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Re: Microwave welder

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  • a1g2r3i
    Thankyou Eric for sharing. The wise will keep it in mind. dennis mac
    Message 1 of 10 , Jun 30, 2009
      Thankyou Eric for sharing. The wise will keep it in mind.
      dennis mac

      --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, "Eric Smith" <white_knight_411@...> wrote:
      >
      > http://www.instructables.com/id/Build-a-Microwave-Transformer-Homemade-Welder/
      >
      >
      > Just remember, this can and WILL kill you if constructed/used improperly. DEATH, not injury. can't stress it enough.
      >
      > And since you don't know how many turns you need.... I can safely say, you need to do some more reading. Determining the # of turns for your secondary is SIMPLE electrical theory.
      >
      > NO welding machine, and even less so a homemade one, is made for those not educated and trained in their use....
      >
      > okok, so a chimp with sunglasses could stick stuff together with a properly preset GMAW setup.
      >
      > Sorry bout the rant. This one always touches a personal note for me. I personally KNEW 2 fellas(Working as "professional welders") that are no longer because they didn't know what they were doing while welding. I know a woman with seriously compromised vision from poor safety techniques... and I have myself suffered flash blindness once or twice cause some "stud" thought he knew how to weld.
      > Even highly trained, very careful welders are at some risk.
      > Two fellas in the AWS, both of whom I would trust to weld my zipper shut with me in the pants, if they asked... Both of them have been burned, or flashed over the 50+ collective years they have been welding, and teaching.
      >
      > Can you tell I'm a bit of a safety freak when it comes to electricity?
      >
      > I once woke up upside-down on a ladder because my partner removed my lockout lock, and threw a breaker.... while I was holding the live and neutral wires of an overhead fixture. Lessons learned the hard way. Now, I practice the art of welding with one hand behind my back.
      >
      > SNIP
    • David LeVine
      ... Just from a little experience, you want at least 20 VAC open circuit on a stick welder with 25-30 VAC being good. A reactor in series is a definite plus,
      Message 2 of 10 , Jul 20, 2009
        Pat Delany wrote:
        >
        >
        > I hope people will mount this in something like an old computer box
        > and then ground the hell out of it! Personally I think that the parts
        > needed to stabilize the arc are more expensive than a welder on Craigs
        > list.
        >
        > Pat

        Just from a little experience, you want at least 20 VAC open circuit on
        a stick welder with 25-30 VAC being good. A reactor in series is a
        definite plus, it allows a lower voltage welder to perform better.

        For a stick welder, you will need 2-5 KW, Microwave transformers run 600
        Watts each and up, often in the 1KW range. Figure three or more.

        Small welders often run 21-24 Volts and limit at 100 Amperes, this is
        marginal for most good work! Better would be 150 Amperes and 45-50
        Volts, but that is 7.5 KW and very hard for most homes to supply. At 24
        Volts it is a more reasonable 3.5-4 KW

        --
        David G. LeVine
        Nashua, NH 03060
      • Pierre Coueffin
        My stove is plugged into a 50 Amp 220Volt line. My calculations say that I could pull 11KW out of that without blowing the breaker. My dryer has a similar
        Message 3 of 10 , Jul 20, 2009
          My stove is plugged into a 50 Amp 220Volt line. My calculations say
          that I could pull 11KW out of that without blowing the breaker. My
          dryer has a similar setup... When I lived in a house with an electric
          water heater, there was yet another high-current 220 line there...
          I've been known to unplug one of these devices in the past in order to
          run an (thick!) extension cord out a handy window and plug in a welder
          close to the location where it is needed. Taking 220V down into the
          50V range is only a 4 or 5 to 1 reduction, and assuming that you use
          heavy enough wire should give you ample current... It would be
          relatively straightforward to switch off the breaker that normally
          services any of these appliances and add an outlet near the service
          panel to provide power to the welder. You would only be able to weld
          when not doing your laundry, but any electrician could set it up for
          you.

          On Mon, Jul 20, 2009 at 11:47 AM, David
          LeVine<dlevine144@...> wrote:
          > Better would be 150 Amperes and 45-50
          > Volts, but that is 7.5 KW and very hard for most homes to supply.
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