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Oo, oo, wanta review!

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  • Stolzi@aol.com
    ... Diamond Proudbrook [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    Message 1 of 13 , Oct 17, 2003
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      > a new book, The Lord of the Rings and Philosophy: One book to
      > Rule Them All, ed. Gregory Bassham and Eric Bronson, Chicago: Open Court,
      > 2003.
      >



      Diamond Proudbrook



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • David S. Bratman
      ... I ve seen it. It did not seem to integrate its two subjects very well. It looked like a collection of halfway-decent college freshman papers, though the
      Message 2 of 13 , Oct 17, 2003
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        At 04:05 PM 10/17/2003 , Stolzi@... wrote:
        >
        >> a new book, The Lord of the Rings and Philosophy: One book to
        >> Rule Them All, ed. Gregory Bassham and Eric Bronson, Chicago: Open Court,
        >> 2003.


        I've seen it. It did not seem to integrate its two subjects very well. It
        looked like a collection of halfway-decent college freshman papers, though
        the authors are mostly professors and should do better than that. I
        particularly noted the paper which - as I recall - completely messed up its
        attempt to summarize Tom Shippey's analysis of the nature of evil in the
        Ring. Shippey says - very clearly - that the Ring mediates two concepts of
        evil that are generally considered mutually exclusive. The paper here
        claims that Shippey plumped for only one, and the author of the paper then
        proceeds to argue in favor of the other as the sole explanation, thus
        making Shippey out to be an idiot.

        This book is one of a series of scholarly anthologies on pop culture and
        philosophy, of which I've seen the one on "Buffy the Vampire Slayer," which
        was almost as anemic. I haven't seen the one on "The Matrix," but it might
        be interesting to read what they can make out of that, as the sequel to
        that film by all reports lacks the original's philosophical depth,
        suggesting that the depth was solely in the subject matter (long ago fully
        explored by the likes of Philip K. Dick) and not at all in the minds of the
        screenwriters.

        David Bratman
      • darancgrissom@sbcglobal.net
        ... From: Stolzi@aol.com [mailto:Stolzi@aol.com] Sent: Friday, October 17, 2003 4:06 PM To: mythsoc@yahoogroups.com Subject: [mythsoc] Oo, oo, wanta review!
        Message 3 of 13 , Oct 18, 2003
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          -----Original Message-----
          From: Stolzi@... [mailto:Stolzi@...]
          Sent: Friday, October 17, 2003 4:06 PM
          To: mythsoc@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [mythsoc] Oo, oo, wanta review!



          > a new book, The Lord of the Rings and Philosophy: One book to
          > Rule Them All, ed. Gregory Bassham and Eric Bronson, Chicago: Open
          Court,
          > 2003.
          >



          [darancgrissom@...]

          Just so everyones is clear the other books in this series include "The
          Matrix and Philosophy: Welcome to the Real World," "The Simpsons and
          Philosophy: The D'oh of Homer," and coming soon, "The Sopranos and
          Philosophy." I have read both the Simpsons and Matrix editions and found
          them so devoid of any spark of original insight into their subjects that I
          didn't even bother picking the Lord of the Rings one off the shelf when I
          saw it at Barnes and Nobles. It is pop culture philosophy, which I'm not
          putting down mind you, it's something of a specialty of mine, but these
          books are bad pop culture philosophy.


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • WendellWag@aol.com
          In a message dated 10/18/2003 5:16:25 AM Eastern Daylight Time, ... In the series so far (quoting from the Open Court catalog I got recently): _Seinfeld and
          Message 4 of 13 , Oct 18, 2003
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            In a message dated 10/18/2003 5:16:25 AM Eastern Daylight Time,
            darancgrissom@... writes:

            > Just so everyones is clear the other books in this series include "The
            > Matrix and Philosophy: Welcome to the Real World," "The Simpsons and
            > Philosophy: The D'oh of Homer," and coming soon, "The Sopranos and
            > Philosophy."

            In the series so far (quoting from the Open Court catalog I got recently):

            _Seinfeld and Philosophy: A Book about Everything and Nothing_
            _The Simpsons and Philosophy: The D'oh of Homer_
            _The Matrix and Philosophy: Welcome to the Desert of the Real_
            _Buffy the Vampire Player and Philosophy: Fear and Trembling in Sunnyvale_
            _The Lord of the Rings and Philosophy: One Book to Rule Them All_

            Coming soon:

            _Baseball and Philosphy_

            And in preparation:

            _The Sopranos and Philosophy_
            _Woody Allen and Philosophy_
            _Harry Potter and Philosophy_

            Presumably the books not out yet will also be given cute subtitles.

            Wendell Wagner


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Kevin Bowring
            Lovely, more books to add to the list of those I will never have time to read. Kevin
            Message 5 of 13 , Oct 18, 2003
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              Lovely, more books to add to the list of those I will never have time to read.

              Kevin

              WendellWag@... wrote:

              > In a message dated 10/18/2003 5:16:25 AM Eastern Daylight Time,
              > darancgrissom@... writes:
              >
              > > Just so everyones is clear the other books in this series include "The
              > > Matrix and Philosophy: Welcome to the Real World," "The Simpsons and
              > > Philosophy: The D'oh of Homer," and coming soon, "The Sopranos and
              > > Philosophy."
              >
              > In the series so far (quoting from the Open Court catalog I got recently):
              >
              > _Seinfeld and Philosophy: A Book about Everything and Nothing_
              > _The Simpsons and Philosophy: The D'oh of Homer_
              > _The Matrix and Philosophy: Welcome to the Desert of the Real_
              > _Buffy the Vampire Player and Philosophy: Fear and Trembling in Sunnyvale_
              > _The Lord of the Rings and Philosophy: One Book to Rule Them All_
              >
              > Coming soon:
              >
              > _Baseball and Philosphy_
              >
              > And in preparation:
              >
              > _The Sopranos and Philosophy_
              > _Woody Allen and Philosophy_
              > _Harry Potter and Philosophy_
              >
              > Presumably the books not out yet will also be given cute subtitles.
              >
              > Wendell Wagner
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
              >
              > The Mythopoeic Society website http://www.mythsoc.org
              >
              > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
            • Berni Phillips
              From: ... On the other hand, the book on Buffy the Vampire Slayer was the best of the books of essay collections about Buffy that
              Message 6 of 13 , Oct 18, 2003
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                From: <darancgrissom@...>

                > Just so everyones is clear the other books in this series include "The
                > Matrix and Philosophy: Welcome to the Real World," "The Simpsons and
                > Philosophy: The D'oh of Homer," and coming soon, "The Sopranos and
                > Philosophy." I have read both the Simpsons and Matrix editions and found
                > them so devoid of any spark of original insight into their subjects that I
                > didn't even bother picking the Lord of the Rings one off the shelf when I
                > saw it at Barnes and Nobles. It is pop culture philosophy, which I'm not
                > putting down mind you, it's something of a specialty of mine, but these
                > books are bad pop culture philosophy.

                On the other hand, the book on Buffy the Vampire Slayer was the best of the
                books of essay collections about Buffy that I've seen. (I've read 3 or 4 of
                them.)

                Most likely there's not that much continuation of writers from one book in
                the series to the next so the series as a whole would be uneven. I
                recommend the Bratman method: stand in the bookstore and read big chunks of
                the book if you're not sure if you want to buy it or not. (And Barnes &
                Nobles makes it so easy with their comfy chairs!)

                Berni
              • darancgrissom@sbcglobal.net
                ... From: Berni Phillips [mailto:bernip@ix.netcom.com] Sent: Saturday, October 18, 2003 3:40 PM To: mythsoc@yahoogroups.com Subject: Re: [mythsoc] Oo, oo,
                Message 7 of 13 , Oct 19, 2003
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                  -----Original Message-----
                  From: Berni Phillips [mailto:bernip@...]
                  Sent: Saturday, October 18, 2003 3:40 PM
                  To: mythsoc@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: Re: [mythsoc] Oo, oo, wanta review!



                  From: <darancgrissom@...>

                  > Just so everyones is clear the other books in this series include "The
                  > Matrix and Philosophy: Welcome to the Real World," "The Simpsons and
                  > Philosophy: The D'oh of Homer," and coming soon, "The Sopranos and
                  > Philosophy." I have read both the Simpsons and Matrix editions and
                  found
                  > them so devoid of any spark of original insight into their subjects that
                  I
                  > didn't even bother picking the Lord of the Rings one off the shelf when
                  I
                  > saw it at Barnes and Nobles. It is pop culture philosophy, which I'm
                  not
                  > putting down mind you, it's something of a specialty of mine, but these
                  > books are bad pop culture philosophy.

                  On the other hand, the book on Buffy the Vampire Slayer was the best of
                  the
                  books of essay collections about Buffy that I've seen. (I've read 3 or 4
                  of
                  them.)

                  Most likely there's not that much continuation of writers from one book in
                  the series to the next so the series as a whole would be uneven. I
                  recommend the Bratman method: stand in the bookstore and read big chunks
                  of
                  the book if you're not sure if you want to buy it or not. (And Barnes &
                  Nobles makes it so easy with their comfy chairs!)

                  Berni

                  [darancgrissom@...]
                  I have not seen the Buffy one, and I would like to read it, though I have
                  reservation after the Matrix and Simpsons books. Analysis of Buffy the
                  Vampire Slayer would benefit from a book like this. It would have nice to
                  know about it when I wrote an end of semester paper on the show and its
                  impact on the self image of pre-teen girls. However, when dealing with a
                  subject like Lord of the Rings, where there is a great volume of critical
                  work on the subject seems like just cashinfg in on a craze. Though that is
                  sort of the point of the series.
                  P.S. the chairs in my Barnes & Nobles badly need a dry-cleaning. Yuck.


                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Stolzi@aol.com
                  ... I am a very fast reader and always have ethical problems with this. Does one salve one s conscience sufficiently by making sure to purchase =something=
                  Message 8 of 13 , Oct 19, 2003
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                    Berni wrote:

                    > I
                    > recommend the Bratman method: stand in the bookstore and read big chunks
                    > of
                    > the book if you're not sure if you want to buy it or not. (And Barnes &
                    > Nobles makes it so easy with their comfy chairs!)
                    >

                    I am a very fast reader and always have ethical problems with this. Does one
                    salve one's conscience sufficiently by making sure to purchase =something=
                    every few months or so?

                    What think ye all?

                    Diamond Proudbrook


                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • juliet@firinn.org
                    ... You can always consider whether you d be able to get the book from a library or borrow it from a friend. If I knew I could probably read the same book at
                    Message 9 of 13 , Oct 19, 2003
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                      On Sun, Oct 19, 2003 at 03:44:08PM -0400, Stolzi@... wrote:
                      > Berni wrote:
                      >
                      > > I
                      > > recommend the Bratman method: stand in the bookstore and read big chunks
                      > > of
                      > > the book if you're not sure if you want to buy it or not. (And Barnes &
                      > > Nobles makes it so easy with their comfy chairs!)
                      > >
                      >
                      > I am a very fast reader and always have ethical problems with this. Does one
                      > salve one's conscience sufficiently by making sure to purchase =something=
                      > every few months or so?
                      >
                      > What think ye all?

                      You can always consider whether you'd be able to get the book from a library
                      or borrow it from a friend. If I knew I could probably read the same book
                      at a library, I'd have no problem reading it in the store instead.

                      Julie
                    • Jack
                      ... Np problem at all. I buy nough books that I have no problem at all about reading a big chunk (usually fifty or so pages) before deciding if I m going to
                      Message 10 of 13 , Oct 19, 2003
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                        >I am a very fast reader and always have ethical problems with this. Does one
                        >salve one's conscience sufficiently by making sure to purchase =something=
                        >every few months or so?

                        Np problem at all. I buy 'nough books that I have no problem at all about
                        reading a big chunk (usually fifty or
                        so pages) before deciding if I'm going to buy a book.

                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • Jay Hershberger
                        ... chunks ... one ... JH: Our local Barnes and Noble encourages reading in the store. They think it promotes reading in general, which in the end is good for
                        Message 11 of 13 , Oct 19, 2003
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                          Berni wrote:

                          > I
                          > recommend the Bratman method: stand in the bookstore and read big
                          chunks
                          > of
                          > the book if you're not sure if you want to buy it or not. (And Barnes &
                          > Nobles makes it so easy with their comfy chairs!)
                          >

                          >I am a very fast reader and always have ethical problems with this. Does
                          one
                          >salve one's conscience sufficiently by making sure to purchase =something=
                          >every few months or so?

                          >What think ye all?

                          >Diamond Proudbrook

                          JH: Our local Barnes and Noble encourages reading in the store. They think
                          it promotes reading in general, which in the end is good for their business.

                          Jay Hershberger
                        • Elizabeth Apgar Triano
                          JH: Our local Barnes and Noble encourages reading in the store. They think it promotes reading in general, which in the end is good for their business. Yes
                          Message 12 of 13 , Oct 20, 2003
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                            JH: Our local Barnes and Noble encourages reading in the store. They think
                            it promotes reading in general, which in the end is good for their
                            business. >>

                            Yes exactly. Isn't there a Tom Lehrer song, The Old Dope Peddler that
                            includes the lyrics, "He gives the kids free samples because he knows full
                            well that today's young innocent faces will be tomorrow's clientele."

                            We might skim and put some of them back, but the longer we remain in the
                            store, the more things will go home with us in the end.

                            Often I have a list of books I am looking for, and maybe half I will end up
                            not buying once I've seen them, but others I will buy. Can't do that as
                            easily online. Can do it some now, but it's still not the same.

                            Lizzie Triano
                            lizziewriter@...
                            amor vincit omnia
                          • dianejoy@earthlink.net
                            I figure reading s part of the purchase / no sale decision making process, even if it s a good chunk. I can usually tell if I want a book fairly fast, and if
                            Message 13 of 13 , Oct 20, 2003
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                              I figure reading's part of the purchase / no sale decision making process,
                              even if it's a good chunk. I can usually tell if I want a book fairly
                              fast, and if I do (and it's expensive) I put it down *really fast* (fearing
                              I may plunk down the $30.) Then I truck over to the library. Sometimes I
                              eventually buy the library books I read, but I think I buy enough from my
                              favorite JoBeth bookstore that I can comfortably read a good chunk.
                              However, I don't usually read for extended periods. I'm too busy browsing
                              and finding new titles to add to the list! ---djb

                              Original Message:
                              -----------------
                              From: Jack jack@...
                              Date: Sun, 19 Oct 2003 16:26:36 -0400
                              To: mythsoc@yahoogroups.com
                              Subject: Re: [mythsoc] Oo, oo, wanta review!



                              >I am a very fast reader and always have ethical problems with this. Does
                              one
                              >salve one's conscience sufficiently by making sure to purchase =something=
                              >every few months or so?

                              Np problem at all. I buy 'nough books that I have no problem at all about
                              reading a big chunk (usually fifty or
                              so pages) before deciding if I'm going to buy a book.

                              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



                              The Mythopoeic Society website http://www.mythsoc.org

                              Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/



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