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10305Re: [mythsoc] Shippey's Road

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  • Elizabeth Apgar Triano
    Nov 1, 2003
      It's a branch of linguistics, and today it's rarely called by that name.
      It's
      the study of the way past stages of languages have been attested through
      texts, and nowadays it's usually considered an aspect of historical
      linguistics. >>

      Thank you, Alexei. So there is always a sense of change, life, or growth
      in this concept?

      << The people that did philology were probably halfway between the people
      today
      who do classics and other ancient languages and the ones who do historical
      linguistics. Today you have to choose whether to study a particular ancient
      language or to study the theory of how languages change over time, but then
      it
      wasn't divided that way. Linguistics got organized as a subject for
      academic
      study by coming together of the people who studied ancient languages,
      modern
      languages, anthropology, psychology, and logic because they had decided
      they had a
      common subject to investigate. (Not all those people got together at once.
      In approximately the order that I listed them, the subjects came together
      to
      form linguistics.) >>

      Ow, Wendell, that makes my head hurt! I mean, thank you. There is a lot
      of work in these subjects, and I don't want to imagine how much
      fractiousness. I don't think I would have made a good scholar, but I
      enjoy reading Shippey. It's hard to describe, but the effect I am getting
      is probably similar to what they call a paradigm shift -- it's like
      suddenly realizing that the earth's axis is tilted. The more examples he
      gives of texts, the more I wish to sit in for a lecture series and extended
      reading. But I fear that popular writing is about the limit of my
      abilities. It's amazing to think how much has been gleaned from the
      primary sources we have had to go on, and then of course so much of it is
      theory that changes over time.

      Come to think of it, I have had heady experiences from other books. It's
      just been a while. lol

      Kids grow up eventually. You could go back to school if you want. >>

      Perhaps. There seemed little application to balance the immense financial
      outlay when I was first considering it. Graduate school, I mean. For a
      number of years I dreamed of returning to study Medieval French, but quite
      frankly, modern French was challenging enough. I'd have sunk. The world
      is such a huge place, and layer it with the many worlds there have been,
      and the many views of those worlds, and the courses of study are so endless
      as to be overwhelming. Yet how often, in the world outside of academia,
      does any value, or even yearning, seem to be placed towards such study ?

      I like some of what Shippey handles about luck and such; I'm a bit
      superstitious that way myself. So perhaps there is hope. After all, one
      likes to think that Mom and Dad didn't spend all that money on my education
      for nothing, that what potential I may have will not go entirely to waste.

      Lizzie Triano
      lizziewriter@...
      amor vincit omnia
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