Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

15381Quoting Homer & Jethro to the tune of Jim Reeves' 'He'll Have To Go':

Expand Messages
  • Mike Foster
    Aug 6, 2005
      "As the tomcat said when he kissed the skunk, 'Though it's been grand
      I've enjoyed about all of this that I can stand'."

      No offense & I'll come back later, but after an eight-armed twelve-hour
      day of tweaking & polishing & printing out two papers for Brum, getting
      23 days of England>Geneva>Burgundy region>Alps packed into one carrion
      bag, and getting my Gilbert magazine piece on Brideshead Rev. by E.
      Waugh from nada to down from 756 to 706 words with 106 still to be cut
      by Sunday night, I am as toasted as a crumpet.

      John Updike was in Peoria speaking right after Rabbit At Rest was
      published in '99? and I asked him if we had seen the last of Rabbit.

      JU: 'Well, he wasn't looking very good the last time I saw him'

      Balderdoodahdash; there was
      a prequel in the New Yorker within months.

      But carry on & carrion. I'll be back. I go to watch Scorpio rising
      over the corn crib at Foster's Farm with a wee glass of plonk.

      Take good care of that kitten, Berni.

      Cheers,
      Mike




      Walkermonk@... wrote:

      >
      >In a message dated 7/25/2005 10:46:27 PM Central Standard Time,
      >saraciborski@... writes:
      >
      >Well, I will venture an opinion contrary to David's scathing one (and
      >to the negative views expressed in a couple of other posts). I love
      >all the Harry Potter books and I think the 6th, though not the best
      >of the lot, is a great read. They are not literary masterpieces and
      >the themes are at times muddled. But they are wonderfully engaging
      >portrayals of some delightful characters, both children and adults.
      >What draws me into Rowling's world and holds me there through
      >occasional lapses in the writing is Harry himself: what counts in the
      >story, what decides the outcome is not the magic tricks he does but
      >his mix of courage, determination, longing (for his parents),
      >ingenuity, loyalty, recklessness, fun-lovingness and other qualities
      >that develop as he grows up. I would have missed getting to know him,
      >had Rowling stopped with the bright, fresh and bouncy first book.
      >
      >Sara Ciborski
      >
      >
      >
      >-------------
      >
      >Sara, I agree with many of your points. In contrast to David B.'s
      >experience, I found the first one to be enjoyable like candy is enjoyable -- sweet,
      >quick, and gone. The second one didn't do much more for me, I enjoyed the third
      >and fourth, and hated much of the fifth. In fact, I was actually angry about
      >the fifth one. It had a couple of really good scenes, but the overall
      >structure and the ending conversation between Dumbledore and Harry especially grated
      >on me. And then somehow I find myself loving "Half-Blood Prince." I really
      >feel strongly about it.
      >
      >Thanks for your post!
      >Grace Monk
      >
      >
      >
      >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      >
      >The Mythopoeic Society website http://www.mythsoc.org
      >Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
    • Show all 30 messages in this topic