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dfm/saftey/o70110/11:46

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  • DennisF MacIntyre
    dennis mac here Pat A bit off topic but safety s supreme in my book. I am currently visiting a country that in one of its cities is in the process of running
    Message 1 of 6 , Jan 9, 2007
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      dennis mac here Pat
               A bit off topic but safety's supreme in my book. I am currently visiting a country that in one of its cities is in the process of running what I am familiar with calling 'natural gas' lines to homes to replace oil fired heat. Now an admirable feature of heating these homes and businesses is that it is very comman to have these furnace boilers or heaters on the outside of the outside walls. My anxiety stems from the fact that these gas line threaded fittings (Black pipe tapered thread I am assuming) are using what appears to me to be awfully similar looking to three M's Teflon type tape. I have always been under the impression that the threads on black iron gas pipe had to be put together with pipe dope. These pipes also come indoors to feed the kitchen cooking unit. Why is it that some countries require the use of pipe dope when running gas? Is it for fire safety? I am only speculating.
        I know that one needs to be careful when tightening threaded fittings that have had Teflon tape or material applied so one does not over-tighten and stretch the fitting quite out of shape. These pipes seem to be using this thread on brass fittings as well which I find rather strange, but then, I am not a gas fitter even though I have worked with them. I am also a stranger in a very pleasant land. A land that we in the west could learn much from. For example - the designs on there highway overpass structures - very ornate and I believe act to deaden sound. This is very good and worthy of praise
        Is there a fire or other safety problem to using such tape on gas pipe threads.
      dennis mac

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    • Jim Dunmyer
      Dennis, I don t know about code, but Teflon tape is an excellent sealant for pipe threads. I ve even used extra layers when a fitting was damanged and been
      Message 2 of 6 , Jan 10, 2007
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        Dennis,
         I don't know about code, but Teflon tape is an excellent sealant for pipe threads. I've even used extra layers when a fitting was damanged and been able to seal it. Yes, you need to be careful about over-tightening, but the only other caveat is to not use it where there might be vibration or movement at the fitting. Regular pipe dope tends to "set up" to an extent and won't let the fittings move, where Teflon tape remains slippery. As long as the system is pressure-tested, I see no problem.
         
        The guys that installed my furnaces used Teflon pipe dope, and that's what I use these days. Much easier to work with than the tape.
         
                                                    <<Jim>>

        <<http://www.oldengine.org/members/jdunmyer>>
                    <<lower SE Michigan, USA>>
                     <<jdunmyer@...>>
                             
                 <<mailto:jdunmyer@...>>
        ----- Original Message -----
        Sent: Tuesday, January 09, 2007 10:27 PM
        Subject: [multimachine] dfm/saftey/o70110/11:46

        dennis mac here Pat
                 A bit off topic but safety's supreme in my book. I am currently visiting a country that in one of its cities is in the process of running what I am familiar with calling 'natural gas' lines to homes to replace oil fired heat. Now an admirable feature of heating these homes and businesses is that it is very comman to have these furnace boilers or heaters on the outside of the outside walls. My anxiety stems from the fact that these gas line threaded fittings (Black pipe tapered thread I am assuming) are using what appears to me to be awfully similar looking to three M's Teflon type tape. I have always been under the impression that the threads on black iron gas pipe had to be put together with pipe dope. These pipes also come indoors to feed the kitchen cooking unit. Why is it that some countries require the use of pipe dope when running gas? Is it for fire safety? I am only speculating.
          I know that one needs to be careful when tightening threaded fittings that have had Teflon tape or material applied so one does not over-tighten and stretch the fitting quite out of shape. These pipes seem to be using this thread on brass fittings as well which I find rather strange, but then, I am not a gas fitter even though I have worked with them. I am also a stranger in a very pleasant land. A land that we in the west could learn much from. For example - the designs on there highway overpass structures - very ornate and I believe act to deaden sound. This is very good and worthy of praise
          Is there a fire or other safety problem to using such tape on gas pipe threads.
        dennis mac
      • Chris Bryant
        ... Here in Florida standard Teflon tape is prohibited by code for gas fittings, but there is a full density version which is approved. It s yellow (for ID
        Message 3 of 6 , Jan 10, 2007
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          On 01/09/2007 10:27 pm, DennisF MacIntyre wrote:
          > My anxiety stems from the fact that these gas line threaded fittings (Black
          > pipe tapered thread I am assuming) are using what appears to me to be
          > awfully similar looking to three M's Teflon type tape. I have always been
          > under the impression that the threads on black iron gas pipe had to be put
          > together with pipe dope. These pipes also come indoors to feed the kitchen
          > cooking unit. Why is it that some countries require the use of pipe dope
          > when running gas?

          Here in Florida standard Teflon tape is prohibited by code for gas fittings,
          but there is a "full density" version which is approved. It's yellow (for ID
          purposes). The fear is that standard tef tape can shred easily and might gum
          up a valve.
          I always use Harvey's Rectorseal #5 for LP fittings- whether black iron or
          brass.

          --
          Chris Bryant
        • Jeff
          My general observations, if your under an inch almost anything will work. Over an inch you better have some pipe dope or be prepaired for leaks. I have used
          Message 4 of 6 , Jan 10, 2007
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            My general observations, if your under an inch almost anything will
            work. Over an inch you better have some pipe dope or be prepaired for
            leaks.
            I have used JB-Weld as pipe dope on severly worn large pipe threads
            with good success. It can save a lot of tear down time if you can
            afford the day to cure.
            I like Loctite 565 PST for most plumbing projects it provides the best
            odds for succss and it comes in a nice squeeze tube.
            Natural gas is lighter than air and therefore will not accumulate in
            pockets on the ground. If the lines never enter the residince they may
            not care about a few minor leaks.
            Jeff

            --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, Chris Bryant <list@...> wrote:
            >
            > On 01/09/2007 10:27 pm, DennisF MacIntyre wrote:
            > > My anxiety stems from the fact that these gas line threaded
            fittings (Black
            > > pipe tapered thread I am assuming) are using what appears to me to be
            > > awfully similar looking to three M's Teflon type tape. I have
            always been
            > > under the impression that the threads on black iron gas pipe had
            to be put
            > > together with pipe dope. These pipes also come indoors to feed the
            kitchen
            > > cooking unit. Why is it that some countries require the use of
            pipe dope
            > > when running gas?
            >
            > Here in Florida standard Teflon tape is prohibited by code for gas
            fittings,
            > but there is a "full density" version which is approved. It's yellow
            (for ID
            > purposes). The fear is that standard tef tape can shred easily and
            might gum
            > up a valve.
            > I always use Harvey's Rectorseal #5 for LP fittings- whether black
            iron or
            > brass.
            >
            > --
            > Chris Bryant
            >
          • spongkr
            When they ran natural gas lines to my house, they used yellow tape for sealing the joints in the black pipe. We had a house blow up in our neighborhood from
            Message 5 of 6 , Jan 10, 2007
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              When they ran natural gas lines to my house, they used yellow tape for
              sealing the joints in the black pipe. We had a house blow up in our
              neighborhood from an old leaky gas line. The gas apparently followed
              along the pipe and into their basement until a spark set it off.
              Natural gas is nothing to fool around with -- there wasn't much left
              of the house other than a lot of splinters and nearby houses were
              moved off their foundations from the explosion. It was a miracle that
              the family survived with only a few scratches. They were all in bed
              at the time and their mattresses protected them from the debris flying
              up from below, but it wasn't a good way to suddenly wake up out in
              their front lawn. Since then the gas company has made routine leak
              checks of gas lines in our neighborhood. The main lesson from this is
              to make sure natural gas lines meet the local codes and have been
              pressure tested. Putting a gas detector near the furnace and water
              heater isn't a bad idea either.

              Ken

              --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, Chris Bryant <list@...> wrote:
              >
              > On 01/09/2007 10:27 pm, DennisF MacIntyre wrote:
              > > My anxiety stems from the fact that these gas line threaded
              fittings (Black
              > > pipe tapered thread I am assuming) are using what appears to me to be
              > > awfully similar looking to three M's Teflon type tape. I have
              always been
              > > under the impression that the threads on black iron gas pipe had
              to be put
              > > together with pipe dope. These pipes also come indoors to feed the
              kitchen
              > > cooking unit. Why is it that some countries require the use of
              pipe dope
              > > when running gas?
              >
              > Here in Florida standard Teflon tape is prohibited by code for gas
              fittings,
              > but there is a "full density" version which is approved. It's yellow
              (for ID
              > purposes). The fear is that standard tef tape can shred easily and
              might gum
              > up a valve.
              > I always use Harvey's Rectorseal #5 for LP fittings- whether black
              iron or
              > brass.
              >
              > --
              > Chris Bryant
              >
            • Darwin Wandler
              Pipe dope or liquid Teflon on black iron is still required in Canada and I believe the US because it is the most effective method to guarantee a good seal. I
              Message 6 of 6 , Jan 10, 2007
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                Pipe dope or liquid Teflon  on black iron is still required in Canada and I believe
                the US because it is the most effective method to guarantee a good seal. I have
                seen Teflon tape used on propane fittings and brass fittings. I have to check if
                this meets code. The pipe dope shows a leak quite redily whereas tape does not.
                The  requirement to use dope is in the process of changing due to the new code
                requirement to ALWAYS pressure test lines prior to being put into service. It
                has not yet been laid to rest.
                Darwin

                DennisF MacIntyre wrote:
                dennis mac here Pat
                         A bit off topic but safety's supreme in my book. I am currently visiting a country that in one of its cities is in the process of running what I am familiar with calling 'natural gas' lines to homes to replace oil fired heat. Now an admirable feature of heating these homes and businesses is that it is very comman to have these furnace boilers or heaters on the outside of the outside walls. My anxiety stems from the fact that these gas line threaded fittings (Black pipe tapered thread I am assuming) are using what appears to me to be awfully similar looking to three M's Teflon type tape. I have always been under the impression that the threads on black iron gas pipe had to be put together with pipe dope. These pipes also come indoors to feed the kitchen cooking unit. Why is it that some countries require the use of pipe dope when running gas? Is it for fire safety? I am only speculating.
                  I know that one needs to be careful when tightening threaded fittings that have had Teflon tape or material applied so one does not over-tighten and stretch the fitting quite out of shape. These pipes seem to be using this thread on brass fittings as well which I find rather strange, but then, I am not a gas fitter even though I have worked with them. I am also a stranger in a very pleasant land. A land that we in the west could learn much from. For example - the designs on there highway overpass structures - very ornate and I believe act to deaden sound. This is very good and worthy of praise
                  Is there a fire or other safety problem to using such tape on gas pipe threads.
                dennis mac

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