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Re: A drill for Costas?

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  • a1g2r3i
    I M JUST WONDERING IF ANYONE HAS USED A TYpe of bolt that at the end opposite its head starts as a drill then it cuts a thread as a tap, then it has a bolt
    Message 1 of 9 , Feb 3, 2008
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      I M JUST WONDERING IF ANYONE HAS USED A TYpe of bolt that at the end
      opposite its head starts as a drill then it cuts a thread as a tap,
      then it has a bolt thread. I had the occation to help a chap use an
      impact (twist type) drill to put this type of bolts into 1/2 " plate.
      Sorry I do not know what they are called. At the very least, a couple
      of these could be used to hold a cole type drill to the plate needing a
      large hole.
      dennis mac

      --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, "Pat Delany" <rigmatch@...> wrote:
      >
      > Weld up a 300mm box out of 4 pieces of 50mm. square tubing. Get a
      > 300mm length of 25mm. allthread. Get a 12mm hole drilled down the
      > length of the allthread and weld a 6" handwheel on one end. Drill 1
      > side of the box 25mm and weld on a 25mm nut. Drill a 17mm hole on the
      > opposing (bottom} side, weld feet on bottom side and use a 12mm
      > spindle with chuck, thrust bushing and "T" handle or hex shape.
      >
      > Forget square threads.
      >
      > Does this make any sense?
      >
      > Pat
      >
    • cvlac
      Hi Dennis Yes, I too ,have see a tool like this one, I don t remember more where. They are special tools made from tool maker shops, that are not available
      Message 2 of 9 , Feb 4, 2008
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        Hi Dennis
        Yes, I too ,have see a tool like this one, I don't remember more
        where. They are special tools made from tool maker shops, that are not
        available anywhere .If it were possible to know the exact name of the
        tool, maybe it is possible to locate it with a google search.
        Costas

        --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, "a1g2r3i" <a1g2r3i@...> wrote:
        >
        > I M JUST WONDERING IF ANYONE HAS USED A TYpe of bolt that at the end
        > opposite its head starts as a drill then it cuts a thread as a tap,
        > then it has a bolt thread. I had the occation to help a chap use an
        > impact (twist type) drill to put this type of bolts into 1/2 " plate.
        > Sorry I do not know what they are called. At the very least, a couple
        > of these could be used to hold a cole type drill to the plate needing a
        > large hole.
        > dennis mac
        >
        > --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, "Pat Delany" <rigmatch@> wrote:
        > >
        > > Weld up a 300mm box out of 4 pieces of 50mm. square tubing. Get a
        > > 300mm length of 25mm. allthread. Get a 12mm hole drilled down the
        > > length of the allthread and weld a 6" handwheel on one end. Drill 1
        > > side of the box 25mm and weld on a 25mm nut. Drill a 17mm hole on the
        > > opposing (bottom} side, weld feet on bottom side and use a 12mm
        > > spindle with chuck, thrust bushing and "T" handle or hex shape.
        > >
        > > Forget square threads.
        > >
        > > Does this make any sense?
        > >
        > > Pat
        > >
        >
      • David LeVine
        ... They are called Self-Drilling/Tek Screws and examples can be found at http://www.fastenal.com/content/product_specifications/SDS.HW.Z.pdf -- David G.
        Message 3 of 9 , Feb 4, 2008
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          a1g2r3i wrote:
          > I M JUST WONDERING IF ANYONE HAS USED A TYpe of bolt that at the end
          > opposite its head starts as a drill then it cuts a thread as a tap,
          > then it has a bolt thread. I had the occation to help a chap use an
          > impact (twist type) drill to put this type of bolts into 1/2 " plate.
          > Sorry I do not know what they are called. At the very least, a couple
          > of these could be used to hold a cole type drill to the plate needing a
          > large hole.
          > dennis mac
          >

          They are called "Self-Drilling/Tek Screws" and examples can be found at
          http://www.fastenal.com/content/product_specifications/SDS.HW.Z.pdf

          --
          David G. LeVine
          Nashua, NH 03060
        • robert frazier
          i be leave you re talking about self tapping crews also called self drilling screws. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Self-tapping if so you can buy them at any
          Message 4 of 9 , Feb 4, 2008
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            i be leave you're talking about self tapping crews also called self drilling screws.
            http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Self-tapping
            if so you can buy them at any hardware store by the box. if your using them on anything thicker then sheet metal you'll need to pre drill a hole.

            cvlac <cvlac0@...> wrote:
            Hi Dennis
            Yes, I too ,have see a tool like this one, I don't remember more
            where. They are special tools made from tool maker shops, that are not
            available anywhere .If it were possible to know the exact name of the
            tool, maybe it is possible to locate it with a google search.
            Costas

            --- In multimachine@ yahoogroups. com, "a1g2r3i" <a1g2r3i@... > wrote:
            >
            > I M JUST WONDERING IF ANYONE HAS USED A TYpe of bolt that at the end
            > opposite its head starts as a drill then it cuts a thread as a tap,
            > then it has a bolt thread. I had the occation to help a chap use an
            > impact (twist type) drill to put this type of bolts into 1/2 " plate.
            > Sorry I do not know what they are called. At the very least, a couple
            > of these could be used to hold a cole type drill to the plate needing a
            > large hole.
            > dennis mac
            >
            > --- In multimachine@ yahoogroups. com, "Pat Delany" <rigmatch@> wrote:
            > >
            > > Weld up a 300mm box out of 4 pieces of 50mm. square tubing. Get a
            > > 300mm length of 25mm. allthread. Get a 12mm hole drilled down the
            > > length of the allthread and weld a 6" handwheel on one end. Drill 1
            > > side of the box 25mm and weld on a 25mm nut. Drill a 17mm hole on the
            > > opposing (bottom} side, weld feet on bottom side and use a 12mm
            > > spindle with chuck, thrust bushing and "T" handle or hex shape.
            > >
            > > Forget square threads.
            > >
            > > Does this make any sense?
            > >
            > > Pat
            > >
            >





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          • Donald H Locker
            I just uploaded a pdf of my interpretation of Pat s words. I don t show the handwheel or the 17mm hole in the bottom piece, the feet or the chuck. HTH,
            Message 5 of 9 , Feb 11, 2008
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              I just uploaded a pdf of my interpretation of Pat's words. I don't show the
              handwheel or the 17mm hole in the bottom piece, the feet or the chuck.

              HTH,
              Donald.

              cvlac wrote:
              > Maybe Jeff or Keith can make a drawing of these propositions because
              > a picture counts like thousand words specialy for them that have not
              > english as mother language?
              > Thanx Costas
              >
              > --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, "Pat Delany" <rigmatch@...>
              > wrote:
              >> Weld up a 300mm box out of 4 pieces of 50mm. square tubing. Get a
              >> 300mm length of 25mm. allthread. Get a 12mm hole drilled down the
              >> length of the allthread and weld a 6" handwheel on one end. Drill 1
              >> side of the box 25mm and weld on a 25mm nut. Drill a 17mm hole on
              > the
              >> opposing (bottom} side, weld feet on bottom side and use a 12mm
              >> spindle with chuck, thrust bushing and "T" handle or hex shape.
              >>
              >> Forget square threads.
              >>
              >> Does this make any sense?
              >>
              >> Pat
              >>
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