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Re: [mythsoc] A question in Tolkien Criticism

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  • Stolzi@aol.com
    Seems to me that the British in WWI - at least, the ones who weren t totally disaffected by it all (War Poets) - would have thought of themselves not so much
    Message 1 of 9 , Sep 27, 2003
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      Seems to me that the British in WWI - at least, the ones who weren't totally
      disaffected by it all (War Poets) - would have thought of themselves not so
      much as Northern, as representing "the forces of Christian civilization" -
      everything all the way from Jerusalem through Rome and Europe to the North -
      against Barbarism from the East - they even called the Germans "the Hun." This
      although the Kaiser by no means disavowed Judeo-Christian civilization in the
      way that Hitler did, and though the German atrocities in -that- war were largely
      propaganda inventions iirc. I think of Belloc: "Europe is the Faith, the
      Faith is Europe."

      There was not nearly the sense of a "desperate and possibly losing last
      stand", I think, that the British had in the later conflict - Dunkirk, the Battle
      of Britain, and "we shall fight them on the beaches..." etc. - a conflict
      which hadn't yet happened when Tolkien delivered BEOWULF: THE MONSTER AND THE
      CRITICS.


      Diamond Proudbrook



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