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Re: Center finder

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  • Eric Smith
    If all you want is to make the points for drilling(say to turn between centers) of rough stock... that design would work fine. I suppose. A good, quality,
    Message 1 of 3 , Jun 1 1:04 AM
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      If all you want is to make the points for drilling(say to turn between centers) of rough stock... that design would work fine. I suppose.
      A good, quality, accurate, all-steel(or steel/cast-iron) combination square would serve MUCH better, and be WELL worth the investment.

      If made of good quality and taken care of, they last several lifetimes. I have a few sets, but my "every-day"...I am the 4th generation of machinist to have custody of. That I know of. The set MAY be older than that, I dunno, as it's not dated.

      I'm not saying you need to spend $200 on a good Starrett set, but if you CAN(or can find them second hand) you SHOULD. That one investment in accuracy will pay off for the remainder of your machining days, and years beyond that probably also.

      --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, "hepps_29646" <hepps_29646@...> wrote:
      >
      > I happened across this Instructable for a center finder. I haven't read the entire article but, the first picture seems to be pretty self-explanatory.
      > It looks to be made for wood work but might be close enough for a metal lathe and the price is right.
      > http://www.instructables.com/id/Make-a-Center-Finder/
      >
      > Harold
      >
    • keith gutshall
      Hello Eric A center finder is a most useful tool for around the shop.  It works good for round stock to find the center.  I use it on square stock also.  It
      Message 2 of 3 , Jun 1 10:08 AM
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        Hello Eric
        A center finder is a most useful tool for around the shop.
         It works good for round stock to find the center.
         I use it on square stock also.
         It is a very handy layout tool.
         The imported ones are not that expensive to buy.
         
         Keith
         
         

        Deep Run Portage
        Back Shop
        " The Lizard Works"

        --- On Mon, 6/1/09, Eric Smith <white_knight_411@...> wrote:

        From: Eric Smith <white_knight_411@...>
        Subject: [multimachine] Re: Center finder
        To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Monday, June 1, 2009, 3:04 AM

        If all you want is to make the points for drilling(say to turn between centers) of rough stock... that design would work fine. I suppose.
        A good, quality, accurate, all-steel(or steel/cast-iron) combination square would serve MUCH better, and be WELL worth the investment.

        If made of good quality and taken care of, they last several lifetimes. I have a few sets, but my "every-day". ..I am the 4th generation of machinist to have custody of. That I know of. The set MAY be older than that, I dunno, as it's not dated.

        I'm not saying you need to spend $200 on a good Starrett set, but if you CAN(or can find them second hand) you SHOULD. That one investment in accuracy will pay off for the remainder of your machining days, and years beyond that probably also.

        --- In multimachine@ yahoogroups. com, "hepps_29646" <hepps_29646@ ...> wrote:
        >
        > I happened across this Instructable for a center finder. I haven't read the entire article but, the first picture seems to be pretty self-explanatory.
        > It looks to be made for wood work but might be close enough for a metal lathe and the price is right.
        > http://www.instruct ables.com/ id/Make-a- Center-Finder/
        >
        > Harold
        >


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