London Sunday
        newspaper, but he's having trouble getting his pieces published. He
        complains about this to one senior figure who seems sympathetic, and I quote:

        ----

        "Couldn't you find space for it?" [an article they're discussing] he
        pleaded. "I've got so many other pieces waiting around at the moment."

        "What pieces?" Kausman demanded.

        "One on Professor Tolkien ..."

        "You interviewed Tolkien!"

        Louis nodded gloomily, thinking of the manuscript gathering dust somewhere
        in Bracegirdle's office.*

        "My students at Yale this summer were demented about _The Lord of the
        Rings._ They've all renamed their dogs Frodo and Bilbo ... the campus
        coffee house is called Gandalf's Garden ... the new Culture Center, which
        everyone hates, has 'Another Bit of Mordor' chalked on it. But I haven't
        seen a half-way decent profile of him yet."

        ----

        And Louis goes on to say that he's also interviewed Yoko Ono, this at a
        time when she's still just a strange avant-garde artist, not yet hitched up
        with John Lennon. The article they'd started talking about was on
        fashionable clothes designers. I mention this to put Tolkien in the book's
        context, a context Tolkien would have disliked greatly, and one reason it
        was so difficult to interview him.

        Notice there's nothing about the students carrying copies of the One Ring.
        For all the excesses of Sixties Tolkien mania, that's one thing I never
        heard of anybody doing.

        *Bracegirdle is the managing editor, not (despite the name) another Tolkien
        reference.

        - David Bratman
      • Croft, Janet B
        Is this a semi-autobigraphical novel? Phillip Norman, I m assuming the same one, did interview Tolkien in 1967:
        Message 3 of 6 , Oct 22, 2003
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          Is this a semi-autobigraphical novel? Phillip Norman, I'm assuming the same
          one, did interview Tolkien in 1967:

          <http://www.nytimes.com/1967/01/15/books/tolkien-interview.html>
          http://www.nytimes.com/1967/01/15/books/tolkien-interview.html



          Janet Croft

          -----Original Message-----
          From: David S. Bratman [mailto:dbratman@...]
          Sent: Wednesday, October 22, 2003 11:59 AM
          To: mythsoc@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [mythsoc] Tolkien in pop lit


          I'm keeping a list of the Inklings' appearances (either as themselves or
          under disguised names) in fiction, and quite some time ago I came across a
          reference to a novel _Everyone's Gone to the Moon_ by the English
          journalist Philip Norman, which was reputedly about a journalist who
          interviews Tolkien.

          Well, I've read the first part of the book. It's set in mid-60s London,
          and is full of references to, and occasional walk-on appearances by,
          cultural figures of the time, but so far as I've gotten Tolkien does not
          appear on stage. (It's due back at the library today, and while it's not
          bad, I'm not planning on finishing it.)

          There are, however, two passing references to Tolkien, and the more
          significant one is on p. 149. Our hero, Louis, is a young journalist who's
          landed a staff job at the trendy magazine supplement to a London Sunday
          newspaper, but he's having trouble getting his pieces published. He
          complains about this to one senior figure who seems sympathetic, and I
          quote:

          ----

          "Couldn't you find space for it?" [an article they're discussing] he
          pleaded. "I've got so many other pieces waiting around at the moment."

          "What pieces?" Kausman demanded.

          "One on Professor Tolkien ..."

          "You interviewed Tolkien!"

          Louis nodded gloomily, thinking of the manuscript gathering dust somewhere
          in Bracegirdle's office.*

          "My students at Yale this summer were demented about _The Lord of the
          Rings._ They've all renamed their dogs Frodo and Bilbo ... the campus
          coffee house is called Gandalf's Garden ... the new Culture Center, which
          everyone hates, has 'Another Bit of Mordor' chalked on it. But I haven't
          seen a half-way decent profile of him yet."

          ----

          And Louis goes on to say that he's also interviewed Yoko Ono, this at a
          time when she's still just a strange avant-garde artist, not yet hitched up
          with John Lennon. The article they'd started talking about was on
          fashionable clothes designers. I mention this to put Tolkien in the book's
          context, a context Tolkien would have disliked greatly, and one reason it
          was so difficult to interview him.

          Notice there's nothing about the students carrying copies of the One Ring.
          For all the excesses of Sixties Tolkien mania, that's one thing I never
          heard of anybody doing.

          *Bracegirdle is the managing editor, not (despite the name) another Tolkien
          reference.

          - David Bratman



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        • Elizabeth Apgar Triano
          Notice there s nothing about the students carrying copies of the One Ring. ... Poo no virtue there. Probably wasn t on the market. Lizzie Triano
          Message 4 of 6 , Oct 22, 2003
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            Notice there's nothing about the students carrying copies of the One Ring.
            > For all the excesses of Sixties Tolkien mania, that's one thing I never
            > heard of anybody doing. >>

            Poo no virtue there. Probably wasn't on the market.

            Lizzie Triano
            lizziewriter@...
            amor vincit omnia
          • Jane Bigelow
            ... One friend of mine tried to cast a ring with that inscription in metal arts class. The casting failed twice, once when her teacher was watching to see
            Message 5 of 6 , Oct 23, 2003
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              At 09:58 AM 10/22/03 -0700, David wrote:

              >
              > Notice there's nothing about the students carrying copies of the One Ring.
              > For all the excesses of Sixties Tolkien mania, that's one thing I never
              > heard of anybody doing.
              >
              >
              One friend of mine tried to cast a ring with that inscription in metal arts
              class. The casting failed twice, once when her teacher was watching to see
              what the problem was. For the third try, she changed one rune slightly and
              the casting was a success.

              We didn't *really* believe that Tolkein had written his description of the
              ring as nonfiction--quite. We were pretty sure it was just chance.

              Jane
            • David S. Bratman
              ... So he did. It is the same person; I d forgotten about that interview, which was not a first but one of the later of a small cluster of newspaper
              Message 6 of 6 , Oct 23, 2003
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                At 11:08 AM 10/22/2003 , Janet Croft wrote:
                >Is this a semi-autobigraphical novel? Phillip Norman, I'm assuming the same
                >one, did interview Tolkien in 1967

                So he did. It is the same person; I'd forgotten about that interview,
                which was not a first but one of the later of a small cluster of newspaper
                interviews that appeared in 1966-67. If this novel is
                semi-autobiographical, it tells me MUCH more about Mr. Norman than I ever
                wanted to know.

                - David Bratman
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