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GS!000G

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  • michaelsucharski
    I took off the valve cover on my GS to check the valve clearance. There were two broken studs in the cover. The inside #1 intake screw and the inside #2
    Message 1 of 7 , May 14, 2017
      I took off the valve cover on my GS to check the valve clearance.  There were two broken studs in the cover.  The inside #1 intake screw and the inside #2 exhaust.  My question is there are 16 total studs calling for 6.5 lb. ft./0.9kg-m.  Since this is not really a pressurized area of the engine, with a new gasket can I get buy with just 14 bolts if I can't get the two broken ones out?
       
                                              Mikey in Wisconsin 
    • Dan hatfield
      having all the bolts helps to prevent warping of the cover.to remove the broken studs:  soak each stud with KANO BRAND AEROKROIL penetrating oil.  this stuff
      Message 2 of 7 , May 14, 2017
        having all the bolts helps to prevent warping of the cover.
        to remove the broken studs:  soak each stud with KANO BRAND AEROKROIL penetrating oil.  this stuff will soak its way out of a spray can.  can you grab the studs with a vice grip?  soak the studs for a day or two.  hit the broken stud on the end with a small hammer-you are not driving the screw, just making it ring with the vibration.  this helps the oil get into the thread.  sometimes, heating the screw with a big soldering gun helps.  sometimes a srewdriver slot can be cut into the screw shank with a dremel cutoff wheel or hacksaw blade.  clean the vacated thread with a tap of the right size before re-assembly (maybe even cleaning all the threads?)
        if the screw must be drilled for removal, take it to a machine shop and have it removed professionally so that the threaded hole in the casting isn't further damaged.

        dan h.



        From: "rmikey1such@... [mysuzuki]" <mysuzuki@yahoogroups.com>
        To: mysuzuki@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Sunday, May 14, 2017 10:53 AM
        Subject: [mysuzuki] GS!000G

         
        I took off the valve cover on my GS to check the valve clearance.  There were two broken studs in the cover.  The inside #1 intake screw and the inside #2 exhaust.  My question is there are 16 total studs calling for 6.5 lb. ft./0.9kg-m.  Since this is not really a pressurized area of the engine, with a new gasket can I get buy with just 14 bolts if I can't get the two broken ones out?
         
                                                Mikey in Wisconsin 


      • michaelsucharski
        Dan, I ve been spraying the two broken studs with PT Blaster recommended by my Son who repairs jet skis. There may be enough room to try and flatten the top
        Message 3 of 7 , May 15, 2017
          Dan,
           
              I've been spraying the two broken studs with PT Blaster recommended by my Son who repairs jet skis.  There may be enough room to try and flatten the top of the broken studs. I will try that and then try and loosen the studs with a small vise grips.  As a last resort, I'm thinking about the possibility of maybe looking for a couple of small C clamps and clamp it down from the outside (won't look pretty).  Taking it to a machine shop might be cost prohibitive.  Maybe I'll just start looking for another top end or another engine.
           
              Thanks for getting me to do a little thinking.  This GS is almost pristine with only 31K on it and I have a lot of spare parts (sans engine).  Since I already have a running Cavalcade, time is on my side.
           
                                                          Mikey
           
          In a message dated 5/15/2017 12:21:03 A.M. Central Daylight Time, mysuzuki@yahoogroups.com writes:
           

          having all the bolts helps to prevent warping of the cover.
          to remove the broken studs:  soak each stud with KANO BRAND AEROKROIL penetrating oil.  this stuff will soak its way out of a spray can.  can you grab the studs with a vice grip?  soak the studs for a day or two.  hit the broken stud on the end with a small hammer-you are not driving the screw, just making it ring with the vibration.  this helps the oil get into the thread.  sometimes, heating the screw with a big soldering gun helps.  sometimes a srewdriver slot can be cut into the screw shank with a dremel cutoff wheel or hacksaw blade.  clean the vacated thread with a tap of the right size before re-assembly (maybe even cleaning all the threads?)< /div>
          if the screw must be drilled for removal, take it to a machine shop and have it removed professionally so that the threaded hole in the casting isn't further damaged.

          dan h.



          From: "rmikey1such@... [mysuzuki]" <mysuzuki@yahoogroups.com>
          To: mysuzuki@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Sunday, May 14, 2017 10:53 AM
          Subject: [mysuzuki] GS!000G

           
          I took off the valve cover on my GS to check the valve clearance.  There were two broken studs in the cover.  The inside #1 intake screw and the inside #2 exhaust.  My question is there are 16 total studs calling for 6.5 lb. ft./0.9kg-m.  Since this is not really a pressurized area of the engine, with a new gasket can I get buy with just 14 bolts if I can't get the two broken ones out?
           
                                                  Mikey in Wisconsin 


        • Bruce Rock
          I m in Kaukauna, if you are close by and need Kano oil, you can borrow my can. Just recently I sprayed a needle nose pliers that had rusted shut with it, let
          Message 4 of 7 , May 15, 2017
            I'm in Kaukauna, if you are close by and need Kano oil, you can borrow my can.

            Just recently I sprayed a needle nose pliers that had rusted shut with it, let it sit for a day, sprayed it again, let it set, waited a day and still couldn't open it.  Tried the wax method (put a dab of candle wax on the pivot point, held it over gas range flame) Could than open it by hand.  Can't really say which worked for me: Kano, the heat, or the wax or all three.





            On Monday, May 15, 2017 7:41 AM, "rmikey1such@... [mysuzuki]" <mysuzuki@yahoogroups.com> wrote:


             
            Dan,
             
                I've been spraying the two broken studs with PT Blaster recommended by my Son who repairs jet skis.  There may be enough room to try and flatten the top of the broken studs. I will try that and then try and loosen the studs with a small vise grips.  As a last resort, I'm thinking about the possibility of maybe looking for a couple of small C clamps and clamp it down from the outside (won't look pretty).  Taking it to a machine shop might be cost prohibitive.  Maybe I'll just start looking for another top end or another engine.
             
                Thanks for getting me to do a little thinking.  This GS is almost pristine with only 31K on it and I have a lot of spare parts (sans engine).  Since I already have a running Cavalcade, time is on my side.
             
                                                            Mikey
             
            In a message dated 5/15/2017 12:21:03 A.M. Central Daylight Time, mysuzuki@yahoogroups.com writes:
             
            having all the bolts helps to prevent warping of the cover.
            to remove the broken studs:  soak each stud with KANO BRAND AEROKROIL penetrating oil.  this stuff will soak its way out of a spray can.  can you grab the studs with a vice grip?  soak the studs for a day or two.  hit the broken stud on the end with a small hammer-you are not driving the screw, just making it ring with the vibration.  this helps the oil get into the thread.  sometimes, heating the screw with a big soldering gun helps.  sometimes a srewdriver slot can be cut into the screw shank with a dremel cutoff wheel or hacksaw blade.  clean the vacated thread with a tap of the right size before re-assembly (maybe even cleaning all the threads?)< /div>
            if the screw must be drilled for removal, take it to a machine shop and have it removed professionally so that the threaded hole in the casting isn't further damaged.

            dan h.



            From: "rmikey1such@... [mysuzuki]" <mysuzuki@yahoogroups.com>
            To: mysuzuki@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Sunday, May 14, 2017 10:53 AM
            Subject: [mysuzuki] GS!000G

             
            I took off the valve cover on my GS to check the valve clearance.  There were two broken studs in the cover.  The inside #1 intake screw and the inside #2 exhaust.  My question is there are 16 total studs calling for 6.5 lb. ft./0.9kg-m.  Since this is not really a pressurized area of the engine, with a new gasket can I get buy with just 14 bolts if I can't get the two broken ones out?
             
                                                    Mikey in Wisconsin 




          • Dan hatfield
            i have been doing this kind of work since 1980 while working for a public utility power plant located on the ocean beach.  i have tested with a torque wrench
            Message 5 of 7 , May 15, 2017
              i have been doing this kind of work since 1980 while working for a public utility power plant located on the ocean beach.  i have tested with a torque wrench dozens of penetrating oils against rust and corrosion seized bolts and studs from size 4 up to steam turbine casing bolts of 3 inch diameter.  i have found that the aerokroil far and away works better than anything except an mixture of acetone and dexron atf which was a near second.  
              usually stud removal should only take a short time and isn't extremely expensive unless done by Electrical discharge machining (EDM).  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electrical_discharge_machining#Small_hole_drilling

              when you add this technique to kroil it becomes fairly easy but still doesn't compare to edm for speed or effiiency.

              dan








              From: "rmikey1such@... [mysuzuki]" <mysuzuki@yahoogroups.com>
              To: mysuzuki@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Monday, May 15, 2017 5:41 AM
              Subject: Re: [mysuzuki] GS!000G

               
              Dan,
               
                  I've been spraying the two broken studs with PT Blaster recommended by my Son who repairs jet skis.  There may be enough room to try and flatten the top of the broken studs. I will try that and then try and loosen the studs with a small vise grips.  As a last resort, I'm thinking about the possibility of maybe looking for a couple of small C clamps and clamp it down from the outside (won't look pretty).  Taking it to a machine shop might be cost prohibitive.  Maybe I'll just start looking for another top end or another engine.
               
                  Thanks for getting me to do a little thinking.  This GS is almost pristine with only 31K on it and I have a lot of spare parts (sans engine).  Since I already have a running Cavalcade, time is on my side.
               
                                                              Mikey
               
              In a message dated 5/15/2017 12:21:03 A.M. Central Daylight Time, mysuzuki@yahoogroups.com writes:
               
              having all the bolts helps to prevent warping of the cover.
              to remove the broken studs:  soak each stud with KANO BRAND AEROKROIL penetrating oil.  this stuff will soak its way out of a spray can.  can you grab the studs with a vice grip?  soak the studs for a day or two.  hit the broken stud on the end with a small hammer-you are not driving the screw, just making it ring with the vibration.  this helps the oil get into the thread.  sometimes, heating the screw with a big soldering gun helps.  sometimes a srewdriver slot can be cut into the screw shank with a dremel cutoff wheel or hacksaw blade.  clean the vacated thread with a tap of the right size before re-assembly (maybe even cleaning all the threads?)< /div>
              if the screw must be drilled for removal, take it to a machine shop and have it removed professionally so that the threaded hole in the casting isn't further damaged.

              dan h.



              From: "rmikey1such@... [mysuzuki]" <mysuzuki@yahoogroups.com>
              To: mysuzuki@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Sunday, May 14, 2017 10:53 AM
              Subject: [mysuzuki] GS!000G

               
              I took off the valve cover on my GS to check the valve clearance.  There were two broken studs in the cover.  The inside #1 intake screw and the inside #2 exhaust.  My question is there are 16 total studs calling for 6.5 lb. ft./0.9kg-m.  Since this is not really a pressurized area of the engine, with a new gasket can I get buy with just 14 bolts if I can't get the two broken ones out?
               
                                                      Mikey in Wisconsin 




            • michaelsucharski
              Dan, While taking out the other 14 bolts, I became quite aware that the valves might never have been checked. Maybe 6 of them came out with little trouble.
              Message 6 of 7 , May 15, 2017
                Dan,
                 
                    While taking out the other 14 bolts, I became quite aware that the valves might never have been checked.  Maybe 6 of them came out with little trouble.  The rest were tough to come out.  They were full of crud.  One of the things I learned from being a Journeyman Industrial Electrician for 38 years is there can always be a plan "B" and "C".  I will check out the aerokroil.  One thing I'm aware of is the size of the hole. If I wanted to, I could run a 1/4 20 (inch) tap into each hole without pre drilling and go to stainless bolts (had to do it on my GS850G.  Worked fine).  The stock bolts are soft enough that I could grind the broken ones flush with the head and drill those two out. 
                 
                    I'm going to beat this one with your help.
                 
                                                                                Mikey
                 
                In a message dated 5/15/2017 9:46:47 A.M. Central Daylight Time, mysuzuki@yahoogroups.com writes:
                 

                i have been doing this kind of work since 1980 while working for a public utility power plant located on the ocean beach.  i have tested with a torque wrench dozens of penetrating oils against rust and corrosion seized bolts and studs from size 4 up to steam turbine casing bolts of 3 inch diameter.  i have found that the aerokroil far and away works better than anything except an mixture of acetone and dexron atf which was a near second.  
                usually stud removal should only take a short time and isn't extremely expensive unless done by Electrical discharge machining (EDM).  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electrical_discharge_machining#Small_hole_drilling

                when you add this technique to kroil it becomes fairly easy but still doesn't compare to edm for speed or effiiency.

                dan

                [Unable to display image]






                From: "rmikey1such@... [mysuzuki]" <mysuzuki@yahoogroups.com>
                To: mysuzuki@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Monday, May 15, 2017 5:41 AM
                Subject: Re: [mysuzuki] GS!000G

                 
                Dan,
                 
                    I've been spraying the two broken studs with PT Blaster recommended by my Son who repairs jet skis.  There may be enough room to try and flatten the top of the broken studs. I will try that and then try and loosen the studs with a small vise grips.  As a last resort, I'm thinking about the possibility of maybe looking for a couple of small C clamps and clamp it down from the outside (won't look pretty).  Taking it to a machine shop might be cost prohibitive.  Maybe I'll just start looking for another top end or another engine.
                 
                    Thanks for getting me to do a little thinking.  This GS is almost pristine with only 31K on it and I have a lot of spare parts (sans engine).  Since I already have a running Cavalcade, time is on my side.
                 
                                                                Mikey
                 
                In a message dated 5/15/2017 12:21:03 A.M. Central Daylight Time, mysuzuki@yahoogroups.com writes:
                 
                having all the bolts helps to prevent warping of the cover.
                to remove the broken studs:  soak each stud with KANO BRAND AEROKROIL penetrating oil.  this stuff will soak its way out of a spray can.  can you grab the studs with a vice grip?  soak the studs for a day or two.  hit the broken stud on the end with a small hammer-you are not driving the screw, just making it ring with the vibration.  this helps the oil get into the thread.  sometimes, heating the screw with a big soldering gun helps.  sometimes a srewdriver slot can be cut into the screw shank with a dremel cutoff wheel or hacksaw blade.  clean the vacated thread with a tap of the right size before re-assembly (maybe even cleaning all the threads?)< /div>
                if the screw must be drilled for removal, take it to a machine shop and have it removed professionally so that the threaded hole in the casting isn't further damaged.

                dan h.



                From: "rmikey1such@... [mysuzuki]" <mysuzuki@yahoogroups.com>
                To: mysuzuki@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Sunday, May 14, 2017 10:53 AM
                Subject: [mysuzuki] GS!000G

                 
                I took off the valve cover on my GS to check the valve clearance.  There were two broken studs in the cover.  The inside #1 intake screw and the inside #2 exhaust.  My question is there are 16 total studs calling for 6.5 lb. ft./0.9kg-m.  Since this is not really a pressurized area of the engine, with a new gasket can I get buy with just 14 bolts if I can't get the two broken ones out?
                 
                                                        Mikey in Wisconsin 




              • Dan hatfield
                you can also use helicoils to replace the original threads with stainless steel inserts  and then never have a corrosion problem again.
                Message 7 of 7 , May 15, 2017
                  you can also use helicoils to replace the original threads with stainless steel inserts  and then never have a corrosion problem again.





                  From: "rmikey1such@... [mysuzuki]" <mysuzuki@yahoogroups.com>
                  To: mysuzuki@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Monday, May 15, 2017 8:54 AM
                  Subject: Re: [mysuzuki] GS!000G

                   
                  Dan,
                   
                      While taking out the other 14 bolts, I became quite aware that the valves might never have been checked.  Maybe 6 of them came out with little trouble.  The rest were tough to come out.  They were full of crud.  One of the things I learned from being a Journeyman Industrial Electrician for 38 years is there can always be a plan "B" and "C".  I will check out the aerokroil.  One thing I'm aware of is the size of the hole. If I wanted to, I could run a 1/4 20 (inch) tap into each hole without pre drilling and go to stainless bolts (had to do it on my GS850G.  Worked fine).  The stock bolts are soft enough that I could grind the broken ones flush with the head and drill those two out. 
                   
                      I'm going to beat this one with your help.
                   
                                                                                  Mikey
                   
                  In a message dated 5/15/2017 9:46:47 A.M. Central Daylight Time, mysuzuki@yahoogroups.com writes:
                   
                  i have been doing this kind of work since 1980 while working for a public utility power plant located on the ocean beach.  i have tested with a torque wrench dozens of penetrating oils against rust and corrosion seized bolts and studs from size 4 up to steam turbine casing bolts of 3 inch diameter.  i have found that the aerokroil far and away works better than anything except an mixture of acetone and dexron atf which was a near second.  
                  usually stud removal should only take a short time and isn't extremely expensive unless done by Electrical discharge machining (EDM).  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electrical_discharge_machining#Small_hole_drilling

                  when you add this technique to kroil it becomes fairly easy but still doesn't compare to edm for speed or effiiency.

                  dan

                  [Unable to display image]






                  From: "rmikey1such@... [mysuzuki]" <mysuzuki@yahoogroups.com>
                  To: mysuzuki@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Monday, May 15, 2017 5:41 AM
                  Subject: Re: [mysuzuki] GS!000G

                   
                  Dan,
                   
                      I've been spraying the two broken studs with PT Blaster recommended by my Son who repairs jet skis.  There may be enough room to try and flatten the top of the broken studs. I will try that and then try and loosen the studs with a small vise grips.  As a last resort, I'm thinking about the possibility of maybe looking for a couple of small C clamps and clamp it down from the outside (won't look pretty).  Taking it to a machine shop might be cost prohibitive.  Maybe I'll just start looking for another top end or another engine.
                   
                      Thanks for getting me to do a little thinking.  This GS is almost pristine with only 31K on it and I have a lot of spare parts (sans engine).  Since I already have a running Cavalcade, time is on my side.
                   
                                                                  Mikey
                   
                  In a message dated 5/15/2017 12:21:03 A.M. Central Daylight Time, mysuzuki@yahoogroups.com writes:
                   
                  having all the bolts helps to prevent warping of the cover.
                  to remove the broken studs:  soak each stud with KANO BRAND AEROKROIL penetrating oil.  this stuff will soak its way out of a spray can.  can you grab the studs with a vice grip?  soak the studs for a day or two.  hit the broken stud on the end with a small hammer-you are not driving the screw, just making it ring with the vibration.  this helps the oil get into the thread.  sometimes, heating the screw with a big soldering gun helps.  sometimes a srewdriver slot can be cut into the screw shank with a dremel cutoff wheel or hacksaw blade.  clean the vacated thread with a tap of the right size before re-assembly (maybe even cleaning all the threads?)< /div>
                  if the screw must be drilled for removal, take it to a machine shop and have it removed professionally so that the threaded hole in the casting isn't further damaged.

                  dan h.



                  From: "rmikey1such@... [mysuzuki]" <mysuzuki@yahoogroups.com>
                  To: mysuzuki@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Sunday, May 14, 2017 10:53 AM
                  Subject: [mysuzuki] GS!000G

                   
                  I took off the valve cover on my GS to check the valve clearance.  There were two broken studs in the cover.  The inside #1 intake screw and the inside #2 exhaust.  My question is there are 16 total studs calling for 6.5 lb. ft./0.9kg-m.  Since this is not really a pressurized area of the engine, with a new gasket can I get buy with just 14 bolts if I can't get the two broken ones out?
                   
                                                          Mikey in Wisconsin 






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