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Re: [mythsoc] RotK Trailer

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  • David S. Bratman
    ... Touche. But I still think the application of the metaphor is typical of Jackson s thinking, not Tolkien s. Notice how Tolkien, almost uniquely among
    Message 1 of 9 , Oct 1, 2003
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      At 07:19 AM 10/1/2003 , Susan wrote:

      >Doesn't Gandalf say, at some point in the written RotK, "The board is set,
      >and the pieces are moving"? I can't find it at the moment, but I have a
      >distinct memory of that; and if so, the chess metaphor is Tolkien's, not
      >Jackson's.

      Touche. But I still think the application of the metaphor is typical of
      Jackson's thinking, not Tolkien's. Notice how Tolkien, almost uniquely
      among fantasy authors, is able to write giant strategy sessions (the
      Council of Elrond and the Last Debate) that don't read like giant strategy
      sessions.

      - David Bratman
    • David S. Bratman
      ... Have you played much chess? A talent of chess masters is to do things which the opponent can physically see but does not realize the significance of.
      Message 2 of 9 , Oct 1, 2003
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        At 07:32 AM 10/1/2003 , Janet wrote:

        >One older article I ran across in my research speculated that Sauron
        >wouldn't have been that good at chess. He didn't seem to understand feints
        >and sacrifices, and clearly couldn't see ahead to Gandalf's next moves.
        >Then there's the gaming metaphor that was used in the original Star Trek
        >somewhere -- Spock plays chess and Kirk plays poker. Spock's moves and
        >forces are all out in the open; he has no secrets from his opponent except
        >what's in his head. Kirk's hand is hidden -- you can't know for sure what
        >resources he has or what he plans to do with them. So Gandalf is actually
        >playing poker, not chess....

        Have you played much chess? A talent of chess masters is to do things
        which the opponent can physically see but does not realize the significance
        of. Sauron knows perfectly well that spies are being sent into Mordor. He
        even captures one, and has his Lieutenant use his belongings to taunt the
        invaders at the Black Gate. What he doesn't know is the significance of
        what is happening. Frodo putting on the Ring at Mount Doom is as much the
        equivalent of Gandalf suddenly and unexpectedly making a check or even a
        checkmate as it is of Gandalf laying down the winning poker hand.

        - David Bratman
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