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Re: what do dragons speak...

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  • Paul F. Labaki
    I must agree, Lizzie. I would be astonished to learn that someone writing with the intention of winning some sort of literary prize actually won. While we
    Message 1 of 8 , Jan 1, 2000
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      I must agree, Lizzie. I would be astonished to learn that someone writing
      with the intention of winning some sort of literary prize actually won.
      While we write for an audience, the initial audience is almost always
      composed of one, the author.

      Would you give some examples of nasty stuff that wins awards? I have often
      thouroughly enjoyed some Hugo and Nebula Award winning titles Heinlein's
      "Stranger in a Strange Land" and Willis' "Doomsday Book" come quickly to
      mind, as well as several of those efforts receiving the Mythopoeic Fantasy
      Award, although I disagree as often as I approve of the winner.

      Paul Labaki

      ----------
      >From: ERATRIANO@...
      >To: mythsoc@onelist.com
      >Subject: Re: [mythsoc] what do dragons speak...
      >Date: Tue, Dec 28, 1999, 7:51 AM
      >

      > From: ERATRIANO@...
      >
      > In a message dated 12/27/1999 11:12:42 PM Eastern Standard Time,
      > bigelow@... writes:
      >
      > << Personally, I don't think there's any disgrace in turning
      > out solid, enjoyable and honest work even if you never do win medals,
      > awards, or glowing mentions in lit'rary journals. I certainly hope so! >>
      > Hear hear! After all, a lot of the stuff that gets awards and such is nasty
      > to read, IMNSHO
      >
      > Lizzie
      >
      > > The Mythopoeic Society website http://www.mythsoc.org
    • Paul F. Labaki
      Thanks for the encouragement, Jane. I guess I can cope with an increased dose of madness in my life. I m curious about your equating work with drudgery. I
      Message 2 of 8 , Jan 1, 2000
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        Thanks for the encouragement, Jane.

        I guess I can cope with an increased dose of madness in my life. I'm
        curious about your equating work with drudgery. I don't see them as
        synonymous. When I said that I resolve to work at my writing this year, I
        mean that I will engage in the experience more often, even with a schedule,
        and be disciplined in not allowing fatigue or distractions to divert me. I
        want to engage in some exercises not of my own devising in addition to
        trying things my own way. I know that approaching my own ideas from angles
        that I've not thought of myself can expose them in ways I've not explored.
        I think it is integral to the creative process for the maker to be open and
        to avoid being trapped by his own regimine or process. It is dangerous or
        damaging to the creative process for the maker to get too comfortable.

        Also, let's face it; writing is hard work requiring exhaustive labor like
        many other enjoyable recreations, skiing, gardening, etc. I have to fight a
        strong tendancy toward laziness. After all, isn't reading so much less
        labor, and a valid, even, for a writer, a necessary diversion?

        Paul Labaki

        >

        > From: Robert and Jane Bigelow <bigelow@...>
        >
        > Paul,
        >
        > You've said it yourself--"to work at my writing this year". If it gets to
        > be just drudgery, then for pity's sake find something else to do with your
        > time and energies; if you still love writing/your story/the idea you're
        > working on, even when it's driving you mad, then keep at it.
        > Jane Bigelow
        >
        >
      • ERATRIANO@xxx.xxx
        In a message dated 01/01/2000 11:02:08 AM Eastern Standard Time, sheik@buffnet.net writes:
        Message 3 of 8 , Jan 1, 2000
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          In a message dated 01/01/2000 11:02:08 AM Eastern Standard Time,
          sheik@... writes:

          << Would you give some examples of nasty stuff that wins awards? >>
          nope, can't do. Not the big awards, they get good stuff. I am thinking,
          smaller "artsy" awards that go to things most of us have trouble reading.
          Things which wouldn't survive a grammar analysis. Such as my sentences.
          LOL. I think my mind is doing the ossifying thing, as I am getting more
          opinionated than I ever used to be. (Memory was never good, so being unable
          to remember things I didn't like in the first place is no surprise.)

          Lizzie
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