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Re: [mythsoc] Interesting things in the latest issue of _The Lewis Legacy_

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  • David S Bratman
    ... There s a news report here: http://www.tolkienonline.com/docs/12876.html It quotes from a joint statement by Perry and the Tolkien estate: As Mr Perry has
    Message 1 of 3 , Sep 7, 2003
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      At 01:29 PM 9/7/2003 -0400, WendellWag@... wrote:

      >One is that Mike Perry will be
      >publishing this year his chronology of _The Lord of the Rings_, which will be
      >called _Untangling Tolkien_. If you recall, we discussed this last year on
      >this mailing list. The Tolkien estate attempted to stop the publication
      >of his
      >chronology on the basis that it wasn't any more than a slight
      >re-arrangement of
      >Tolkien's works. Perry fought this on the basis that in fact his book was
      >much more than that. _The Lewis Legacy_ doesn't say anything about how the
      >issues were resolved except that there was an out-of-court settlement.

      There's a news report here:
      http://www.tolkienonline.com/docs/12876.html

      It quotes from a joint statement by Perry and the Tolkien estate: "As Mr
      Perry has substantially changed the book, the estate has withdrawn its
      objection to publication of the book, but does not approve or in any way
      endorse the book as published."

      Anyone who's interested in sorting out the detailed internal chronology of
      events in Tolkien's stories should take a look at this:
      http://www.chronology.org/tolkien/

      It's a meticulously detailed page-by-page breakdown of LOTR, The Hobbit,
      The Silmarillion, and Unfinished Tales into chunks arranged in strict
      internal chronological order. (Or so it says: I haven't really checked it
      out.)


      >There was a book published last year called _Inklings: Book One of the Oxford
      >Chronicles by Melanie M. Jeschke. The descriptions I have seen (just Google
      >on the author's name and the title for some of them) make it sound like it's
      >an attempt to take the story of _Shadowlands_ and make it into a series of
      >romance novels.

      Doing so gives the impression that the book is intended for a teenage
      audience, and is marketed largely through Christian bookstores. My
      immediate question about the novel is, how do the actual Inklings fit into
      the plot? The answer is, tangentially. The clearest description, at
      http://www.xulonpress.com/bookstore/titles/1931232849.htm, says that the
      story is set in 1964, the romantic hero is "a young lecturer who carries on
      the legacy of his friend and mentor C.S. Lewis to a new generation of
      students," and that Tolkien makes a cameo appearance. (Also, Lord David
      Cecil solves a crime at the heroine's college, and the ghost of Williams is
      wandering around Oxford, not realizing it's dead. <g>)


      >Little Lea, Lewis's childhood home, is on sale. Hey, how about we all
      >combine our resources and buy the place to preserve it? It's only about a
      >million
      >British pounds.

      I thought Little Lea had been torn down, or at least remodeled to the point
      of unrecognizability, many years ago. But maybe I'm misremembering something.

      - David Bratman
    • Stolzi@aol.com
      In a message dated 9/7/2003 12:33:05 PM Central Daylight Time, ... I was looking at a photo of Little Lea just the other day in ALL MY ROAD BEFORE ME, and
      Message 2 of 3 , Sep 7, 2003
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        In a message dated 9/7/2003 12:33:05 PM Central Daylight Time,
        WendellWag@... writes:


        > Little Lea, Lewis's childhood home, is on sale.

        I was looking at a photo of Little Lea just the other day in ALL MY ROAD
        BEFORE ME, and agreeing heartily with Lewis' own remark in SURPRISED BY JOY that
        his father was cheated by the builder.

        The front is the ugliest, most barren example of non-architecture you could
        hope to see on such a large and expensive house. And I don't think it's the
        taste of the period, I think it's just an example of Albert Lewis' hopeless
        talent for getting things wrong.

        Diamond Proudbrook


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