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14573Re: [mythsoc] The people for the myth ?

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  • Elizabeth Apgar Triano
    Apr 5, 2005
      That's quite amusing, but it doesn't help. So I guess I can take that as a
      "Yeah, he wrote for the basic 20th Century mix," the same way that someone
      today, here in the States, could attempt, with probably less success, to
      create an epic for the various waves of wilfully or accidentally murderous
      ethnic groups that have emigrated (and mixed) over the years.


      Oh, wait a sec: that would be Johnny Cash.


      You know, not everyone is as thick-skinned as I am. Someone else might
      have been hurt by that bit of entertaining prose.


      Thanks.

      Lizzie

      Elizabeth Apgar Triano
      lizziewriter@...
      amor vincit omnia
      www.lizziewriter.com
      www.danburymineralogicalsociety.org


      > [Original Message]
      > From: David Bratman <dbratman@...>
      > To: <mythsoc@yahoogroups.com>
      > Date: 4/5/2005 1:05:09 AM
      > Subject: Re: [mythsoc] The people for the myth ?
      >
      >
      > At 02:28 PM 4/4/2005 -0400, Lizzie wrote:
      >
      > >But not all English are descended from the Angles and Saxons. Some are
      > >Celtic. Some are Norman. Did Tolkien write for all of them?
      >
      > That's right, Lizzie: Tolkien only wrote for pure-blood Anglo-Saxons. All
      > of those Celts and Normans, not to mention new Britons whose ancestors
      came
      > from places like Africa and India, can get nothing out of Tolkien.
      Readers
      > of these non-pure ancestries were seen on the streets holding his books
      > upside-down and scratching their heads, and this was so embarrassing that
      a
      > law was passed requiring Brits to submit verified genealogical trees
      > showing their pure Anglo-Saxon ancestry back to 400 A.D. before they're
      > allowed to read his books. Tolkien himself had one ancestor who
      immigrated
      > from Germany in the 18th century, so he was not permitted to consult his
      > own published work. That's the reason he had so much trouble completing
      > the Silmarillion.
      >
      > (sigh)
      >
      >
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