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LOTR, the Musical

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  • Elizabeth R. Milner
    But will there be Orcettes? -Liz Värttinä to Compose Lord of the Rings Musical 21.10.2003, 20.01 The Finnish folk band Värttinä is taking part in the
    Message 1 of 6 , Oct 22, 2003
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      But will there be Orcettes?

      -Liz

      Värttinä to Compose Lord of the Rings Musical
      21.10.2003, 20.01
      The Finnish folk band Värttinä is taking part in the composition of
      the Lord of the Rings musical to be staged in London.


      The musical will get its premiere in London's West End in spring,
      2005. It has a budget in excess of 11 million euros. Its staging
      coincides with the 50th. anniversary of the publication of J.R.R.
      Tolkien's trilogy.
      Värttinä is being joined in composing the musical by the renowned
      Indian composer A.R. Rahman. He has composed the score for over 50
      Bollywood films and is best known for his musical Bombay Dreams
      currently playing to packed houses in London.

      Värttinä has been delighting folk music audiences for 20 years.

      The producer of the Lord of the Rings musical, Kevin Wallace says
      both Värttinä and Rahman possess an exceptional talent to combine
      modern sounds with the musical tradition of millenia ago.

      YLE TV News (Finland)
    • Berni Phillips
      From: Elizabeth R. Milner ... I think a Bollywood composer is just perfect for this. (I kind of like Indian musical numbers
      Message 2 of 6 , Oct 22, 2003
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        From: "Elizabeth R. Milner" <lizmilner@...>

        > Värttinä to Compose Lord of the Rings Musical
        >21.10.2003, 20.01

        >Värttinä is being joined in composing the musical by the renowned
        >Indian composer A.R. Rahman. He has composed the score for over 50
        >Bollywood films and is best known for his musical Bombay Dreams
        >currently playing to packed houses in London.

        I think a Bollywood composer is just perfect for this. (I kind of like
        Indian musical numbers anyway.)

        Berni
      • Elizabeth Apgar Triano
        Is Bollywood an in term for those musical Indian scores, or is it just a typo for Hollywood? Then there s Dollywood, but that s another matter entirely. I
        Message 3 of 6 , Oct 22, 2003
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          Is Bollywood an in term for those musical Indian scores, or is it just a
          typo for Hollywood? Then there's Dollywood, but that's another matter
          entirely.

          I have Mahabharata on tape from when it was on PBS, but I've never gotten
          through it. It's fun to watch, but time is so darn finite.


          Lizzie Triano
          lizziewriter@...
          amor vincit omnia
        • Berni Phillips
          rom: Elizabeth Apgar Triano ... Bollywood is the term for the Indian film making industry. I don t know how official it is, but
          Message 4 of 6 , Oct 23, 2003
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            rom: "Elizabeth Apgar Triano" <lizziewriter@...>


            > Is Bollywood an in term for those musical Indian scores, or is it just a
            > typo for Hollywood? Then there's Dollywood, but that's another matter
            > entirely.

            Bollywood is the term for the Indian film making industry. I don't know how
            official it is, but I've heard it quite a lot.

            Berni
          • Lisa Deutsch Harrigan
            The Indian Film Industry is concentrated in Mumbai (Was Bombay). Thus it was nicknamed Bollywood (with a B for Bombay) years ago. They make Hundreds of films
            Message 5 of 6 , Oct 23, 2003
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              The Indian Film Industry is concentrated in Mumbai (Was Bombay). Thus it
              was nicknamed Bollywood (with a B for Bombay) years ago. They make
              Hundreds of films every year and actually put Hollywood to shame with
              the volume. Indians go to the movies the way America did in the 30s, in
              other words a lot. Most movies have songs in them (musical isn't
              completely accurate since they will only have 1-3 per movie and they
              aren't always any part of the plot). It's not unusual to see a bunch of
              the songs from the movies strung together for a tv show on our local
              international channel. I watch them for the costuming, some of which is
              traditional, some of which is very modern, some times in the same song!
              Because Indian dancing has always been sensual, Madonna would feel right
              at home. But they are fun to watch!

              Mythically yours,
              Lisa

              Elizabeth Apgar Triano wrote:

              >Is Bollywood an in term for those musical Indian scores, or is it just a
              >typo for Hollywood?
              >
              >
              >
              >
            • Patrick H. Wynne
              ... And don t forget -- your average Bollywood movie is usually three hours long! Mumbai moviegoers expect a lot of bang for their rupee, and filmmakers try to
              Message 6 of 6 , Oct 24, 2003
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                Lisa Deutsch Harrigan wrote:

                > The Indian Film Industry is concentrated in Mumbai (Was Bombay).
                > Thus it was nicknamed Bollywood (with a B for Bombay) years ago.
                > They make hundreds of films every year and actually put
                > Hollywood to shame with the volume. Indians go to the movies
                > the way America did in the 30s, in other words a lot. Most movies
                > have songs in them (musical isn't completely accurate since they
                > will only have 1-3 per movie and they aren't always any part of
                > the plot).

                And don't forget -- your average Bollywood movie is usually three
                hours long! Mumbai moviegoers expect a lot of bang for their
                rupee, and filmmakers try to produce movies that will have a
                little something for everybody (an approach called "masala"):
                romance, action, low comedy, and of course singing and dancing.

                Things get really interesting when this formula is applied to remakes
                of American movies (a common practice). In January I was in San
                Francisco for the MacWorld conference, and got to go to a theater
                (the Naz 8 in Fremont) that shows first-run Bollywood movies.
                I saw KAANTE ('Thorns'), a Bollywood remake of -- believe it or
                not -- RESERVOIR DOGS, complete with bloody bank-heist gone
                wrong, cop-torture, crooks betraying crooks, _and_ lots of song-
                and-dance numbers! It actually worked, since most of the musical
                numbers were presented as performances in a night club operated
                by one of the characters, though there was one point at which the
                crooks themselves sang a humorous song about what they
                were going to do with all their loot.

                I really love Bollywood!

                -- Patrick H. Wynne
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