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Timing belt power transmission question

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  • rigmatch
    How much (power, watts, torque?) could be transmitted by a half inch wide timing belt and 1 inch pulley turning about 5 rpm. Are aluminum acme screws commonly
    Message 1 of 16 , Jan 25, 2014
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      How much (power, watts, torque?) could be transmitted by a half inch wide timing belt and 1 inch pulley turning about 5 rpm.

      Are aluminum acme screws commonly used anywhere?

      Help will be VERY appreciated!

      Pat
    • Ian Newman
      Hi Pat, How much (power, watts, torque?) could be transmitted by a half inch wide timing belt and 1 inch pulley turning about 5 rpm You have to
      Message 2 of 16 , Jan 25, 2014
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        Hi Pat,

        <SNIP>
        How much (power, watts, torque?) could be transmitted by a half inch wide timing belt and 1 inch pulley turning about 5 rpm
        </SNIP>

        You have to take a few more things in to consideration - try this document:

        http://www.mitcalc.com/en/ui/tbelt.pdf

        All the best,
        Ian



        From: "rigmatch@..." <rigmatch@...>
        To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Saturday, 25 January 2014, 19:18
        Subject: [multimachine] Timing belt power transmission question

         
        How much (power, watts, torque?) could be transmitted by a half inch wide timing belt and 1 inch pulley turning about 5 rpm.
        Are aluminum acme screws commonly used anywhere?

        Help will be VERY appreciated!

        Pat


      • Eggleston Lance
        Materials and Processes back to top All Acme lead screws, 1 3/4 inches in diameter and larger, are made of special quality medium carbon steel. Acme lead
        Message 3 of 16 , Jan 25, 2014
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          Materials and Processes back to top
          All Acme lead screws, 1 3/4 inches in diameter and larger, are made of special quality medium carbon steel. Acme lead screws smaller than 1 3/4 inches are made from special quality low carbon steel. Sizes with Material listed as "Stainless Steel" (on the Acme Screw Data and Part Numbers page) are made from 304 type stainless steel. Alternate acme lead screw materials are aluminum alloys, other stainless grades, and high machinability grades of carbon steel. (For more information on materials see Table 35)

          Acme lead screws are cold formed using a unique, highly accurate thread rolling process which guarantees a smooth, accurate, high quality thread. Our thread rolling process eliminates the interrupted grain flow of conventional cut threads, thereby increasing yield, ultimate, and fatigue strengths.


          lance
          ++++

          Are aluminum acme screws commonly used anywhere?

          Help will be VERY appreciated!

          Pat

        • louis richardson
          you can find steel ACME screws in office and buisness chairs, a bit short and not made for constant use, but easy to find,and dirt cheap to buy. From:
          Message 4 of 16 , Jan 25, 2014
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            you can find steel ACME screws in office and buisness chairs, a bit short and not made for constant use, but easy to find,and dirt cheap to buy.

            From: Eggleston Lance <wheezer606@...>
            To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Saturday, January 25, 2014 2:54 PM
            Subject: Re: [multimachine] Timing belt power transmission question
             
            Materials and Processes back to top
            All Acme lead screws, 1 3/4 inches in diameter and larger, are made of special quality medium carbon steel. Acme lead screws smaller than 1 3/4 inches are made from special quality low carbon steel. Sizes with Material listed as "Stainless Steel" (on the Acme Screw Data and Part Numbers page) are made from 304 type stainless steel. Alternate acme lead screw materials are aluminum alloys, other stainless grades, and high machinability grades of carbon steel. (For more information on materials see Table 35)
            Acme lead screws are cold formed using a unique, highly accurate thread rolling process which guarantees a smooth, accurate, high quality thread. Our thread rolling process eliminates the interrupted grain flow of conventional cut threads, thereby increasing yield, ultimate, and fatigue strengths.

            lance
            ++++
            Are aluminum acme screws commonly used anywhere?

            Help will be VERY appreciated!

            Pat
          • Pat Delany
            Thanks Guys!! Just what I needed to find out. Pat On Saturday, January 25, 2014 6:06 PM, louis richardson wrote:   you can find steel
            Message 5 of 16 , Jan 25, 2014
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              Thanks Guys!!
              Just what I needed to find out.

              Pat


              On Saturday, January 25, 2014 6:06 PM, louis richardson <louisrfnauto@...> wrote:
               
              you can find steel ACME screws in office and buisness chairs, a bit short and not made for constant use, but easy to find,and dirt cheap to buy.

              From: Eggleston Lance <wheezer606@...>
              To: multimachine@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Saturday, January 25, 2014 2:54 PM
              Subject: Re: [multimachine] Timing belt power transmission question
               
              Materials and Processes back to top
              All Acme lead screws, 1 3/4 inches in diameter and larger, are made of special quality medium carbon steel. Acme lead screws smaller than 1 3/4 inches are made from special quality low carbon steel. Sizes with Material listed as "Stainless Steel" (on the Acme Screw Data and Part Numbers page) are made from 304 type stainless steel. Alternate acme lead screw materials are aluminum alloys, other stainless grades, and high machinability grades of carbon steel. (For more information on materials see Table 35)
              Acme lead screws are cold formed using a unique, highly accurate thread rolling process which guarantees a smooth, accurate, high quality thread. Our thread rolling process eliminates the interrupted grain flow of conventional cut threads, thereby increasing yield, ultimate, and fatigue strengths.

              lance
              ++++
              Are aluminum acme screws commonly used anywhere?

              Help will be VERY appreciated!

              Pat


            • David G. LeVine
              ... Not to my knowledge, the wear is too fast unless hardcoated. Dave 8{) -- A word to the wise ain t necessary - it s the stupid ones that need the advice.
              Message 6 of 16 , Jan 27, 2014
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                On 01/25/2014 02:18 PM, rigmatch@... wrote:
                Are aluminum acme screws commonly used anywhere?

                Help will be VERY appreciated!

                Pat

                Not to my knowledge, the wear is too fast unless hardcoated.

                Dave  8{)

                --

                "A word to the wise ain't necessary - it's the stupid ones that need the advice."

                Bill Cosby
              • Eggleston Lance
                I would think that 6000-7000 series tempered would be hard enough for a lead screw. lance ++++
                Message 7 of 16 , Jan 27, 2014
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                  I would think that 6000-7000  series tempered
                  would be hard enough for a lead screw.

                  lance
                  ++++
                  On Jan 27, 2014, at 7:56 PM, David G. LeVine wrote:

                  Are aluminum acme screws commonly used anywhere?

                  Help will be VERY appreciated!

                  Pat

                • Pat Delany
                  The reason I asked is that that is for a mobility device for handicapped people and minimum weight is all important. Pat  On Monday, January 27, 2014 8:51 PM,
                  Message 8 of 16 , Jan 27, 2014
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                    The reason I asked is that that is for a mobility device for handicapped people and minimum weight is all important.



                    Pat 


                    On Monday, January 27, 2014 8:51 PM, Eggleston Lance <wheezer606@...> wrote:
                     
                    I would think that 6000-7000  series tempered
                    would be hard enough for a lead screw.

                    lance
                    ++++
                    On Jan 27, 2014, at 7:56 PM, David G. LeVine wrote:

                    Are aluminum acme screws commonly used anywhere?

                    Help will be VERY appreciated!

                    Pat



                  • louis richardson
                    well gun drill acme shaft throught the center all the way through to lighten it up. drill from both sides if you have to. From: Pat Delany
                    Message 9 of 16 , Jan 27, 2014
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                      well gun drill acme shaft throught the center all the way through to lighten it up. drill from both sides if you have to.

                      From: Pat Delany <rigmatch@...>
                      To: "multimachine@yahoogroups.com" <multimachine@yahoogroups.com>
                      Sent: Monday, January 27, 2014 8:59 PM
                      Subject: Re: [multimachine] Timing belt power transmission question
                       
                      The reason I asked is that that is for a mobility device for handicapped people and minimum weight is all important.



                      Pat 
                      On Monday, January 27, 2014 8:51 PM, Eggleston Lance <wheezer606@...> wrote:
                       
                      I would think that 6000-7000  series tempered
                      would be hard enough for a lead screw.

                      lance
                      ++++
                      On Jan 27, 2014, at 7:56 PM, David G. LeVine wrote:
                      Are aluminum acme screws commonly used anywhere?

                      Help will be VERY appreciated!

                      Pat

                    • Shannon DeWolfe
                      ... Pat, This company makes lead screws in aluminum and even titanium, if you can afford it. :-) http://www.helixlinear.com Be sure to download the catalog. A
                      Message 10 of 16 , Jan 28, 2014
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                        On 1/27/2014 8:59 PM, Pat Delany wrote:
                        > The reason I asked is that that is for a mobility device for
                        > handicapped people and minimum weight is all important.
                        Pat,

                        This company makes lead screws in aluminum and even titanium, if you can
                        afford it. :-)

                        http://www.helixlinear.com

                        Be sure to download the catalog. A lot of information there, including
                        anti-lash nuts.

                        http://www.helixlinear.com/Content/media/HELIX-Precision-Miniature-Lead-Screw-Assemblies-Catalog.pdf

                        Regards,

                        --
                        Mr. Shannon DeWolfe
                        -- I've taken to using mister because my name misleads folks on the WWW. I am a 58 year old fat man. ;-)
                      • David G. LeVine
                        ... Pat, Actually it isn t. If it were, all gearsets would be planetary and titanium with no lubrication. Clearly not the best choice. Longevity, reliability
                        Message 11 of 16 , Jan 28, 2014
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                          On 01/27/2014 09:59 PM, Pat Delany wrote:
                          > The reason I asked is that that is for a mobility device for
                          > handicapped people and minimum weight is all important.

                          Pat,

                          Actually it isn't. If it were, all gearsets would be planetary and
                          titanium with no lubrication. Clearly not the best choice.

                          Longevity, reliability and cost all matter. Weight is important, but
                          the batteries are lead-acid (at over $200/chair to normal people),
                          rather than Lithium Ion (which are lighter and hold much more energy per
                          pound.) The motors are often DC traction motors rather than BLDC type
                          (much more complex and expensive.)

                          A 18650 (3.7 V 3800 mAh cell) costs about $2.00, a wheelchair battery
                          (like a UB12350, 12 V 35 AH) costs about $61, a chair uses two of them,
                          so $122 (wholesale!) The 18650s need 40 cells to match just one or $80,
                          so the same pack for a chair would be $160.00, BUT the chargers and
                          protectors will add a bunch (each cell needs a charge controller to
                          prevent explosions), they can add more than the cells cost.

                          Now, with power wheel chairs costing $8K plus, adding a few thousand
                          dollars to the list price is not cheap when the users are on limited
                          incomes.

                          And that is only one item in the parts list.

                          Dave 8{)
                          --

                          "A word to the wise ain't necessary - it's the stupid ones that need the
                          advice."

                          Bill Cosby
                        • la_strega_nera_veloce
                          I had a aluminiuim acme thread lead screw sitting in a cupboard a couple of years ago - they re used in Circle track racing cars in the USA for adjusting
                          Message 12 of 16 , Jan 28, 2014
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                            I had a aluminiuim acme thread lead screw sitting in a cupboard a couple of years ago -  they're used in Circle track racing cars in the USA for adjusting weight jacking and sometimes the height of pivot blocks - I've been trying to find one by searching, but not having any luck. From memory it was 3/4" diameter and 12" long.

                             

                            Ben

                          • Pat Delany
                            You would think that some CNC shop could crank these out. Maybe someone is missing a good market. Pat On Tuesday, January 28, 2014 6:21 PM,
                            Message 13 of 16 , Jan 28, 2014
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                              You would think that some CNC shop could crank these out. Maybe someone is missing a good market.

                              Pat


                              On Tuesday, January 28, 2014 6:21 PM, "la_strega_nera@..." <la_strega_nera@...> wrote:
                               
                              I had a aluminiuim acme thread lead screw sitting in a cupboard a couple of years ago -  they're used in Circle track racing cars in the USA for adjusting weight jacking and sometimes the height of pivot blocks - I've been trying to find one by searching, but not having any luck. From memory it was 3/4" diameter and 12" long.
                               
                              Ben


                            • Dennis Shelgren
                              I ve seen them in automotive power seats with teflon nuts, but they are fairly short and rare. My cnc lathe will be done soon, could probably make a handfull
                              Message 14 of 16 , Jan 29, 2014
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                                I've seen them in automotive power seats with teflon nuts, but they are fairly short and rare. My cnc lathe will be done soon, could probably make a handfull while not doing pistons.

                              • HB
                                You would think that some CNC shop could crank these out. Maybe someone is missing a good market.  Pat Or, someone with a reasonably powerful screw-cutting
                                Message 15 of 16 , Jan 29, 2014
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                                  " You would think that some CNC shop could crank these out. Maybe someone is missing a good market. 
                                  Pat "


                                  Or, someone with a reasonably powerful screw-cutting lathe should be able to cut his own acme threaded rod in aluminum.
                                  It does not have to be done in a CNC machine.

                                  Pat, I don't really think there's a good profitable market for it since acme threaded aluminum rods are generally intended for special applications, not for common everyday-use equipment marketed for a wider base of consumers.


                                  From: Pat Delany <rigmatch@...>
                                  To: "multimachine@yahoogroups.com" <multimachine@yahoogroups.com>
                                  Sent: Tuesday, January 28, 2014 7:58 PM
                                  Subject: Re: [multimachine] Timing belt power transmission question

                                   
                                  You would think that some CNC shop could crank these out. Maybe someone is missing a good market.

                                  Pat


                                  On Tuesday, January 28, 2014 6:21 PM, "la_strega_nera@..." <la_strega_nera@...> wrote:
                                   
                                  I had a aluminiuim acme thread lead screw sitting in a cupboard a couple of years ago -  they're used in Circle track racing cars in the USA for adjusting weight jacking and sometimes the height of pivot blocks - I've been trying to find one by searching, but not having any luck. From memory it was 3/4" diameter and 12" long.
                                   
                                  Ben




                                • la_strega_nera_veloce
                                  Ahah - you just reminded me where I got it from - there is a CNC shop knocking them out (can t remember the name though - have a catalog somewhere in a
                                  Message 16 of 16 , Jan 29, 2014
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                                    Ahah - you just reminded me where I got it from - there is a CNC shop knocking them out (can't remember the name though - have a catalog somewhere in a cupboard though) - the circle track guys aren't really a big market and they're pretty well supplied. 

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