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Re: [mythsoc] Audio Books: Read or Listen?

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  • David S Bratman
    ... On a related topic of terminology, I just read this comment from an interview with Michael Hingson, a blind man who calmly hitched up his guide dog and
    Message 1 of 3 , Sep 7, 2003
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      On Aug. 16, 2003, Mari Dole wrote:

      >Mari Dole wrote of "reading" the audio book. My understanding is that
      >this is customary usage in the blind community.
      >
      >- David Bratman
      >
      >Yes, it is. I think it's why those who produce audio books are often
      >called narrators, not readers.

      On a related topic of terminology, I just read this comment from an
      interview with Michael Hingson, a blind man who calmly hitched up his guide
      dog and walked downstairs out of the World Trade Center on that tragic
      day. He prefers to avoid the term "seeing-eye dog," and says:

      "We're all looking around. If you look in the dictionary, 'see' doesn't
      necessarily mean with the eyes. 'See' means to perceive."

      I see what he means. Also, I hear what he's saying.

      - David Bratman
    • SusanPal@aol.com
      In a message dated 9/7/2003 12:16:20 PM Pacific Standard Time, ... The 9/11 guide-dog story I heard was about a blind man who, in all the chaos, assumed that
      Message 2 of 3 , Sep 7, 2003
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        In a message dated 9/7/2003 12:16:20 PM Pacific Standard Time,
        dbratman@... writes:

        > I just read this comment from an
        > interview with Michael Hingson, a blind man who calmly hitched up his guide
        > dog and walked downstairs out of the World Trade Center on that tragic
        > day.

        The 9/11 guide-dog story I heard was about a blind man who, in all the chaos,
        assumed that he'd never be able to get out (he was on a pretty high floor),
        but who unhitched his dog so it could get out. The dog started to bolt in
        panic -- but then stopped, turned around, came back to its person, and guided him
        down to safety.

        Is this the same person?

        Susan


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • David S Bratman
        ... I think it s the same person, but if so, the story you heard seems to have been distorted. In the versions I ve read, the dog wasn t released, because she
        Message 3 of 3 , Sep 7, 2003
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          At 04:38 PM 9/7/2003 -0400, Susan wrote:

          >The 9/11 guide-dog story I heard was about a blind man who, in all the chaos,
          >assumed that he'd never be able to get out (he was on a pretty high floor),
          >but who unhitched his dog so it could get out. The dog started to bolt in
          >panic -- but then stopped, turned around, came back to its person, and
          >guided him
          >down to safety.
          >
          >Is this the same person?

          I think it's the same person, but if so, the story you heard seems to have
          been distorted. In the versions I've read, the dog wasn't released,
          because she wasn't on duty at the time. (Hingson was working and hadn't
          been planning on going anywhere for a while, and the dog was napping.) She
          didn't bolt away and come back for him, but had jumped up ready to go at
          the moment the plane hit the tower.

          - David Bratman
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