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OT: cutting steel w/wire

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  • Chris Tofu
    Imagine having to cut off some pretty recessed steel tubing, maybe 3/4 thick. Wouldn t it be nice if you could wrap a piece of wire around it and work it
    Message 1 of 7 , Aug 24, 2014
      Imagine having to cut off some pretty recessed steel tubing, maybe 3/4" thick. Wouldn't it be nice if you could wrap a piece of wire around it and work it around, back and forth. Am I just dreaming, or could there just be a better way? Don't want to get chips in the tubing if at all possible.
    • chris green
      Operators of quarries where they cut large limestone blocks, granite, etc, do use diamond coated wires to cut those blocks, so it s not impossible to use a
      Message 2 of 7 , Aug 24, 2014
        Operators of quarries where they cut large limestone blocks, granite, etc, do use diamond coated wires to cut those blocks, so it's not impossible to use a wire saw. The question is where to obtain a small length of it... That search might take a while if you're interested and want to follow up on it.

        Alternately, how about an oscillating saw like the kind used to cut grout when repairing tiles? These are also used as sanders, and some brands are reasonably inexpensive these days.  Here's a PopMech review of some of them: The Fein model has been discontinued. (It was pretty expensive anyways....) A trip to HomeDespot will be in order. :-)

        http://www.popularmechanics.com/home/improvement/interior/the-best-oscillating-tools-we-put-9-to-the-test#slide-1

        Cheers,

        Chris Green.


        On Sunday, August 24, 2014 6:21:27 PM, "Chris Tofu rampaginggreenhulk@... [multimachine]" <multimachine@yahoogroups.com> wrote:


         

        Imagine having to cut off some pretty recessed steel tubing, maybe 3/4" thick. Wouldn't it be nice if you could wrap a piece of wire around it and work it around, back and forth. Am I just dreaming, or could there just be a better way? Don't want to get chips in the tubing if at all possible.


      • chris green
        Here s HomeDespot s page for the Ryobi oscillating head sander/ cutter. $59. http://www.homedepot.ca/product/corded-ryobi-multitool/958829  These have been
        Message 3 of 7 , Aug 24, 2014
          Here's HomeDespot's page for the Ryobi oscillating head sander/ cutter. $59.

          http://www.homedepot.ca/product/corded-ryobi-multitool/958829 

          These have been used since the early '60s to cut casts without harming the skin underneath. (I broke my arm in PhysEd in '66...) The blade vibrates 20-30,000 times a second, but the range of motion is quite small: it cuts hard stuff like metal, etc, but if it contacts something with some give (skin) the skin moves wit it enough that it isn't cut. :-)

          Cheers,

          Chris Green.




          On Sunday, August 24, 2014 8:47:27 PM, "chris green hraefn_2@... [multimachine]" <multimachine@yahoogroups.com> wrote:


           
          Operators of quarries where they cut large limestone blocks, granite, etc, do use diamond coated wires to cut those blocks, so it's not impossible to use a wire saw. The question is where to obtain a small length of it... That search might take a while if you're interested and want to follow up on it.

          Alternately, how about an oscillating saw like the kind used to cut grout when repairing tiles? These are also used as sanders, and some brands are reasonably inexpensive these days.  Here's a PopMech review of some of them: The Fein model has been discontinued. (It was pretty expensive anyways....) A trip to HomeDespot will be in order. :-)

          http://www.popularmechanics.com/home/improvement/interior/the-best-oscillating-tools-we-put-9-to-the-test#slide-1

          Cheers,

          Chris Green.


          On Sunday, August 24, 2014 6:21:27 PM, "Chris Tofu rampaginggreenhulk@... [multimachine]" <multimachine@yahoogroups.com> wrote:


           

          Imagine having to cut off some pretty recessed steel tubing, maybe 3/4" thick. Wouldn't it be nice if you could wrap a piece of wire around it and work it around, back and forth. Am I just dreaming, or could there just be a better way? Don't want to get chips in the tubing if at all possible.




        • louisrfnauto
          their are carbide coated hacksaw blades,tiny chunks of carbide exposied to steel blade, made by remington, most hardware stores in then USA carry them . 2
          Message 4 of 7 , Aug 24, 2014
            their are carbide coated hacksaw blades,tiny chunks of carbide exposied to steel blade, made by remington, most hardware stores in then USA carry them . 2 syles, a standard blade 5/8  tall regular thickness (.060?) ,and a wire coated style about .080-.100 thick. i have used these to cut hardened steel they do the job , but it does wear off some of the carbide.
          • chris green
            I have a miniature tube cutter for work in tight spaces like this, but you do need an inch or two of space behind the piping and enough room to rotate them,
            Message 5 of 7 , Aug 24, 2014
              I have a miniature tube cutter for work in tight spaces like this, but you do need an inch or two of space behind the piping and enough room to rotate them, etc. The kind of pipe cutters used on household plumbing made from copper. I don't know how well or even if they'd work on steel....

              Cheers,

              Chris Green.


              On Sunday, August 24, 2014 11:01:09 PM, "louisrfnauto@... [multimachine]" <multimachine@yahoogroups.com> wrote:


               
              their are carbide coated hacksaw blades,tiny chunks of carbide exposied to steel blade, made by remington, most hardware stores in then USA carry them . 2 syles, a standard blade 5/8  tall regular thickness (.060?) ,and a wire coated style about .080-.100 thick. i have used these to cut hardened steel they do the job , but it does wear off some of the carbide.


            • pokerbacken
              I know for a fact that one can embed abrasive powder into copper, aluminium, brass, lead, among other soft metals to make lapidary equipment (laps, wheels,
              Message 6 of 7 , Aug 29, 2014
                I know for a fact that one can embed abrasive powder into copper, aluminium, brass, lead, among other soft metals to make lapidary equipment (laps, wheels, files, saws...) , even a cotton (or any other material) string with wax/oil and abrasive powder would work, true, would also require ridiculously  high rate of replacement and have no dimensional stability to speak of but easy to get.
              • chris green
                Here s a possible solution: a carbide grit wire saw. Cheaper than borscht, too... The cBay URL is way too long, so here s the tinyURL link I made:
                Message 7 of 7 , Aug 29, 2014
                  Here's a possible solution: a carbide grit wire saw. Cheaper than borscht, too...


                  The cBay URL is way too long, so here's the tinyURL link I made:

                  http://tinyurl.com/lmycdqb

                  Again, either these or the diamond wire hand saw version could be available at your local Grainger's or a similar Industrial supplier, and maybe even Home Despot. I know I've seen them on my walkabouts over the years.... :-)

                  Cheers,

                  Chris Green.


                  On Friday, August 29, 2014 11:01:15 AM, pokerbacken <no_reply@yahoogroups.com> wrote:


                   
                  I know for a fact that one can embed abrasive powder into copper, aluminium, brass, lead, among other soft metals to make lapidary equipment (laps, wheels, files, saws...) , even a cotton (or any other material) string with wax/oil and abrasive powder would work, true, would also require ridiculously  high rate of replacement and have no dimensional stability to speak of but easy to get.


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