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off-topic -- ladders

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  • rscrane
    [I apologize in advance for this, but wasn t able to find any pertinent info elsewhere] I have a homeowner grade aluminum extension ladder that is nearly
    Message 1 of 4 , Oct 22, 2013
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      [I apologize in advance for this, but wasn't able to find any pertinent info elsewhere] 
      I  have a  homeowner grade  aluminum extension ladder that is nearly 30 years old. The pulley finally wore out, an easy replacement, but it got me to wondering about its useful life -- it's been stored indoors for about half the time. The plastic end caps are cracking, and the locks have rusted some, but the rest looks okay. Should I think about replacing it, which I'd rather not unless necessary?

      thanks in advance --


    • Eggleston Lance
      Place the ladder flat on the ground. Walk on the rungs with a bouncy step. If they hold your weight, carry a bucket with a load of water. If it holds the
      Message 2 of 4 , Oct 22, 2013
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        Place the ladder flat on the ground.
        Walk on the rungs with a bouncy step.
        If they hold your weight, carry a bucket with
        a load of water.
        If it holds the weight, use it.
        Replace the worn out bits.
        Older plastic is affected by UV, steel rusts.

        lance
        ++++

        On Oct 22, 2013, at 2:49 PM, <craner@...> <craner@...> wrote:

         Should I think about replacing it, which I'd rather not unless necessary?

      • Adam Simmons
        OSHA requires that the feet be in good shape, with no bent or dented rungs, and no bent or dented rails. They also require that the stickers be legible, which
        Message 3 of 4 , Oct 22, 2013
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          OSHA requires that the feet be in good shape, with no bent or dented rungs, and no bent or dented rails.  

          They also require that the stickers be legible, which is more for them than the person on the ladder.  If it visually checks out, I'd use it. 

           - Adam


          On Tue, Oct 22, 2013 at 2:59 PM, Eggleston Lance <wheezer606@...> wrote:
           

          Place the ladder flat on the ground.

          Walk on the rungs with a bouncy step.
          If they hold your weight, carry a bucket with
          a load of water.
          If it holds the weight, use it.
          Replace the worn out bits.
          Older plastic is affected by UV, steel rusts.

          lance
          ++++

          On Oct 22, 2013, at 2:49 PM, <craner@...> <craner@...> wrote:

           Should I think about replacing it, which I'd rather not unless necessary?


        • chris green
          I d think about replacing the end caps with some wooden ones, glued with epoxy. If possible, use some slow-to-decay hardwood like white oak, and give it a
          Message 4 of 4 , Oct 22, 2013
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            I'd think about replacing the end caps with some wooden ones, glued with epoxy. If possible, use some slow-to-decay hardwood like white oak, and give it a coating of epoxy then a coat or two of marine varnish to block the UV light that degrades epoxy.

            An occasional treatment of the rusty parts with some silicon penetrating oil (WD40, naturally) would tune things up.

            Chris Green.


            On Tuesday, October 22, 2013 3:48:30 PM, Adam Simmons <xyrthx@...> wrote:
             
            OSHA requires that the feet be in good shape, with no bent or dented rungs, and no bent or dented rails.  

            They also require that the stickers be legible, which is more for them than the person on the ladder.  If it visually checks out, I'd use it. 

             - Adam


            On Tue, Oct 22, 2013 at 2:59 PM, Eggleston Lance <wheezer606@...> wrote:
             
            Place the ladder flat on the ground.
            Walk on the rungs with a bouncy step.
            If they hold your weight, carry a bucket with
            a load of water.
            If it holds the weight, use it.
            Replace the worn out bits.
            Older plastic is affected by UV, steel rusts.

            lance
            ++++

            On Oct 22, 2013, at 2:49 PM, <craner@...> <craner@...> wrote:

             Should I think about replacing it, which I'd rather not unless necessary?




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