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9103Re: [mythsoc] Cheesy movies (WAS In defense of B5 poesie (was Trek Theory))

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  • David S. Bratman
    May 1, 2003
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      At 03:01 PM 4/30/2003 , Ernest wrote:

      >I read an essay once that made me realize what makes a cheesy movie good:
      > it's utterly necessary that the makers of the movie, even if they poke
      >occasional fun at the heroes of the movie, _love_ their heroes. Any hint
      >of contempt, any tinge of cynicism, dooms the movie instantly. That's
      >why a ridiculous movie like, say, _A Knight's Tale_ is still tremendous
      >fun to watch, and why movies that take great pains to announce that
      >they're in on the joke and that they _know_ that the characters are
      >complete idiots, like, oh, _Robin Hood: Men in Tights_ or _Scary Movie_,
      >provide only pallid enjoyment at best. (To me, anyway.)

      There may be some truth in this - it's obvious, not least from his own
      comments on the show, that Mel Brooks loves Max and Leo in a way he
      couldn't care for Robin Hood, which is why _The Producers_ (both versions)
      is better than _Men in Tights_.

      But: I bet Kevin Costner loves Robin Hood, or at least thinks he does. And
      I'd rather see _Men in Tights_ again (in fact, I just did, by happenstance)
      than see Costner's _Robin Hood_ even once (which unfortunately I also did).


      From elsewhere:

      >Ooh, a supposedly Christian bishop using the politically correct "B.C.E."
      >form! Tres moderne!

      It's not just a PC form. It's the standard Jewish form. I realize this is
      irrelevant to the usage of a Christian bishop, but I wanted to point that out.


      >Apropos of nothing, are there any eBook dictionaries (PalmOS, Microsoft,
      >Acrobat, whatever--I can interconvert) that don't suck? I made the
      >mistake of paying $20 for the "Pocket Oxford", which is a terrible
      >dictionary: few words, no etymologies, no pronunciation. At least
      >there's a decent freeware encyclopedia (Wikipedia.)

      I can't answer your question, but though Wikipedia is great fun (I've
      contributed to it myself) I can point to, shall we say, a more consistently
      useful freeware encyclopedia: the Columbia Encyclopedia, online at
      <http://www.bartleby.com/65/> with a lot of other free reference books.
      The only catch is, it's loaded with popup windows. But I use Pop-Up
      Stopper so I don't much care.

      - David Bratman
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