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17222Re: [mythsoc] Re: mythology for England

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  • Walter Padgett
    Nov 27, 2006
      Congradulations, Jason.

      You have pinched the _flea_ that Stenstrom, Anders Stenström so
      carefully identified way back in 1992, which is about 15 years ago.
      No wonder nobody knows that his "theory (probably correct) about how
      the misquote" _may_ "have entered into common usage (pointing to his
      paper in the Proceedings of the 1992 Centenary Conference)" . This
      issue, the issue of where the (exact) phrase actually comes from was
      _scientifically_ and objectively resolved in Stenström's short but
      excellent article. He is the hero, but you have to understand that
      Textual Criticism is an objective science, not theory or (as Bratman
      would say) "quibble" that can be argued back and forth. It is
      something as simple as the _rule_ for when to use one quote ' instead
      of two quotes " when quoting someone who is quoting someone (and the
      confusion that can and does surround such instances in all of academic
      writing) which seeded and sprouted the vast and amazing world of
      criticism surrounding the phrase "_Tolkien's Art: A Mythology for
      England_ by Jane Chance Nitzsche."

      As a light, as a single star of Varda, she came to me. Not through
      some obscure discussion within an incomprehensible (to me as a
      _budding_ Tolkien scholar) biography, a _masterful_ handling of
      Tolkien's life and work (Carpenter's).

      But it is through the picking out and the opening up and the reading
      of the full title of Chance's first book, regardless of any of its
      further content, that I (and many, many others in this world) first
      became aware of the notion that Tolkien wrote a myth for everyone who
      speaks English.

      Wow!

      I defend her not as a scholar, but as a mother, of sorts. I defend
      her diligent acts and the valiance of her struggle in the face of so
      many nay-sayers.

      Tolkien lives! And this in part because of the tireless work of Jane
      Chance, PhD., Rice Univ., Houston, Texas.
      http://www.ruf.rice.edu/~jchance/

      She needs no defense. Nor would I essay to offer one.

      http://www.ruf.rice.edu/~jchance/

      Thanks, Walter./crazywalter....


      On 11/27/06, Jason Fisher <visualweasel@...> wrote:
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      > > Jason - Did you? Very good. I hope someday to see this book, to which I contributed
      > > a fair amount I followed your advice to write to that person at the publisher, and got
      > > back an auto-reply saying she's out till later this week.
      >
      > Thanksgiving delays, no doubt; but having been successful myself, I'm sure you will be, too. If Taylor & Francis has basically decided that "encyclopedias aren't profitable," then as far as I'm concerned, they may as well pass out their 800 (instead of 2500) copies to the contributors and others who really care about *this* encyclopedia.
      >
      > > Did you cite Letter no. 180 to "Mr Thompson"? That contains the phrase "present
      > > them [the English] with a mythology of their own," which to my mind is a clearer
      > > indication of his intent in this respect than the more commonly cited paragraph from
      > > the Waldman letter.
      >
      > I did indeed, David. I also cited the Waldman letter, but I led off with the Thompson letter as the stronger, closer evidence. I also summarized Anders Stenström's theory (probably correct) about how the misquote may have entered into common usage (pointing to his paper in the Proceedings of the 1992 Centenary Conference).
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      > Jason Fisher
      >
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