Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [mythsoc] The Forest of Forever

Expand Messages
  • Elizabeth Apgar Triano
    Well, um, actually, I did just glance at my own bookshelves. It s another of those books I bought years ago (heck, decades ago) and have never gotten around to
    Message 1 of 14 , Sep 29, 2003
    • 0 Attachment
      Well, um, actually, I did just glance at my own bookshelves. It's another
      of
      those books I bought years ago (heck, decades ago) and have never gotten
      around to reading. Having glanced at the title every time I moved or
      resuffled my
      books, I remembered the name. But, yes, I would have done a websearch if I
      hadn't happened to have owned the book. >>

      Oh Wendell! :-))) And I thought you totally abhorred "silly". It's a
      quick read... what else do you have in that genre? What else exists?

      Lizzie Triano
      lizziewriter@...
      amor vincit omnia
    • WendellWag@aol.com
      In a message dated 9/29/2003 7:07:34 AM Eastern Daylight Time, ... I m trying to guess why you think I don t like silliness. I like silliness in a novel. I m
      Message 2 of 14 , Sep 29, 2003
      • 0 Attachment
        In a message dated 9/29/2003 7:07:34 AM Eastern Daylight Time,
        lizziewriter@... writes:

        > And I thought you totally abhorred "silly".

        I'm trying to guess why you think I don't like silliness. I like silliness
        in a novel. I'm sometimes bothered by silliness in a E-mail message or a
        mailing list post if the cutesiness of the message makes it hard to read. I really
        dislike it when someone tries to pass off as silliness in a message or a post
        something that is actually snide flippency, the point of which is to make fun
        of someone and then to blame them for not getting the joke if they complain.
        If I don't do silliness in my posts, that's mostly because I can't do it
        naturally. I can sometimes do elaborate absurd humor in a post, but I have to be
        careful about it, because half the time people don't understand that I'm
        joking and get mad about what they think is an offensive remark.

        But are Thomas Burnett Swann's novels silly? I've never read any of them,
        but that's not how I've heard them described. I'd list all of his novels, but
        I've got to leave for work immediately and don't have time to look them up.

        Wendell Wagner


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • alexeik@aol.com
        In a message dated 9/29/3 3:35:25 PM, Wendell wrote:
        Message 3 of 14 , Sep 29, 2003
        • 0 Attachment
          In a message dated 9/29/3 3:35:25 PM, Wendell wrote:

          <<But are Thomas Burnett Swann's novels silly? I've never read any of them,
          but that's not how I've heard them described.>>

          I think it would depend a great deal on the individual reader's tastes. Many
          of Swann's stories (especially the earlier ones) can come across as a bit
          saccharine. The ones I thought were most successful were _How Are the Mighty
          Fallen_ (a fantasy version of the David and Jonathan story) and _Wolfwinter_.
          Alexei
        • Elizabeth Apgar Triano
          But are Thomas Burnett Swann s novels silly? I ve never read any of them, but that s not how I ve heard them described. I d list all of his novels, but I ve
          Message 4 of 14 , Sep 30, 2003
          • 0 Attachment
            But are Thomas Burnett Swann's novels silly? I've never read any of them,
            but that's not how I've heard them described. I'd list all of his novels,
            but
            I've got to leave for work immediately and don't have time to look them up.
            >>

            So how HAVE you heard them described ?? Now I must know.

            I am dying to look him up on abebooks or some such, but then I'd probably
            order some, and I really can't do that right now. I will check in the used
            book shops in person when I go in a week or so, then I will be having an
            excuse to shop.

            Lizzie Triano
            lizziewriter@...
            amor vincit omnia
          • WendellWag@aol.com
            In a message dated 9/30/2003 11:35:06 AM Eastern Daylight Time, ... Some of the things I ve read said that the novels were about how the old gods were
            Message 5 of 14 , Oct 1, 2003
            • 0 Attachment
              In a message dated 9/30/2003 11:35:06 AM Eastern Daylight Time,
              lizziewriter@... writes:

              > So how HAVE you heard them described ?? Now I must know.
              >

              Some of the things I've read said that the novels were about how the "old
              gods" were better. In other words, they were saying that the Greek and Roman
              gods were better than anything we have today.

              Wendell


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Elizabeth Apgar Triano
              Some of the things I ve read said that the novels were about how the old gods were better. In other words, they were saying that the Greek and Roman gods
              Message 6 of 14 , Oct 1, 2003
              • 0 Attachment
                Some of the things I've read said that the novels were about how the "old
                gods" were better. In other words, they were saying that the Greek and
                Roman
                gods were better than anything we have today. >>

                Considering how ticked I am at organized religion at the moment, I'd be
                vulnerable to that line of argument -- except that it would have to be
                another set of gods. I am thinking a basic nature spirituality might work
                nicely.

                But seriously, maybe some of his other books were more mainstream novel
                types. I can't imagine _Forest of Forever_ carrying any such argument.
                But maybe, as a teen, I missed that level of meaning.

                Lizzie Triano
                lizziewriter@...
                amor vincit omnia
              • dianejoy@earthlink.net
                I m getting more curious about this book; the title s intriguing, and it s going to be interesting to find out how silly it is. Oh, well, I m going to the
                Message 7 of 14 , Oct 1, 2003
                • 0 Attachment
                  I'm getting more curious about this book; the title's intriguing, and it's
                  going to be interesting to find out how "silly" it is. Oh, well, I'm going
                  to the library anyway . . . . ---djb

                  Original Message:
                  -----------------
                  From: Elizabeth Apgar Triano lizziewriter@...
                  Date: Wed, 1 Oct 2003 08:26:37 -0400
                  To: mythsoc@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: Re: [mythsoc] The Forest of Forever


                  Some of the things I've read said that the novels were about how the "old
                  gods" were better. In other words, they were saying that the Greek and
                  Roman
                  gods were better than anything we have today. >>

                  Considering how ticked I am at organized religion at the moment, I'd be
                  vulnerable to that line of argument -- except that it would have to be
                  another set of gods. I am thinking a basic nature spirituality might work
                  nicely.

                  But seriously, maybe some of his other books were more mainstream novel
                  types. I can't imagine _Forest of Forever_ carrying any such argument.
                  But maybe, as a teen, I missed that level of meaning.

                  Lizzie Triano
                  lizziewriter@...
                  amor vincit omnia





                  The Mythopoeic Society website http://www.mythsoc.org

                  Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/



                  --------------------------------------------------------------------
                  mail2web - Check your email from the web at
                  http://mail2web.com/ .
                • alexeik@aol.com
                  In a message dated 10/1/3 12:27:11 PM, Lizzie Triano wrote:
                  Message 8 of 14 , Oct 1, 2003
                  • 0 Attachment
                    In a message dated 10/1/3 12:27:11 PM, Lizzie Triano wrote:

                    <<But seriously, maybe some of his other books were more mainstream novel
                    types. I can't imagine _Forest of Forever_ carrying any such argument.
                    >>

                    No, not really. His work is pretty much all of a piece, although, as I
                    mentioned, his earlier work tended to be lighter and more sentimental than his later
                    work. The message in his books -- if it could be called something as strong
                    as that -- is that the world of Classical mythological creatures was a place
                    for guilt-free sex, and as such far superior to Puritanical Christianity (one
                    can easily see how, if one takes this seriously enough, it can come across as
                    "silly"). However (with a very few exceptions), he usually avoids making this
                    point too earnestly or heavily.
                    Alexei
                  • Elizabeth Apgar Triano
                    No, not really. His work is pretty much all of a piece, although, as I mentioned, his earlier work tended to be lighter and more sentimental than his later
                    Message 9 of 14 , Oct 1, 2003
                    • 0 Attachment
                      No, not really. His work is pretty much all of a piece, although, as I
                      mentioned, his earlier work tended to be lighter and more sentimental than
                      his later
                      work. The message in his books -- if it could be called something as strong
                      as that -- is that the world of Classical mythological creatures was a
                      place
                      for guilt-free sex, and as such far superior to Puritanical Christianity
                      (one
                      can easily see how, if one takes this seriously enough, it can come across
                      as
                      "silly"). However (with a very few exceptions), he usually avoids making
                      this
                      point too earnestly or heavily. >>

                      Which is not a bad thing certainly! Some otherwise wonderful series
                      (serieses?) have been derailed by the author's love for his or her
                      "message". Like that Holy Mole in the Duncton books, and I"m not sure
                      quite what in Lawhead's Arthurian tales.

                      I wonder, if you followed up some of these dryads and satyrs in later
                      years, if the heartaches and diseases from their guilt-free sex might give
                      a little common sense room to enter? Or I suppose they are all sharing
                      their tales of woe in some dark, smoky honky-tonk.

                      Lizzie Triano
                      lizziewriter@...
                      amor vincit omnia
                    • Kevin Bowring
                      ... I understand about being ticked at organized religion, but I don t think I would really like gods whose actions are suitable for the front pages of the
                      Message 10 of 14 , Oct 1, 2003
                      • 0 Attachment
                        Elizabeth Apgar Triano wrote:

                        > Some of the things I've read said that the novels were about how the "old
                        > gods" were better. In other words, they were saying that the Greek and
                        > Roman
                        > gods were better than anything we have today. >>
                        >
                        > Considering how ticked I am at organized religion at the moment, I'd be
                        > vulnerable to that line of argument -- except that it would have to be
                        > another set of gods. I am thinking a basic nature spirituality might work
                        > nicely.

                        I understand about being "ticked" at organized religion, but I don't think I
                        would really like gods whose actions are suitable for the front pages of the
                        tabloids.

                        Cheers,
                        Kevin
                      • Elizabeth Apgar Triano
                        I understand about being ticked at organized religion, but I don t think I would really like gods whose actions are suitable for the front pages of the
                        Message 11 of 14 , Oct 2, 2003
                        • 0 Attachment
                          I understand about being "ticked" at organized religion, but I don't think I
                          would really like gods whose actions are suitable for the front pages of the
                          tabloids. >>

                          Oh you're right of course; in a deity as well as a spouse, I prefer mystery
                          to entertainment. But as you pointed out in another post about another
                          subject, sometimes sheer entertainment value is a healthy thing too.

                          Lizzie Triano
                          lizziewriter@...
                          amor vincit omnia
                        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.