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Re: Melting lead tire weights for casting

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  • a1g2r3i
    Hints? - - Don t breath the fumes when melting lead. Outside is best. Also attach stove-pipe-wire to ferrus parts. dennis mac
    Message 1 of 13 , Jul 6 7:46 PM
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      Hints? - - Don't breath the fumes when melting lead. Outside is best. Also attach stove-pipe-wire to ferrus parts.
      dennis mac

      --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, Nick Andrews <nickjandrews@...> wrote:
      >
      > Alrighty then, I know it's late after the 4th now, but I was able to buy
      > about 250lbs of tire weights on Friday for $30. Now I want to melt them
      > down to cast some crushing media for a ball mill to make airfloat charcoal
      > and mill other things to a fine dust. And also to cast bullets. I bought
      > some muffin tins to use as ingot molds. It is my understanidng that tire
      > weights are supposedly 4-5% antimony to harden the weights a bit, which is
      > good for ball milling media and bullets.
      >
      > Any hints or tricks for the first melt to get rid of the steel clips and any
      > rust/contamination in the melt? Do you guys use any flux of any kind for
      > lead? Thanks.
      >
      > --
      > Nick A
      >
      > "You know what I wish? I wish that all the scum of the world had but a
      > single throat, and I had my hands about it..." Rorschach, 1975
      >
      > "They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety
      > deserve neither liberty nor safety."- Benjamin Franklin, Historical Review
      > of Pennsylvania, 1759
      >
      > "Suburbia is where the developer bulldozes out the trees, then names the
      > streets after them." Bill Vaughan
      >
      > "The price of apathy towards public affairs is to be ruled by evil men."
      > Plato
      >
    • ToolRoomTrustee@aol.com
      I have cast bullets from wheelweights for over 40 years. I have used electric hotplates and Coleman gas stoves with 10 pound pots to melt lead, I have also
      Message 2 of 13 , Jul 6 7:56 PM
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        I have cast bullets from wheelweights for over 40 years.
        I have used electric hotplates and Coleman gas stoves with 10 pound pots to melt lead, I have
        also used Lyman and Lee electric driven pots. For melting large quantities of wheelweights I got
        one of those propane fueled turkey deep fat frying stoves which I use with a six or eight quart
        cast iron pot from Harbor Freight. The Harbor Freight pots are often sold as "Dutch Ovens".
        I occasionally check the second hand stores for kitchen cooking spoons with slots, they are useful
        for taking the wheelweight clips out of the melt.

        If your wheelweights are damp when you put them in a cool pot and apply heat, the water will usually evaporate
        as the lead heats up although it is a good idea to stir the wheelweights around as they heat up so no water
        escapes vaporization. Once the lead is molten be very careful not to perspire into the pot or put damp wheelweights
        in it. Usually the one time you forget this will provide enough inspiration to never make that mistake again.

        I usually cast the wheelweights from the big pots into ingots. I have one pound ingot moulds from Lyman
        that have spaces for four ingots. I too have used muffin tins, cast iron muffin tins and the ones that are shaped like
        ears of corn for making cornbread. I also use aluminum pop cans with top cut off, they work well enough in the
        Lee lead pots, for those ingots I tear the aluminum can off when the can has cooled. I try to store my lead ingots
        in those 30 and 50 caliber ammo cans, I buy those at gun shows.

        Lead is getting harder to get, get it when you can. It's worthwhile checking some of the cast bullet sites to see
        information on which wheelweights have zinc in them as zinc will ruin a lead alloy for bullet casting although it
        may still be used as fishing weights and boat keels. Good wheelweight ingots suitable for bullet casting can be traded
        for bad lead if you aren't casting bullets.

        HTH
        Larry Murray
      • Nick Andrews
        1/2 for the pint and quart jars and 3/4 cylinders for the 1 gallon jars. Using plans from Sponenburgh s book Ball Milling Theory and Practice For The Amateur
        Message 3 of 13 , Jul 6 9:30 PM
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          1/2" for the pint and quart jars and 3/4 cylinders for the 1 gallon jars.  Using plans from Sponenburgh's book 'Ball Milling Theory and Practice For The Amateur Pyrotechnician.'  I would never consider using the pot and spoons for food ever again!  I looked at HF today for a pot, thought the dutch oven was too big.  Since that's all they had besides frying pans, I may reconsider.  I am going to check the thrift-junk stores around town first.  A friend has the Lyman or similar melt pot for bullets, as well as the real molds for them.  He casts bullets all the time for the AR and .45 and more.

          On Mon, Jul 6, 2009 at 8:25 PM, egbjr <EGBJR@...> wrote:


          Also consider all the lead dust you will create if you use lead balls in a ball mill.  Even water hardened lead is still fairly soft.  What size balls are you looking for?
          Ed
           
           
           
          In a message dated 07/06/09 20:44:37 Eastern Daylight Time, acalver@... writes:
          You are heading for trouble.
          Lead when heated or melted will deposit particles around the local area. Lead is a poison, causes cancer, ect. It is a bad thing to ingest. It will accumulates in the body.
          Melt lead outside. Do not inhale the fumes (use a dust mask, and stay upwind anyway.) Do not smoke, drink or eat while casting. Wash your hands often - it will get contaminated. Actually, all the implements you use for casting will get contaminated. Wash well when you are finished - your clothes also.
          Do not use all these melting implements for any other uses like cooking food, as once it is contaminated, it will in turn contaminate the food later on. This includes the heat source. Cleaning the pot, ladle and heat source will never be 100% - so do not use for cooking.)

          Lead poisoning is not a joke. Trace amounts do build up over time.
          ( For instance,if you use a camp fire to melt, use a different fire at least 10 feet away to cook on at a later time.) Or you could use a melting pot made for the purpose by the companies that make reloading equipment - at least check their safety information. Google a search for bullet reloading equipment, follow the different company links, and download the safety instructions. It is all applicable.)

          Stay healthy and do things safely. Any machine will not do you much good if you are too sick to use it.

          Alfred


          --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, "crgintx" <crgintx@...> wrote:
          >
          > I would use round cake mould for anything not immediately used. Maybe a bunt cake mould for a convenient handle.   Lead oxides fairly quickly and you want to minimize surface area while not getting overly heavy.  For bullet casting, I flux with Drano.  HTH
          >
          > Carlos in ATx
          >
          >
          > --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, Nick Andrews <nickjandrews@> wrote:
          > >
          > > Alrighty then, I know it's late after the 4th now, but I was able to buy
          > > about 250lbs oftire weights on Friday for $30.  Now I want to melt them
          > > down to cast some crushing media for a ball mill to make airfloat charcoal
          > > and mill other things to a fine dust.  And also to cast bullets.  I bought
          > > some muffin tins to use as ingot molds.  It is my understanidng that tire
          > > weights are supposedly 4-5% antimony to harden the weights a bit, which is
          > > good for ball milling media and bullets.
          > >
          > > Any hints or tricks for the first melt to get rid of the steel clips and any
          > > rust/contamination in the melt?  Do you guys use any flux of any kind for
          > > lead?  Thanks.
          > >
          > > --
          > > Nick A
          > >
          > > "You know what I wish?  I wish that all the scum of the world had but a
          > > single throat, and I had my hands about it..."  Rorschach, 1975
          > >
          > > "They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety
          > > deserve neither liberty nor safety."- Benjamin Franklin, Historical Review
          > > of Pennsylvania, 1759
          > >
          > > "Suburbia is where the developer bulldozes out the trees, then names the
          > > streets after them." Bill Vaughan
          > >
          > > "The price of apathy towards public affairs is to be ruled by evil men."
          > > Plato
          > >
          >




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          --
          Nick A

          "You know what I wish?  I wish that all the scum of the world had but a single throat, and I had my hands about it..."  Rorschach, 1975

          "They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety."- Benjamin Franklin, Historical Review of Pennsylvania, 1759

          "Suburbia is where the developer bulldozes out the trees, then names the streets after them." Bill Vaughan

          "The price of apathy towards public affairs is to be ruled by evil men." Plato
        • crgintx
          I should have said old cake pans used for lead casting only. I was a HAZMAT trainer in the military. Lead is no where near as dangerous as mercury or
          Message 4 of 13 , Jul 8 9:54 AM
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            I should have said old cake pans used for lead casting only. I was a HAZMAT trainer in the military. Lead is no where near as dangerous as mercury or arsenic. As long as casting is done outside, you'll be fine. The number one killer chemical in the world is still carbon monoxide follow very closely by cyanide. You're correct about limiting exposure but unless you're constantly working with it, it nowhere near as dangerous as the hundreds(thousands) of other chemicals that modern humans are exposed to on a daily basis which while alone may not be harmful but when combined with other chemicals in the body maybe become very harmful.

            You shouldn't use a wood or gas flame to melt lead ideally. You should spend the $50 to buy an electric lead melting stove. Using lead thermometer also will help because overheating lead will create lead oxide vapors.

            I've been casting bullets for over 25 years, it hasn't affected me yet but then the voices keep telling me to stay home and clean my guns.

            Carlos in ATx

            --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, "alfie08" <acalver@...> wrote:
            >
            > You are heading for trouble.
            > Lead when heated or melted will deposit particles around the local area. Lead is a poison, causes cancer, ect. It is a bad thing to ingest. It will accumulates in the body.
            > Melt lead outside. Do not inhale the fumes (use a dust mask, and stay upwind anyway.) Do not smoke, drink or eat while casting. Wash your hands often - it will get contaminated. Actually, all the implements you use for casting will get contaminated. Wash well when you are finished - your clothes also.
            > Do not use all these melting implements for any other uses like cooking food, as once it is contaminated, it will in turn contaminate the food later on. This includes the heat source. Cleaning the pot, ladle and heat source will never be 100% - so do not use for cooking.)
            >
            > Lead poisoning is not a joke. Trace amounts do build up over time.
            > ( For instance,if you use a camp fire to melt, use a different fire at least 10 feet away to cook on at a later time.) Or you could use a melting pot made for the purpose by the companies that make reloading equipment - at least check their safety information. Google a search for bullet reloading equipment, follow the different company links, and download the safety instructions. It is all applicable.)
            >
            > Stay healthy and do things safely. Any machine will not do you much good if you are too sick to use it.
            >
            > Alfred
            >
            >
            > --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, "crgintx" <crgintx@> wrote:
            > >
            > > I would use round cake mould for anything not immediately used. Maybe a bunt cake mould for a convenient handle. Lead oxides fairly quickly and you want to minimize surface area while not getting overly heavy. For bullet casting, I flux with Drano. HTH
            > >
            > > Carlos in ATx
            > >
            > >
            > > --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, Nick Andrews <nickjandrews@> wrote:
            > > >
            > > > Alrighty then, I know it's late after the 4th now, but I was able to buy
            > > > about 250lbs of tire weights on Friday for $30. Now I want to melt them
            > > > down to cast some crushing media for a ball mill to make airfloat charcoal
            > > > and mill other things to a fine dust. And also to cast bullets. I bought
            > > > some muffin tins to use as ingot molds. It is my understanidng that tire
            > > > weights are supposedly 4-5% antimony to harden the weights a bit, which is
            > > > good for ball milling media and bullets.
            > > >
            > > > Any hints or tricks for the first melt to get rid of the steel clips and any
            > > > rust/contamination in the melt? Do you guys use any flux of any kind for
            > > > lead? Thanks.
            > > >
            > > > --
            > > > Nick A
            > > >
            > > > "You know what I wish? I wish that all the scum of the world had but a
            > > > single throat, and I had my hands about it..." Rorschach, 1975
            > > >
            > > > "They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety
            > > > deserve neither liberty nor safety."- Benjamin Franklin, Historical Review
            > > > of Pennsylvania, 1759
            > > >
            > > > "Suburbia is where the developer bulldozes out the trees, then names the
            > > > streets after them." Bill Vaughan
            > > >
            > > > "The price of apathy towards public affairs is to be ruled by evil men."
            > > > Plato
            > > >
            > >
            >
          • Nick Andrews
            I did a quick look at my three buckets last night, and found a number of weights that have square ends, but all are molded onto the clips, none are riveted
            Message 5 of 13 , Jul 9 7:13 AM
            • 0 Attachment
              I did a quick look at my three buckets last night, and found a number of weights that have square ends, but all are molded onto the clips, none are riveted like is shown on the 1911.org posting.  Did not do any real tests, but they seem soft.  Zinc is pretty soft metal, not quite as much as lead.  I guess I need to do the acid test on them...

              On Wed, Jul 8, 2009 at 10:54 AM, crgintx <crgintx@...> wrote:


              I should have said old cake pans used for lead casting only. I was a HAZMAT trainer in the military. Lead is no where near as dangerous as mercury or arsenic. As long as casting is done outside, you'll be fine. The number one killer chemical in the world is still carbon monoxide follow very closely by cyanide. You're correct about limiting exposure but unless you're constantly working with it, it nowhere near as dangerous as the hundreds(thousands) of other chemicals that modern humans are exposed to on a daily basis which while alone may not be harmful but when combined with other chemicals in the body maybe become very harmful.

              You shouldn't use a wood or gas flame to melt lead ideally. You should spend the $50 to buy an electric lead melting stove. Using lead thermometer also will help because overheating lead will create lead oxide vapors.

              I've been casting bullets for over 25 years, it hasn't affected me yet but then the voices keep telling me to stay home and clean my guns.

              Carlos in ATx



              --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, "alfie08" <acalver@...> wrote:
              >
              > You are heading for trouble.
              > Lead when heated or melted will deposit particles around the local area. Lead is a poison, causes cancer, ect. It is a bad thing to ingest. It will accumulates in the body.
              > Melt lead outside. Do not inhale the fumes (use a dust mask, and stay upwind anyway.) Do not smoke, drink or eat while casting. Wash your hands often - it will get contaminated. Actually, all the implements you use for casting will get contaminated. Wash well when you are finished - your clothes also.
              > Do not use all these melting implements for any other uses like cooking food, as once it is contaminated, it will in turn contaminate the food later on. This includes the heat source. Cleaning the pot, ladle and heat source will never be 100% - so do not use for cooking.)
              >
              > Lead poisoning is not a joke. Trace amounts do build up over time.
              > ( For instance,if you use a camp fire to melt, use a different fire at least 10 feet away to cook on at a later time.) Or you could use a melting pot made for the purpose by the companies that make reloading equipment - at least check their safety information. Google a search for bullet reloading equipment, follow the different company links, and download the safety instructions. It is all applicable.)
              >
              > Stay healthy and do things safely. Any machine will not do you much good if you are too sick to use it.
              >
              > Alfred
              >
              >
              > --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, "crgintx" <crgintx@> wrote:
              > >
              > > I would use round cake mould for anything not immediately used. Maybe a bunt cake mould for a convenient handle. Lead oxides fairly quickly and you want to minimize surface area while not getting overly heavy. For bullet casting, I flux with Drano. HTH
              > >
              > > Carlos in ATx
              > >
              > >
              > > --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, Nick Andrews <nickjandrews@> wrote:
              > > >
              > > > Alrighty then, I know it's late after the 4th now, but I was able to buy
              > > > about 250lbs of tire weights on Friday for $30. Now I want to melt them
              > > > down to cast some crushing media for a ball mill to make airfloat charcoal
              > > > and mill other things to a fine dust. And also to cast bullets. I bought
              > > > some muffin tins to use as ingot molds. It is my understanidng that tire
              > > > weights are supposedly 4-5% antimony to harden the weights a bit, which is
              > > > good for ball milling media and bullets.
              > > >
              > > > Any hints or tricks for the first melt to get rid of the steel clips and any
              > > > rust/contamination in the melt? Do you guys use any flux of any kind for
              > > > lead? Thanks.
              > > >
              > > > --
              > > > Nick A
              > > >
              > > > "You know what I wish? I wish that all the scum of the world had but a
              > > > single throat, and I had my hands about it..." Rorschach, 1975
              > > >
              > > > "They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety
              > > > deserve neither liberty nor safety."- Benjamin Franklin, Historical Review
              > > > of Pennsylvania, 1759
              > > >
              > > > "Suburbia is where the developer bulldozes out the trees, then names the
              > > > streets after them." Bill Vaughan
              > > >
              > > > "The price of apathy towards public affairs is to be ruled by evil men."
              > > > Plato
              > > >
              > >
              >




              --
              Nick A

              "You know what I wish?  I wish that all the scum of the world had but a single throat, and I had my hands about it..."  Rorschach, 1975

              "They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety."- Benjamin Franklin, Historical Review of Pennsylvania, 1759

              "Suburbia is where the developer bulldozes out the trees, then names the streets after them." Bill Vaughan

              "The price of apathy towards public affairs is to be ruled by evil men." Plato
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