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Starter Motor - was - Steam power

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  • twofouroh
    !!Guys, this isn t going to work!! Starter motors are NOT designed for continuous duty, and converting one would be far more expensive than buying a comparable
    Message 1 of 1 , Jul 1 12:08 PM
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      !!Guys, this isn't going to work!!
      Starter motors are NOT designed for continuous duty, and
      converting one would be far more expensive than buying a comparable
      continuous duty motor. I understand this is part of the "trying to
      use the whole car" thing, but by the time you derate the starter to
      the point that it doesn't catch fire, you don't have much (any) power
      left. Starter motors were designed for very high torque, and small
      size. The engineers didn't care at all about the huge amounts of heat
      that are generated, because a starter motor only runs for a few
      seconds at a time, and will usually drain a battery before it
      overheats (usually only takes about a minute). What kind of work
      could be done in a minute? Where would 3rd world people get more
      batteries? At these discharge rates, normal car batteries won't last
      very long. Also, even if you somehow fit a massive heat sink and
      'infinity' battery to the motor, they weren't designed for a long
      life. A starter motor uses brushes, and they wear out somewhere
      between 100-150K miles in a normally driven car. If you figure you
      get 20 mi. avg. per start, that's 7.5K 2 sec. starts before the
      brushes are gone. We're talking a little over 4 hours on that one, if
      you start with a new set of brushes . . . not likely. A 3rd world
      junker starter would have a brush life measured in minutes. Lastly,
      they weren't designed to ever be oiled. I just don't think this is
      do-able in America, much less the 3rd world.
      Sorry for the long post, I usually just lurk since I'm not a
      machinist, but this is something I know about since I am a pretty
      serious car mechanic / electronics guy.

      Scott B.
      2 posts and counting


      --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, "David G. LeVine" <dlevine@...>
      wrote:
      >
      > At 11:37 AM 6/30/2007, you wrote:
      > >I am talking with respect to older starters which I have hands on
      knowledge
      > >of, Chevy, Dodge, Ford. one of these have bearings on the shaft
      ends. They
      > >use oilite bronze bushings which can't take the long run times
      needed for the
      > >MM.
      >
      > Actually, the old (1960's) Mopars and 80's Hondas already have
      > needle/roller/ball bearings on the rotor and gear reduction. At
      > least the gear reduction Hondas used needle bearings on the output
      > shaft, the old Mopars didn't. The Honda direct drive units use
      bushings.
      >
      > GM and Ford didn't use gear reduction, if memory serves me, and those
      > gear reduction units use straight cut gears and are noisy as all get
      out.
      >
      > David G. LeVine
      > Nashua, NH 03060
      >
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