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Re: Spindle drawings badly needed

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  • Pat Delany
    ENCO has these MT straight MT sockets. I just can t make an accurate internal taper so I simply softened the rear of the socket and drilled a big hole in the
    Message 1 of 9 , Nov 1, 2008
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      ENCO has these MT straight MT sockets. I just can't make an accurate
      internal taper so I simply softened the rear of the socket and drilled
      a big hole in the back for a draw bar and then pressed the socket in.
      Sorta crude but a foot long test bar ran out just .003" at the end!

      Pat
      --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, Pat Delany <rigmatch@...> wrote:
      >
      > Hi Keith
      > I bored a 1.75" hole and used a Morse 3 solid socket.
      >
      > Pat
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > ________________________________
      > From: keith gutshall <drpshops@...>
      > To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com
      > Sent: Wednesday, October 29, 2008 6:46:18 PM
      > Subject: Re: [multimachine] Spindle drawings badly needed
      >
      >
      > Hello Pat
      > I am just going to think out loud for spell.
      >
      > Spindles are the main problem for the machine building groups I am
      in,whether metal work or wood working group.
      > Finding or makeing a good spindle seem to be the hardest part of
      the machine. If one can get this part, the rest of the machine seem to
      fall into place.
      >
      > I have made some spindles and this to me seem the hardest part.
      >
      > Bearings and bushings seem to control the size of the shaft.On a
      metal lathe/machine you want the largest heaviest shaft you can get.
      The stiffer spindle seems to work better than a flimsy one.Of course
      the supports for the bearing must be heavy enought to hold the spindle.
      >
      > If the size of the shaft gets large around 2 1/2 in , pulleys with
      that bore get hard to find and costly.
      >
      > Spindle are the thing we have had the biggest problem with, how to
      make them.
      > Pat, this is a tough question to deal with.
      >
      > What kind of taper do you put in the shaft, Morse taper, R-8, C5.?
      >
      > Keith
      >
      > Deep Run Portage
      > Back Shop
      > " The Lizard Works"
      >
      > --- On Wed, 10/29/08, Pat Delany <rigmatch@yahoo. com> wrote:
      >
      > From: Pat Delany <rigmatch@yahoo. com>
      > Subject: [multimachine] Spindle drawings badly needed
      > To: multimachine@ yahoogroups. com
      > Date: Wednesday, October 29, 2008, 3:08 PM
      >
      >
      > Newer members may not be aware of the different spindle configurations
      > that we have discussed in the past.
      >
      > Could someone help by drawing sketches of these:
      >
      > Pipe spindle turning in iron block (no bushings) and located by
      > thrust bearing (bushing) mounted on main bearing pads
      > Spindle lubricated by pipes through side of block. Oil fed by cups,
      > elevated can or power steering pump
      > (Need machinery handbook to determine max RPM for each type of
      > lubrication. ) (Rolls Royce worked this way for years)
      >
      > Spindle with extra bushing mounted on plate bolted to oil pan surfaces
      >
      > Spindle ends drilled and threaded like a "ring" (see How to build
      > book) type chuck
      >
      > Pipe spindle with ZA12 or 27 cast bushings in rebored cylinder
      >
      > Pipe spindle bushings in not re-bored block but one that has good
      > ridge at top of cylinder and good bore at very bottom of cylinder.
      > Front bushing is aligned with ridge, rear bushing with back end of
      > bore. Greased spindle holds bushings in place while epoxy sets. (What
      > other kinds of filler material could be injected through tubes in side
      > of block?)
      >
      > ALSO
      >
      > spindle with roller or ball bearings running directly in engine bore
      > (like current MMs)
      >
      > current MM spindle with forth bushing mounted to plate bolted to oil
      > pan surface
      >
      > current spindle with R8, C5 and MT adapters
      >
      > ball or roller bearings with conventional bearing housings like in
      > "engine mill"
      >
      > ALSO
      >
      > a thinner(high speed) ball bearing spindle that would fit inside a
      > larger one (Possibly powered by belt at front end of block)
      >
      > Pat
      >
    • David G. LeVine
      ... Pat, A point to remember, the socket, when removed, allows a workpiece just slightly smaller to pass through. With a fixed taper, the small end of the
      Message 2 of 9 , Nov 2, 2008
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        Pat Delany wrote:
        > ENCO has these MT straight MT sockets. I just can't make an accurate
        > internal taper so I simply softened the rear of the socket and drilled
        > a big hole in the back for a draw bar and then pressed the socket in.
        > Sorta crude but a foot long test bar ran out just .003" at the end!

        Pat,

        A point to remember, the socket, when removed, allows a workpiece just
        slightly smaller to pass through. With a fixed taper, the small end of
        the taper determines the maximum size...

        --
        David G. LeVine
        Nashua, NH 03060
      • Lance
        Pat, I couldn t find these on the ENCO site. Do you have a part #. Thanks lance ++++
        Message 3 of 9 , Nov 6, 2008
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          Pat,

          I couldn't find these on the ENCO site.
          Do you have a part #.
          Thanks

          lance
          ++++

          On Nov 1, 2008, at 12:37 PM, Pat Delany wrote:

          ENCO has these MT straight MT sockets. I just can't make an accurate
          internal taper so I simply softened the rear of the socket and drilled
          a big hole in the back for a draw bar and then pressed the socket in.
          Sorta crude but a foot long test bar ran out just .003" at the end!

          Pat
          --- In multimachine@ yahoogroups. com, Pat Delany <rigmatch@.. .> wrote:
          >
          > Hi Keith
          > I bored a 1.75" hole and used a Morse 3 solid socket.
          > 
          > Pat

           

        • Jeff
          top right of page 452 Enco online catalog p.n. 214-8715 Jeff
          Message 4 of 9 , Nov 6, 2008
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            top right of page 452 Enco online catalog
            p.n. 214-8715
            Jeff

            --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, Lance <gbof@...> wrote:
            >
            > Pat,
            >
            > I couldn't find these on the ENCO site.
            > Do you have a part #.
            > Thanks
            >
            > lance
            > ++++
            >
            > On Nov 1, 2008, at 12:37 PM, Pat Delany wrote:
            >
            > > ENCO has these MT straight MT sockets. I just can't make an accurate
            > > internal taper so I simply softened the rear of the socket and drilled
            > > a big hole in the back for a draw bar and then pressed the socket in.
            > > Sorta crude but a foot long test bar ran out just .003" at the end!
            > >
            > > Pat
            > > --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, Pat Delany <rigmatch@> wrote:
            > > >
            > > > Hi Keith
            > > > I bored a 1.75" hole and used a Morse 3 solid socket.
            > > >
            > > > Pat
            > >
            > >
            > >
            >
          • Pat Delany
            Thanks Jeff Kevin These things are really hard! I softened mine by heating the back end red and then wrapping it in insulation. It was still warm the next day
            Message 5 of 9 , Nov 6, 2008
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              Thanks Jeff

              Kevin
              These things are really hard! I softened mine by heating the back end
              red and then wrapping it in insulation. It was still warm the next day
              and was easily drilled and tapped for a drawbar. Be sure to grind a
              flat on the side for a set screw. Even though I pressed mine in it
              still spun a little and after a few removals needed a piece of .001"
              shim stock to make it tight. Accuracy was still good even after all my
              brutality

              Jeff
              How is your "new" lathe?

              Pat

              --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, "Jeff" <jhan5en@...> wrote:
              >
              > top right of page 452 Enco online catalog
              > p.n. 214-8715
              > Jeff
              >
              > --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, Lance <gbof@> wrote:
              > >
              > > Pat,
              > >
              > > I couldn't find these on the ENCO site.
              > > Do you have a part #.
              > > Thanks
              > >
              > > lance
              > > ++++
              > >
              > > On Nov 1, 2008, at 12:37 PM, Pat Delany wrote:
              > >
              > > > ENCO has these MT straight MT sockets. I just can't make an accurate
              > > > internal taper so I simply softened the rear of the socket and
              drilled
              > > > a big hole in the back for a draw bar and then pressed the
              socket in.
              > > > Sorta crude but a foot long test bar ran out just .003" at the end!
              > > >
              > > > Pat
              > > > --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, Pat Delany <rigmatch@> wrote:
              > > > >
              > > > > Hi Keith
              > > > > I bored a 1.75" hole and used a Morse 3 solid socket.
              > > > >
              > > > > Pat
              > > >
              > > >
              > > >
              > >
              >
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