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24134Re: [mythsoc] naugladur

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  • Andrew Higgins
    Feb 21, 2013
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      John

      One more thing to add - on the Qenya word NAUKA this is more likely derived from the Qenya base root NAQA- steal, take, get by stealth, unlawfully from which is derived

      nak (q) - anything stolen, a theft, a trick
      naqa- steal (past tense nanqe)
      naqar - thief     (PE 12: 64)

      Seems like a much more appropriate Elvish etymology (given The Tale of the Nauglafring from the Elvish perspective) for dwarves then 'bite or sour'

      Thanks, Andy

      On Feb 21, 2013, at 10:42 PM, Andrew Higgins <asthiggins@...> wrote:

      John

      Hello.  Happened to have all the early language Parmas open when I saw this email so did some quick glossing -

      In the Gnomish Lexicon - the first part of his name (NAUGL) is glossed as (PE 11: 59)

      - NAUGL - same as NAUG (a dwarf) from Qenya NAUKA
      - NAUGLA - of or belonging to the dwarves
      - NAUGLAFEL - dwarf natured i.e. - mean, avaricious (Greek - aischrokerods)

      Now there is no Qenya word for NAUKA - there is the Qenya Base Root NAKA bite which has a past tense form NAUKE - so perhaps the Qenya word is related either to bite (biting rock) or a more negative sense NAKSA means sour.  In the Qenya Phonology there is a note (PE 12: 10) about NAUVA meaning 'Giant is a word of the Uvanimor.  Naxua entered Eldarin during their stay in Valinor - possibly again an Elvish negative meaning for Dwarf.  Interesting crux!

      Nautar 'dwarves'  appears in the 'The Creatures of the Earth' (PE 14: 9)

      Forms of the word NAUG are also found in the Qenya fragment Text VII of Lost Tales F (PE 15: 15) which is a fragment from the Story of the Naugafring - here NAUGLA is 'dwarf'

      DUR - could possibly come from the Qenya base root TUR (PE 12: 96) with the consonant mutation changing the /T/ to /D/  (PE 11: 7)

      So that gets us to 'A King Who Belongs to Dwarves.'

      Hope that helps. 

      Best, Andy

      On Feb 21, 2013, at 10:00 PM, John Rateliff <sacnoth@...> wrote:

       

         Here's another quick language-related question: is there an official gloss to the name Naugladur, the dwarf-lord of Nogrod in THE BOOK OF LOST TALES? I assume it means essentially "Lord of Dwarves" but didn't find it translated anywhere in HME. 

          As usual, any help much appreciated.
      --John R.
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