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Re: Romig horizontal mill

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  • Pat Delany
    I don t know how to find all the Romig plans but I think a collection of all of them would be very important for a bunch of reasons. I like your idea of trying
    Message 1 of 7 , Sep 24, 2006
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      I don't know how to find all the Romig plans but I think a collection
      of all of them would be very important for a bunch of reasons.

      I like your idea of trying to include dovetails in a casting. I have
      been having similar thoughts about including steel bar reinforcements,
      threaded parts and pieces of pipe that would reinforce holes in cast
      mounting brackets. All things I know nothing about.

      Pat
      --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, "David G. LeVine" <dlevine@...>
      wrote:
      >
      > Does this technology for castings look interesting as a means to make
      > large objects, like a knee, with very basic tools?
      >
      > For example, if flat steel inserts were cast into a block, steel
      > dovetails could be formed without the need for large machine tools.
      >
      > Gotta try this soon...
      >
      > David G. LeVine
      > Nashua, NH 03060
      >
    • DennisF MacIntyre
      For the benefit of new readers would it be good to say to not use just ordinary concrete to cast machine parts, because of its unwanted ability to flex, but at
      Message 2 of 7 , Sep 25, 2006
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        For the benefit of new readers would it be good to say to not use just ordinary concrete to cast machine parts, because of its unwanted ability to flex, but at the very least a bag of cheap polymer concrete mix suitably reinforced? I am also wondering if it might be an idea to build into the design an adjust-ability between the parts. For example, say a cement head were to be cast for a lathe.  One might put four L shaped pieces of 1/2 inch threaded rod near the lower part of the head.  (L shape to let them be firm in place)  After the cement were dry and seasoned, four 1/2 nuts could be added and then the whole head could be placed on the steel plate of a lathe bed with the threaded rod going through four holes and four more nuts added. Though their may be some need to elongate (make the holes oval) the holes for adjustment, such adjustments to these eight nuts will afford proper aligning up of the cast in or eventually placed spindle shaft at the upper end of this cement casting.
          This ability to make adjustments as it seasons may ensure it won't be just an expensive boat anchor.
        dennis mac.

        Pat Delany <rigmatch@...> wrote:
        I don't know how to find all the Romig plans but I think a collection
        of all of them would be very important for a bunch of reasons.

        I like your idea of trying to include dovetails in a casting. I have
        been having similar thoughts about including steel bar reinforcements,
        threaded parts and pieces of pipe that would reinforce holes in cast
        mounting brackets. All things I know nothing about.

        Pat
        --- In multimachine@ yahoogroups. com, "David G. LeVine" <dlevine@... >
        wrote:
        >
        > Does this technology for castings look interesting as a means to make
        > large objects, like a knee, with very basic tools?
        >
        > For example, if flat steel inserts were cast into a block, steel
        > dovetails could be formed without the need for large machine tools.
        >
        > Gotta try this soon...
        >
        > David G. LeVine
        > Nashua, NH 03060
        >



        Be smarter than spam. See how smart SpamGuard is at giving junk email the boot with the All-new Yahoo! Mail

      • rick
        ... 4x4 steel tubing rather than wood filled with concrete like in the plans. But when i was pushing the cement down in the column i hit the overarm and i
        Message 3 of 7 , Sep 25, 2006
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          --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, "David G. LeVine" <dlevine@...>
          wrote:
          >I tried making one of the romig mills last winter i used a piece of
          4x4 steel tubing rather than wood filled with concrete like in the
          plans. But when i was pushing the cement down in the column i hit
          the overarm and i didn't check it for alignment until after the cement
          dried. It was way off





          > Does this technology for castings look interesting as a means to make
          > large objects, like a knee, with very basic tools?
          >
          > For example, if flat steel inserts were cast into a block, steel
          > dovetails could be formed without the need for large machine tools.
          >
          > Gotta try this soon...
          >
          > David G. LeVine
          > Nashua, NH 03060
          >
        • Pat Delany
          Rick The beauty of the MM is that the spindle is going to be aligned if the block is bored to fit the bearing od. Pat
          Message 4 of 7 , Sep 27, 2006
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            Rick
            The beauty of the MM is that the spindle is going to be aligned if the
            block is bored to fit the bearing od.

            Pat


            --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, "rick" <rgbai42@...> wrote:
            >
            > --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, "David G. LeVine" <dlevine@>
            > wrote:
            > >I tried making one of the romig mills last winter i used a piece of
            > 4x4 steel tubing rather than wood filled with concrete like in the
            > plans. But when i was pushing the cement down in the column i hit
            > the overarm and i didn't check it for alignment until after the cement
            > dried. It was way off
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > > Does this technology for castings look interesting as a means to make
            > > large objects, like a knee, with very basic tools?
            > >
            > > For example, if flat steel inserts were cast into a block, steel
            > > dovetails could be formed without the need for large machine tools.
            > >
            > > Gotta try this soon...
            > >
            > > David G. LeVine
            > > Nashua, NH 03060
            > >
            >
          • kwolson2002
            Dennis, et. al. - Commercially, there is stuff made by the company that makes moglice , which is designed to be used to pot together machine tools built out
            Message 5 of 7 , Sep 29, 2006
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              Dennis, et. al. -

              Commercially, there is stuff made by the company that
              makes "moglice", which is designed to be used to "pot" together
              machine tools built out of pieces. Some formulations are designed to
              be removable (stick to one piece, but not the other) while other
              formulations are permanent. Google "moglice" to find the US
              distributor, "DeWitt" something-or-other. They have a downloadable
              technical manual which describes how to use the standard "moglice", a
              molybdonum disulfide filled epoxy, and the other epoxy "potting"
              stuff, with lots of pictures and examples, too. It's possible that
              something like JB Weld or LabMetal or some homebrew metal-filled
              epoxy could be used for such purposes.

              Kevin

              --- In multimachine@yahoogroups.com, DennisF MacIntyre <a1g2r3i@...>
              wrote:
              >
              > For the benefit of new readers would it be good to say to not use
              just ordinary concrete to cast machine parts, because of its unwanted
              ability to flex, but at the very least a bag of cheap polymer
              concrete mix suitably reinforced? I am also wondering if it might be
              an idea to build into the design an adjust-ability between the parts.
              For example, say a cement head were to be cast for a lathe. One
              might put four L shaped pieces of 1/2 inch threaded rod near the
              lower part of the head. (L shape to let them be firm in place)
              After the cement were dry and seasoned, four 1/2 nuts could be added
              and then the whole head could be placed on the steel plate of a lathe
              bed with the threaded rod going through four holes and four more nuts
              added. Though their may be some need to elongate (make the holes
              oval) the holes for adjustment, such adjustments to these eight nuts
              will afford proper aligning up of the cast in or eventually placed
              spindle shaft at the upper end of this cement
              > casting.
              > This ability to make adjustments as it seasons may ensure it
              won't be just an expensive boat anchor.
              > dennis mac.
              >
            • DennisF MacIntyre
              Thank you Keven, you have whetted my appetite. dennis mac kwolson2002 wrote: Dennis, et. al. - Commercially, there is stuff made by
              Message 6 of 7 , Oct 2, 2006
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                Thank you Keven, you have whetted my appetite.
                dennis mac

                kwolson2002 <kwayneolson@...> wrote:
                Dennis, et. al. -

                Commercially, there is stuff made by the company that
                makes "moglice", which is designed to be used to "pot" together
                machine tools built out of pieces. Some formulations are designed to
                be removable (stick to one piece, but not the other) while other
                formulations are permanent. Google "moglice" to find the US
                distributor, "DeWitt" something-or- other. They have a downloadable
                technical manual which describes how to use the standard "moglice", a
                molybdonum disulfide filled epoxy, and the other epoxy "potting"
                stuff, with lots of pictures and examples, too. It's possible that
                something like JB Weld or LabMetal or some homebrew metal-filled
                epoxy could be used for such purposes.

                Kevin

                --- In multimachine@ yahoogroups. com, DennisF MacIntyre <a1g2r3i@... >
                wrote:
                >
                > For the benefit of new readers would it be good to say to not use
                just ordinary concrete to cast machine parts, because of its unwanted
                ability to flex, but at the very least a bag of cheap polymer
                concrete mix suitably reinforced? I am also wondering if it might be
                an idea to build into the design an adjust-ability between the parts.
                For example, say a cement head were to be cast for a lathe. One
                might put four L shaped pieces of 1/2 inch threaded rod near the
                lower part of the head. (L shape to let them be firm in place)
                After the cement were dry and seasoned, four 1/2 nuts could be added
                and then the whole head could be placed on the steel plate of a lathe
                bed with the threaded rod going through four holes and four more nuts
                added. Though their may be some need to elongate (make the holes
                oval) the holes for adjustment, such adjustments to these eight nuts
                will afford proper aligning up of the cast in or eventually placed
                spindle shaft at the upper end of this cement
                > casting.
                > This ability to make adjustments as it seasons may ensure it
                won't be just an expensive boat anchor.
                > dennis mac.
                >



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