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Re: RE: [mythsoc] Re: Pullman

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  • alexeik@aol.com
    In a message dated 10/8/3 11:32:45 AM, Lizzie wrote:
    Message 1 of 42 , Oct 8, 2003
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      In a message dated 10/8/3 11:32:45 AM, Lizzie wrote:

      <<but I have
      actually spoken to people in bookstores who seemed otherwise well read and
      stuff, one was a librarian in fact, who enjoyed Pullman because he gave his
      characters more of a semblance of independence. Something like that>>

      My problem with it was that there was *no* semblance of independence in the
      characters -- that they seemed to be manipulated like puppets on strings by the
      author in order to make his ideological points, without any regard for
      consistency of character. For example, Lyra (one of the two main characters) is
      indeed, at first, presented as independent-minded, so much so that even by the end
      of the second volume one expects her to be able to avoid the no-win either-or
      choice she (and the reader) is presented with: either the cruelty of the
      Church or the cruelty of Lord Asriel (Lyra's father, and the story's Stan-figure).
      However, Pullman suddenly makes her entirely passive, unable or unwilling to
      influence events, siding with her father by default rather than through
      conviction. The reader hasn't been led to anticipate such behaviour from her, and
      the effect is terribly jarring.
      My reaction to the trilogy was the same as Mary's: bowled over by the
      first book, made uneasy by the second one, and horribly disappointed by the third.
      The fact that it was the third book that was singled out for a high literary
      award implies that the judges were moved by its ideological content more than
      by its literary merits, since by any objective literary standards it's a
      frightful mess.
      Alexei
    • Larry Swain
      ... A minor correction here: there are 2 points when God says very good in Genesis 1, after the third day and after the sixth. In Genesis 2 when we speak of
      Message 42 of 42 , Dec 16, 2007
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        >
        >
        > Yes, particularly sex - after all, that's the only point when God
        > saw that it was "very good" - after woman was created to be a
        > suitable partner for man. {grin}

        A minor correction here: there are 2 points when God says "very good" in Genesis 1, after the third day and after the sixth. In Genesis 2 when we speak of the specific creation of woman as a partner suitable for the man, there is no such declaration.

        That doesn't affect your point, just a "point of information".

        Larry Swain

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